Subversion Repositories Scribus

Compare Revisions

Ignore whitespace Rev 18500 → Rev 18501

/trunk/Scribus/doc/en/print1.html
3,6 → 3,9
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8"/>
<title>Printing with Scribus</title>
</head>
<style>
@import "manual.css";
</style>
<body>
<h2>Printing with Scribus</h2>
<p>One of the issues in connection with an advanced DTP application like Scribus, is one of semantics, as &ldquo;printing&rdquo; or &ldquo;printer&rdquo; can mean different things. A &ldquo;printer&rdquo; can be either a device or a printing company, which will, of course, also use devices, but these are quite different from the one on your desktop. Moreover, a &ldquo;printer&rdquo; can also be a human being, i.e., someone whose profession is printing. Unfortunately, things are even more complicated, since not all printing devices are equal, and neither are professional printing companies. Nevertheless, to make things at least a bit clearer we will from now on refer to printing via your desktop device as &ldquo;local printing&rdquo;, whereas for print jobs at a printing company or a high-end printing machine the term &ldquo;commercial printing&rdquo; will be applied.</p>
/trunk/Scribus/doc/en/irc.html
3,17 → 3,18
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8"/>
<title>Scribus IRC</title>
</head>
<style>
@import "manual.css";
</style>
<body>
<h2>Scribus IRC</h2>
<p>Joining (clickable link): <a href="irc://irc.freenode.net/#scribus">irc://irc.freenode.net/#scribus</a></p>
 
Joining (clickable link): <a href="irc://irc.freenode.net/#scribus">irc://irc.freenode.net/#scribus</a>
 
<h4>Some Hints:</h4>
<p>One part of the Scribus community is the online one: IRC or Internet Relay Chat. For some, this might be quite unfamiliar as a support channel. However, it works really well we think. Usually, at least one Scribus Team member or knowledgeable user is around. Keep in mind the best time is Central European Time, especially evenings, when it tends to be liveliest. For some, IRC has connotations of flame wars and lots of arguing, but #scribus <strong>is</strong> a friendly congenial place. Flame fests and trolling are just not tolerated in #scribus. A good primer: <a href="http://blog.fnmueller.de/2008/02/23/rules-of-engagement-the-ten-commandments-of-irc">Rules of Engagement - The ten commandments of IRC</a>, also <a href="http://de.opensuse.org/IRC-Einführung">in German.</a></p>
 
<h4>Don't be shy, just ask.</h4>
<p></p>
When joining for the first time, say 'hi' and ask. #scribus (the '#' indicates a channel) is a friendly place. A short introduction is fine. For those who do not speak English, have no fear. First try in English, but there are a number of folks in #scribus who can speak a wide variety of languages. Among the Team Members, we can count at least seven languages spoken well enough to converse in IRC. Other regulars cover probably another half dozen.
<p>When joining for the first time, say 'hi' and ask. #scribus (the '#' indicates a channel) is a friendly place. A short introduction is fine. For those who do not speak English, have no fear. First try in English, but there are a number of folks in #scribus who can speak a wide variety of languages. Among the Team Members, we can count at least seven languages spoken well enough to converse in IRC. Other regulars cover probably another half dozen.</p>
 
<h4>Give Details</h4>
<p>It helps to know more than, "Something broke and now blah does not work." </p>
/trunk/Scribus/doc/en/workspace1.html
3,6 → 3,9
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8"/>
<title>Scribus' Workspace</title>
</head>
<style>
@import "manual.css";
</style>
<body>
<h2>Scribus' Workspace</h2>
 
68,4 → 71,4
 
<p>In the palette above, note the Styles drop down button. Using Styles is strongly recommended for efficient text layout and styling. With properly used styles, you can change the entire look of a document with a few clicks. </p>
</body>
</html>
</html>
/trunk/Scribus/doc/en/cms.html
3,6 → 3,9
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8"/>
<title>Color Management with Scribus</title>
</head>
<style>
@import "manual.css";
</style>
<body>
<h2>Color Management with Scribus</h2>
<h3>Overview</h3>
52,4 → 55,4
 
<br />
</body>
</html>
</html>
/trunk/Scribus/doc/en/readme-macosx.html
2,7 → 2,11
 
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8">
<title>Scribus on Mac OS X</title>
</head><body>
</head>
<style>
@import "manual.css";
</style>
<body>
<h2>Scribus on Mac OS X</h2>
<h3>Hardware</h3>
<ul>
/trunk/Scribus/doc/en/mouse.html
3,6 → 3,9
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8"/>
<title>Mouse Usage Hints </title>
</head>
<style>
@import "manual.css";
</style>
<body>
<h2>Mouse Usage Hints</h2>
 
/trunk/Scribus/doc/en/WwLines.html
3,12 → 3,15
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8"/>
<title>Working with Lines & Line Styles</title>
</head>
<style>
@import "manual.css";
</style>
<body>
<h2>Working with Lines & Line Styles</h2>
<h3>Properties: Lines</h3>
<table width="75%" cellpadding="5">
<tr><td><img src="images/line_tab7.png"></td>
<td valign="top">Here in the Line tab of the Properties palette is where we set the line attributes of the various kinds of lines used in Scribus, which includes:
<td valign="top"><p>Here in the Line tab of the Properties palette is where we set the line attributes of the various kinds of lines used in Scribus, which includes:</p>
<ul>
<li>Straight lines (single line segments)</li>
<li>Bezier curves</li>
16,8 → 19,8
<li>Borders of Shapes and Polygons</li>
<li>Borders of frames of all kinds &ndash; <i>these must have a color assigned for these settings to show.</i></li>
</ul>
We are going to describe these Line tab items a bit out of order, since it seems to make more sense this way for demonstration purposes.
<p>The bottom of our graphic here looks different from the default appearance, since in addition to the default <b>No Style</b>, we have created some <b>Line Styles</b> that we can use repeatedly in our document. This will be covered at the end of this section.
<p>We are going to describe these Line tab items a bit out of order, since it seems to make more sense this way for demonstration purposes.</p>
<p>The bottom of our graphic here looks different from the default appearance, since in addition to the default <b>No Style</b>, we have created some <b>Line Styles</b> that we can use repeatedly in our document. This will be covered at the end of this section.</p>
</td>
</tr>
</table>
24,28 → 27,28
<h3>Edges and Endings</h3>
<table>
<tr><td><img src="images/line_tab.png"></td>
<td>This screenshot shows the choices for corners (<b>Edges</b>) and <b>Endings</b> of lines.
<p>From left to right:
<td><p>This screenshot shows the choices for corners (<b>Edges</b>) and <b>Endings</b> of lines.</p>
<p>From left to right:</p>
<ul>
<li><b>Miter Join</b> and <b>Flat Cap</b></li>
<li><b>Bevel Join</b> and <b>Square Cap</b></li>
<li><b>Round Join</b> and <b>Round Cap</b></li>
</ul>
<p>Since each of these is an independent choice, you will have 9 possible combinations.</td>
<p>Since each of these is an independent choice, you will have 9 possible combinations.</p></td>
</tr></table>
<h3>Type of Line and Line Width</h3>
<table width="75%">
<tr>
<td valign="top">Here we see only a part of the extensive drop-down list for <b>Type of Line</b> choices.
<p>In addition to a wide array of predetermined choices, at the bottom of the list is a choice, <b>Custom</b>, which brings up the dialog you see below.</td>
<td valign="top"><p>Here we see only a part of the extensive drop-down list for <b>Type of Line</b> choices.</p>
<p>In addition to a wide array of predetermined choices, at the bottom of the list is a choice, <b>Custom</b>, which brings up the dialog you see below.</p></td>
<td><img src="images/line_tab2.png"></td></tr>
<tr><td>You can either manually move the sliders or use the spinboxes to make adjustments. If you have used <i>Gradients</i> in the Color tab, this slider should be familiar. Like gradients, not only can you adjust the transition points use see here, you can also add more by clicking the space underneath the slider &ndash; you will see a <b>+</b> appear next to the mouse cursor. The red triangle indicates the point for which the spinboxes apply. Remove points by click-dragging them off the slider (but you cannot have less than two).
<p>As you can see, these spinboxes have no units, since they are relative to the width of the line. The <b>Offset</b> shifts your pattern along the line and thus helps to prevent a space from occurring at the beginning or at some transition point such as a corner.
<tr><td><p>You can either manually move the sliders or use the spinboxes to make adjustments. If you have used <i>Gradients</i> in the Color tab, this slider should be familiar. Like gradients, not only can you adjust the transition points use see here, you can also add more by clicking the space underneath the slider &ndash; you will see a <b>+</b> appear next to the mouse cursor. The red triangle indicates the point for which the spinboxes apply. Remove points by click-dragging them off the slider (but you cannot have less than two).</p>
<p>As you can see, these spinboxes have no units, since they are relative to the width of the line. The <b>Offset</b> shifts your pattern along the line and thus helps to prevent a space from occurring at the beginning or at some transition point such as a corner.</p>
</td>
<td><img src="images/line_tab3.png"></td></tr>
<tr><td><img src="images/line_tab1.png"></td>
<td>The <b>Line Width</b> setting should need no explanation, but here to the left we see the effects of changing linewidth on the length and spacing of the same dash pattern, using linewidth settings of Hairline, 1.0 pts, and 2.0 pts respectively.
<p>The Edge and Endings settings here are the same for each line as was used above, so as you can see especially with round joins and caps, these also apply to our dashes.
<td><p>The <b>Line Width</b> setting should need no explanation, but here to the left we see the effects of changing linewidth on the length and spacing of the same dash pattern, using linewidth settings of Hairline, 1.0 pts, and 2.0 pts respectively.</p>
<p>The Edge and Endings settings here are the same for each line as was used above, so as you can see especially with round joins and caps, these also apply to our dashes.</p>
</td>
</tr>
</table>
53,18 → 56,18
<table width="65%" cellpadding="5">
<tr>
<td><img src="images/line_tab5.png"></td>
<td valign="bottom">Just as with <i>Type of Line</i>, we see in <b>Start Arrow</b> and <b>End Arrow</b> a quite extensive list of choices which you can discover on your own. Since these terms apply to opposite ends of a line, they can only be used with a line or an open figure, and therefore these buttons will be inactive with shapes, polygons, and frame borders.
<p>Below we see what began as a shape but then was edited to break up the triangle, so that the arrows could be applied &ndash; obviously, some &ldquo;arrows&rdquo; aren&rsquo;t arrows at all.</td>
<td valign="bottom"><p>Just as with <i>Type of Line</i>, we see in <b>Start Arrow</b> and <b>End Arrow</b> a quite extensive list of choices which you can discover on your own. Since these terms apply to opposite ends of a line, they can only be used with a line or an open figure, and therefore these buttons will be inactive with shapes, polygons, and frame borders.</p>
<p>Below we see what began as a shape but then was edited to break up the triangle, so that the arrows could be applied &ndash; obviously, some &ldquo;arrows&rdquo; aren&rsquo;t arrows at all.</p></td>
</tr>
<tr><td></td><td><img src="images/line_tab4.png"></td>
</tr>
</table>
<h3>Basepoint</h3>
We&rsquo;ve left this setting for last since it&rsquo;s a bit tricky. For any sort of line or figure, the initial settings in the X,Y,Z tab of Properties show the <b>X-Pos</b> and <b>Y-Pos</b> of the basepoint, which at first is the upper left corner of the frame or bounding box. In the case of a straight line, <b>X-Pos</b> and <b>Y-Pos</b> refer to the initial point from which the line was drawn. The other spinboxes in X,Y,Z show <b>Width</b> and <b>Height</b> of the bounding box &ndash; except for a straight line, which is defined by <b>Width</b> (i.e., length) only, plus the direction (<b>Rotation</b>) of the line, and its thickness.
<p>This condition is true for the Line tab <b>Basepoint</b> setting of <b>Left Point</b>. If you change the Basepoint to <b>End Points</b>, the X,Y,Z tab now shows spinboxes for <b>X1</b>, <b>Y1</b>, and <b>X2</b>, <b>Y2</b>.
<p>For a straight line, this means that <b>X1</b> and <b>Y1</b> refer to the <i>starting point of the line</i>, i.e., where the beginning of the line was when it was drawn. <b>X2</b> and <b>Y2</b> refer to the coordinates of the other end of the line.
<p>The example below is for a straight line &ndash; where you can see that <b>X-Pos</b> = <b>X1</b>, and <b>Y-Pos</b> = <b>Y1</b>.
<p>For anything more complex than a straight line, the values refer to the bounding box, in which case <b>X1</b> and <b>Y1</b> refer to the basepoint as set in the X,Y,Z tab, and the <b>X2</b> and <b>Y2</b> values refer to the width and height of the bounding box, and therefore will always be positive numbers.
<p>We&rsquo;ve left this setting for last since it&rsquo;s a bit tricky. For any sort of line or figure, the initial settings in the X,Y,Z tab of Properties show the <b>X-Pos</b> and <b>Y-Pos</b> of the basepoint, which at first is the upper left corner of the frame or bounding box. In the case of a straight line, <b>X-Pos</b> and <b>Y-Pos</b> refer to the initial point from which the line was drawn. The other spinboxes in X,Y,Z show <b>Width</b> and <b>Height</b> of the bounding box &ndash; except for a straight line, which is defined by <b>Width</b> (i.e., length) only, plus the direction (<b>Rotation</b>) of the line, and its thickness.</p>
<p>This condition is true for the Line tab <b>Basepoint</b> setting of <b>Left Point</b>. If you change the Basepoint to <b>End Points</b>, the X,Y,Z tab now shows spinboxes for <b>X1</b>, <b>Y1</b>, and <b>X2</b>, <b>Y2</b>.</p>
<p>For a straight line, this means that <b>X1</b> and <b>Y1</b> refer to the <i>starting point of the line</i>, i.e., where the beginning of the line was when it was drawn. <b>X2</b> and <b>Y2</b> refer to the coordinates of the other end of the line.</p>
<p>The example below is for a straight line &ndash; where you can see that <b>X-Pos</b> = <b>X1</b>, and <b>Y-Pos</b> = <b>Y1</b>.</p>
<p>For anything more complex than a straight line, the values refer to the bounding box, in which case <b>X1</b> and <b>Y1</b> refer to the basepoint as set in the X,Y,Z tab, and the <b>X2</b> and <b>Y2</b> values refer to the width and height of the bounding box, and therefore will always be positive numbers.</p>
<table cellpadding="15">
<tr><td>Basepoint: <b>Left Point</b>
<p><img src="images/geometry.png"></td>
75,12 → 78,12
<h3>Line Styles</h3>
<table width="75%" cellpadding="5">
<tr><td align="right"><img src="images/style_manager1.png"></td>
<td valign="top">Now that we&rsquo;ve explained various line attributes, it makes sense to talk about line styles.
<p>In <a href="WwStyles.html">Working with Styles</a> we discuss how to make text layout styles in Scribus. Here is our <b>Style Manager</b> dialog we saw there. If we click <b>New</b>, then choose <b>Line Style</b> from the drop-down list, we then expand the dialog to show the section for creating/editing line styles.</td></tr>
<td valign="top"><p>Now that we&rsquo;ve explained various line attributes, it makes sense to talk about line styles.</p>
<p>In <a href="WwStyles.html">Working with Styles</a> we discuss how to make text layout styles in Scribus. Here is our <b>Style Manager</b> dialog we saw there. If we click <b>New</b>, then choose <b>Line Style</b> from the drop-down list, we then expand the dialog to show the section for creating/editing line styles.</p></td></tr>
<tr><td><img src="images/line_tab6.png"></td>
<td>Just underneath the <i>Properties</i> label, there are two buttons, one for adding a style (so you don&rsquo;t have to keep going back to push the <b>New</b> button again), and the other to delete the highlighted style.
<p>If you compare your choices here with those in the Line tab of the Properties palette, you see a more limited selection. In Line Type, there is no Custom setting. There are no arrow settings, so these will be applied later if desired.
<p>What you do have here in addition are the choices for line color and line shading (saturation) that you would have had to make in the Color tab of the Properties palette.
<td><p>Just underneath the <i>Properties</i> label, there are two buttons, one for adding a style (so you don&rsquo;t have to keep going back to push the <b>New</b> button again), and the other to delete the highlighted style.</p>
<p>If you compare your choices here with those in the Line tab of the Properties palette, you see a more limited selection. In Line Type, there is no Custom setting. There are no arrow settings, so these will be applied later if desired.</p>
<p>What you do have here in addition are the choices for line color and line shading (saturation) that you would have had to make in the Color tab of the Properties palette.</p>
</td>
</tr>
</table>
/trunk/Scribus/doc/en/toolbox14.html
3,6 → 3,9
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8"/>
<title>LProf</title>
</head>
<style>
@import "manual.css";
</style>
<body>
<h2>LProf</h2>
<p><a href="http://lprof.sourceforge.net/">LProf</a> is an extremely useful tool to make color management work reliably in Scribus, especially for those running Linux or UNIX (but it&rsquo;s also avaliable for Windows and Mac&nbsp;OS&nbsp;X).</p>
10,4 → 13,4
<p>LProf supports many, but not all calibration devices. Please check LProf&rsquo;s <a href="http://lprof.sourceforge.net/">homepage</a> for a list of supported devices, as well as more detailed documentation.</p>
<table width="100%"><tr><td align="center"><img src="images/lprof.png" alt="LProf creating a profile." /></td></tr></table>
</body>
</html>
</html>
/trunk/Scribus/doc/en/importhints4.html
3,6 → 3,9
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8"/>
<title>Notes on Importing HTML into Scribus</title>
</head>
<style>
@import "manual.css";
</style>
<body>
<h2>Notes on Importing HTML into Scribus</h2>
 
59,4 → 62,4
</ul>
</p>
</body>
</html>
</html>
/trunk/Scribus/doc/en/color8.html
3,6 → 3,9
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8"/>
<title>Color Palettes in Scribus (6): Special Purpose Colors</title>
</head>
<style>
@import "manual.css";
</style>
<body>
<h2>Color Palettes in Scribus (6): Special Purpose Colors</h2>
<br>
47,4 → 50,4
</table>
 
</body>
</html>
</html>
/trunk/Scribus/doc/en/install.html
3,12 → 3,15
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8"/>
<title>Installation of Scribus</title>
</head>
<style>
@import "manual.css";
</style>
<body>
<h2>Installation of Scribus</h2>
 
<p>The installation process of Scribus depends on the operating system/distribution you are using. This is, of course, true for any program you may wish to install. </p>
<p><b>Linux:</b> On Linux, the easiest way to install Scribus is using a package manager like Yum, YaST or APT, as this method will resolve all dependencies automatically. If there are no pre-built Scribus packages for your Linux version available, you can either try installing an RPM oder DEB package by using the <code>alien</code> command or you have to <a href="install1.html">build from source</a>.</p>
<b>PC-BSD:</b> PBI packages for PC-BSD 9 and later are usually up-to-date. To install Scribus, launch PC-BSD&rsquo;s package manager <i>AppCafe</i> and enter &ldquo;Scribus&rdquo; into the &ldquo;Search&rdquo; field. <i>AppCafe</i> will then list the Scribus installation package. Click on the &ldquo;Install&rdquo; icon to let PC-BSD download and install Scribus. You can also download the PBI package to your hard drive and install it by double-clicking on it. <i>Please note that PBI packages comprise all dependencies for a given program, no matter whether they are already installed on the system, so these packages are quite huge &ndash; in the case of Scribus you will download an archive of more than 250 MB &ndash; so you better make sure to use a broadband connection.</i>
<p><b>PC-BSD:</b> PBI packages for PC-BSD 9 and later are usually up-to-date. To install Scribus, launch PC-BSD&rsquo;s package manager <i>AppCafe</i> and enter &ldquo;Scribus&rdquo; into the &ldquo;Search&rdquo; field. <i>AppCafe</i> will then list the Scribus installation package. Click on the &ldquo;Install&rdquo; icon to let PC-BSD download and install Scribus. You can also download the PBI package to your hard drive and install it by double-clicking on it. <i>Please note that PBI packages comprise all dependencies for a given program, no matter whether they are already installed on the system, so these packages are quite huge &ndash; in the case of Scribus you will download an archive of more than 250 MB &ndash; so you better make sure to use a broadband connection.</i></p>
<p><b>Other UNIX systems:</b> While Scribus is being ported to and packaged for other Unices, like Solaris, OpenIndiana or any of the BSDs (other than PC-BSD) it may take some time until the latest Scribus versions are available as packages, so users of these operating systems may prefer building Scribus from source.</p>
<p><b>Mac OS X:</b> DMGs and pkg files for Mac&nbsp;OS&nbsp;X 10.5 and later versions are available from our <a href="http://sourceforge.net/projects/scribus/files/">Sourceforge repository</a>. If your OS&nbsp;X version is older, you can try to install Scribus via Fink or try to build it from source.</p>
<p><b>Windows:</b> Installing Scribus on Windows works as with most Windows programs: There is one file with the extension *.exe that contains everything you need (except <a href="toolbox5.html">Ghostscript</a>). See the <a href="readme-win32.html">Windows README</a> for more information.</p>
/trunk/Scribus/doc/en/pdflavor.html
3,6 → 3,9
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8"/>
<title>PDF Flavors</title>
</head>
<style>
@import "manual.css";
</style>
<body>
<h2>PDF Flavors</h2>
 
43,4 → 46,4
</ul>
<p></p>
 
</qt>
</qt>
/trunk/Scribus/doc/en/toolbox7.html
3,6 → 3,9
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8"/>
<title>Advanced Ghostscript and GSview Hints</title>
</head>
<style>
@import "manual.css";
</style>
<body>
<h2>Advanced Ghostscript and GSview Hints</h2>
<p>One of the frustrations for users of RPM-based or commercially created distributions, is the lack of availability of the latest versions of Ghostscript(GS). Because of the differences in licensing between the GPL Ghostscript and AFPL Ghostscript, GPL Ghostscript releases usually follow by about a year, the release of the most up to date AFPL GS. Because, there are certain restrictions in AFPL, most Linux distributions ship an older and heavily patched version of GPL Ghostscript.</p>
92,4 → 95,4
<p>GSview has been, in my experience, the most reliable and versatile EPS/PS viewer on Linux. How good is it ? Well, the best example is letting you know this usually installed on every Windows DTP workstation I support for clients. For DTP with Scribus, I consider it essential.</p>
 
</body>
</html>
</html>
/trunk/Scribus/doc/en/settings1.html
3,6 → 3,9
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8"/>
<title>Document Settings and Preferences</title>
</head>
<style>
@import "manual.css";
</style>
<body>
<h2>Document Settings and Preferences</h2>
<p>Under the <em>File</em> heading on the menu bar, you will find two related entries, <strong>Document Setup</strong> and <strong>Preferences</strong>. Each of these brings up a dialog used for changing various default settings and other behavior in Scribus:</p>
/trunk/Scribus/doc/en/docinfo.html
3,6 → 3,9
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8"/>
<title>Scribus Document Information</title>
</head>
<style>
@import "manual.css";
</style>
<body>
<h2>Scribus Document Information</h2>
<h3>Overview</h3>
/trunk/Scribus/doc/en/faq1.html
3,6 → 3,9
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8"/>
<title>General Questions</title>
</head>
<style>
@import "manual.css";
</style>
<body>
<a name="top"></a>
<h2>General Questions</h2>
/trunk/Scribus/doc/en/collect4output.html
3,6 → 3,9
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8"/>
<title>Collect for Output</title>
</head>
<style>
@import "manual.css";
</style>
<body>
<h2>Collect for Output</h2>
<p><i>Collect for Output</i> is a specialized way of saving a Scribus document.</p>
/trunk/Scribus/doc/en/WwRenderframes.html
1,6 → 1,11
<html>
<head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8"/>
 
<title>Render Frames</title></head>
<style>
@import "manual.css";
</style>
<body>
<head><TITLE>Render Frames</TITLE></head>
<body>
<h2>Introduction</h2>
<p>Since version 1.3.5 Scribus offers a powerful new feature called Render Frames. Originally planned as a means to insert formulas into
Scribus documents, the inventor, Hermann Kraus, has enabled the creation of almost any kind of special typesetting, like formulas, musical notation or chess notation, from within Scribus. The trick here is that Scribus uses other programs in the background and imports their output into a special frame type called <b>Render Frames</b>.</p>
128,10 → 133,10
 
<p>To add a new configuration file, click on the &ldquo;Add&nbsp;&hellip;&rdquo; button, which will bring up a file dialog. Select your file and click &ldquo;Open.&rdquo; The file will then be added to your Render Frame configuration.</p>
<p>By moving entries of XML configuration files in the list up or down, you can change the order of entries in the editor&rsquo;s drop down list. If you want to use a different XML configuration file for a particular markup language (for example, if you need another default preamble for LaTeX frames in a project), you can change the path to the alternative file by clicking on &ldquo;Change&nbsp;&hellip;&rdquo; or simply add a new configuration file with an appropriate name, like &ldquo;MyLateX.&rdquo;</p>
<br>If you prefer another editor for your markup, for example if you can&rsquo;t live without Emacs or vi, or if the editor window is simply too small for you, you can override the built-in Scribus Render Frame Editor by using another editor like vi or Kate. Just insert the path to the executable file in the text field &ldquo;External Editor.&rdquo; The external editor won&rsquo;t override the Render Frame editor: As soon as you save your markup from the external editor, Scribus &ldquo;intercepts&rdquo; the data and renders the output into the frame or will display error messages in the &ldquo;Program Messages&rdquo; field. The interception also means that any change to the markup text won&rsquo;t be saved anywhere but in your Scribus file. If you haven&rsquo;t specified an external editor in <i>Preferences &lt; Tools</i>, Scribus will display an error message:</p>
<br></br>
<p>If you prefer another editor for your markup, for example if you can&rsquo;t live without Emacs or vi, or if the editor window is simply too small for you, you can override the built-in Scribus Render Frame Editor by using another editor like vi or Kate. Just insert the path to the executable file in the text field &ldquo;External Editor.&rdquo; The external editor won&rsquo;t override the Render Frame editor: As soon as you save your markup from the external editor, Scribus &ldquo;intercepts&rdquo; the data and renders the output into the frame or will display error messages in the &ldquo;Program Messages&rdquo; field. The interception also means that any change to the markup text won&rsquo;t be saved anywhere but in your Scribus file. If you haven&rsquo;t specified an external editor in <i>Preferences &lt; Tools</i>, Scribus will display an error message:</p>
<br />
<table width="100%"><tr><td align="center"><img src="images/rf-error3.png"/></td></tr></table>
<br></br>
<br />
<p>In addition, you have the option to start with an empty frame. By checking &ldquo;Force DPI,&rdquo; Scribus will render the output of every Render Frame with the resolution set in the spinbox to the right. It's set to 72 dpi by default for performance reasons. If you want to produce a document for professional printing, you will want to choose a higher resolution.</p>
</body>
</html>
</html>
/trunk/Scribus/doc/en/intro.html
3,6 → 3,9
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8"/>
<title>Preface</title>
</head>
<style>
@import "manual.css";
</style>
<body>
<h2>Preface</h2>
 
/trunk/Scribus/doc/en/pdfexport4.html
3,6 → 3,9
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8"/>
<title>Creating PDF Presentations</title>
</head>
<style>
@import "manual.css";
</style>
<body>
<h2>Creating PDF Presentations</h2>
<h3>Presentation PDFs</h3>
34,4 → 37,4
<table width="100%"><tr><td align="center"><img src="images/scribus-pres2.png" title="PDF Effects" alt="PDf Effects"/></td></tr></table>
 
</body>
</html>
</html>
/trunk/Scribus/doc/en/toolbox19.html
3,6 → 3,9
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8"/>
<title>Commandline Tools</title>
</head>
<style>
@import "manual.css";
</style>
<body>
 
<h2>Commandline Tools</h2>
107,4 → 110,4
 
 
</body>
</html>
</html>
/trunk/Scribus/doc/en/WwShapes.html
3,30 → 3,32
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8"/>
<title>Working with Shapes & Polygons</title>
</head>
 
<style>
@import "manual.css";
</style>
<body>
<h2>Working with Shapes & Polygons</h2>
<p>In <a href="WwFrames.html">Working with Frames</a> there is information on manipulation of frames which is applicable to all frame types. There we only explained how to start creation of shapes and polygons by using the appropriate toolbar icon, or using keyboard <b>S</b> or <b>P</b>.</p>
<p>With shapes and polygons, you have a number of choices to make with each about what kind of shape or polygon to create. All of these are vector drawings, so you can freely resize or edit them after creation. Let&rsquo;s start with shapes.</p>
 
In <a href="WwFrames.html">Working with Frames</a> there is information on manipulation of frames which is applicable to all frame types. There we only explained how to start creation of shapes and polygons by using the appropriate toolbar icon, or using keyboard <b>S</b> or <b>P</b>.
<p>With shapes and polygons, you have a number of choices to make with each about what kind of shape or polygon to create. All of these are vector drawings, so you can freely resize or edit them after creation. Let&rsquo;s start with shapes.
 
<h3>Shapes</h3>
<table cellpadding=5><tr>
<td>Shapes are a collection of predetermined shapes, and with version 1.4.x have been greatly increased in number. The default shape when you start Scribus is the simple rectangular shape which the icon shows. Just to the right side of the shape figure on the toolbar is an arrow for a drop down list of subselections. Once you select from a drop down category and specific type (click with the mouse), you see the toolbar icon change to your selected shape. <i>Note: the appearance of the Shapes icons has been enhanced in the image to the right &ndash; they will not appear as distinct as this.</i>
<p>As stated in Working with Frames, the default line and fill color for shapes and polygons is &ldquo;None.&rdquo; You can change that for the current documents in <i>File > Document Setup > Tools > Shape (icon)</i>, and for future documents in <i>File > Preferences > Tools > Shape (icon)</i>.
<p>Just like other frames, you simply click-drag from one corner of the shape to its opposite. If you hold down Shift while click-dragging, when you let up on the mouse the shape will fill to the margins of your page.</td><td>
<td><p>Shapes are a collection of predetermined shapes, and with version 1.4.x have been greatly increased in number. The default shape when you start Scribus is the simple rectangular shape which the icon shows. Just to the right side of the shape figure on the toolbar is an arrow for a drop down list of subselections. Once you select from a drop down category and specific type (click with the mouse), you see the toolbar icon change to your selected shape. <i>Note: the appearance of the Shapes icons has been enhanced in the image to the right &ndash; they will not appear as distinct as this.</i></p>
<p>As stated in Working with Frames, the default line and fill color for shapes and polygons is &ldquo;None.&rdquo; You can change that for the current documents in <i>File > Document Setup > Tools > Shape (icon)</i>, and for future documents in <i>File > Preferences > Tools > Shape (icon)</i>.</p>
<p>Just like other frames, you simply click-drag from one corner of the shape to its opposite. If you hold down Shift while click-dragging, when you let up on the mouse the shape will fill to the margins of your page.</p></td><td>
<img src="images/shapes8.png" ALT="Shapes Drop-down lists" ALIGN=right></td>
</tr>
</table>
 
<table cellpadding=5 width="80%"><tr><td><img src="images/shapes7.png" ALT="Enter Object Size Dialog"></td>
<td>Another option with shapes is to make your selection from the list, then simply click on the page, i.e., do not drag the mouse. This brings up a new dialog, <b>Enter Object Size</b>, in which you can make a shape of pre-determined dimensions.
<p>This would be useful, for example, for making an exact square or circle. The <b>Origin</b> relates to the point on the page where you clicked to bring up this dialog.
<td><p>Another option with shapes is to make your selection from the list, then simply click on the page, i.e., do not drag the mouse. This brings up a new dialog, <b>Enter Object Size</b>, in which you can make a shape of pre-determined dimensions.</p>
<p>This would be useful, for example, for making an exact square or circle. The <b>Origin</b> relates to the point on the page where you clicked to bring up this dialog.</p>
</td></tr>
</table>
<br clear=all>
<h3>Polygons</h3>
<table cellpadding=5><tr>
<td>Polygons in Scribus are regular polygons, which when drawn with equal width and height dimensions, will have equal sides and angles. Default is for 4 sides (corners), although you may have anything from 3 to 999 sides. The Polygons icon will always show a pentagon, but by selecting Properties from the drop-down you get the dialog to the right. As you see, your choices here are restricted to the geometry of the polygon. You can set defaults for line and fill colors and shading, and line thickness in <i>File > Preferences > Tools > Shape (icon)</i> or in <i>File > Document Settings > Tools > Shape (icon)</i>. Your choices in <i>File > Preferences > Tools > Polygon (icon)</i> and in <i>File > Document Settings > Tools > Polygon (icon)</i> will be limited to what you see here in the <i>Polygon Properties</i> dialog.
<td><p>Polygons in Scribus are regular polygons, which when drawn with equal width and height dimensions, will have equal sides and angles. Default is for 4 sides (corners), although you may have anything from 3 to 999 sides. The Polygons icon will always show a pentagon, but by selecting Properties from the drop-down you get the dialog to the right. As you see, your choices here are restricted to the geometry of the polygon. You can set defaults for line and fill colors and shading, and line thickness in <i>File > Preferences > Tools > Shape (icon)</i> or in <i>File > Document Settings > Tools > Shape (icon)</i>. Your choices in <i>File > Preferences > Tools > Polygon (icon)</i> and in <i>File > Document Settings > Tools > Polygon (icon)</i> will be limited to what you see here in the <i>Polygon Properties</i> dialog.</p>
<p>In 1.5+ we have new settings for <i>Polygon Properties</i>. Number of <b>Corners</b> and <b>Rotation</b> need no explanation, but note that the rotation can be set in the spinbox or with the slider.</p>
<p><b>Apply Factor</b> allows the usage of the remaining settings. In this example, setting the <b>Factor</b> less than 0% causes the sides to bend inward in the middle. The <b>Inner Rotation</b> setting has shifted the bending points clockwise, and finally, <b>Outer Curvature</b> causes the line segments to bend outward.</p>
</td>
33,11 → 35,11
<td><img src="images/polygons.png" ALT="Polygon Properties" ALIGN=right></td></tr>
</table>
<p>The best way to learn what the various settings do is simply to play with them then see the results. If you draw your polygon with unequal width and height, you will see various kinds of distortions compared to the small preview window.</p>
<p>Just as with shapes, if you activate the polygons icon, then click the canvas, you will get the <b>Enter Object Size</b> dialog.
<p>Just as with shapes, if you activate the polygons icon, then click the canvas, you will get the <b>Enter Object Size</b> dialog.</p>
 
<h3>Context Menu</h3>
<table cellpadding=5><tr><td><img src="images/context_shape.png" ALT="Context Menu Shapes" ALIGN=right></td>
<td>The context menu with shapes and polygons has fewer choices than with text or image frames.
<td><p>The context menu with shapes and polygons has fewer choices than with text or image frames.</p>
<ul>
<li><b>Undo</b> is active only when there is some operation on the frame which can be undone.</li>
<li><b>Redo</b> is only present when some action has been undone.</li>
58,5 → 60,5
</td</tr>
</table>
<h4>Editing Shapes</h4>
This will be handled in <a href="EditingShapes.html">its own section</a>, since it has much greater applicability than just to geometric figures.
<p>This will be handled in <a href="EditingShapes.html">its own section</a>, since it has much greater applicability than just to geometric figures.</p>
</html>
/trunk/Scribus/doc/en/importhints1.html
3,6 → 3,9
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8"/>
<title>Importing EPS</title>
</head>
<style>
@import "manual.css";
</style>
<body>
<h2>Importing EPS</h2>
<h3>What is EPS?</h3>
63,4 → 66,4
<h3>Special EPS files</h3>
<p>Some EPS files cannot be opened by Scribus at all, despite being 100% compliant to the specification. These files serve special purposes and may not have any image contents at all. For example, color palette files from commercial vendors are often shipped as EPS files, because these palettes can be read by most graphics programs, including Scribus. Their only content is a list of colors. Other examples are symbol or pattern libraries for Adobe Illustrator. The content of these files will be loaded into the respective resource dialogs in Illustrator, but it can&rsquo;t be accessed directly by most other programs, including Scribus.</p>
</body>
</html>
</html>
/trunk/Scribus/doc/en/color5.html
3,6 → 3,9
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8"/>
<title>Color Palettes in Scribus (3): Resene&reg; Colors</title>
</head>
<style>
@import "manual.css";
</style>
<body>
<h2>Color Palettes in Scribus (3): Resene&reg; Colors</h2>
<p><a href="http://www.resene.co.nz">Resene Paints Limited</a> is a New Zealand-based color vendor, and as the name suggests, concentrates on coatings, paints and other colors for interior design, with its main markets in the Pacific region, especially Australia and New Zealand. The focus on areas other than printing doesn&rsquo;t mean that the color sets are useless in Scribus &ndash; quite the contrary. If they were, the Scribus Team wouldn&rsquo;t bother including them in the first place. First of all it should be noted that in many cases a close matching between corporate or organizational colors on different levels is required, from coatings to print products. Second, Resene, just like other color manufacturers, provides color charts, which allow for easily verifying colors with a printer. Third, there is the aesthetic facet of Resene palettes, as they consist of carefully chosen and lively colors that can add to the appeal of your layout.</p><br>
11,9 → 14,9
 
<h3>Specifics of Resene&reg; Palettes in Scribus</h3>
<h4>General</h4>
<a>Resene color sets belong to the standardized palettes that are &ldquo;locked&rdquo;, i.e., <a href="color2.html">protected</a> from inadvertent editing. All colors are stored as <a href="color1.html">spot colors</a> with alternative RGB values, the reason being that they are derived from palette files for a CAD software that doesn&rsquo;t support the CMYK color space. It is probably safer to either use a Resene color as a spot color or to convert the original RGB values to CMYK during <a href="pdfexport1.html">PDF export</a> using a <a href="cms.html">color profile</a>. If you need &ldquo;raw&rdquo; CMYK values, you can either <a href="color1.html">edit</a> a color and change the color space or visit Resene&rsquo;s <a href="http://www.resene.co.nz/swatches/">website</a> for alternative CMYK values, but you should be aware of the fact that &ldquo;raw&rdquo; CMYK data without an associated color profile can turn out to be inaccurate in commercial printing.</p>
<p>Resene color sets belong to the standardized palettes that are &ldquo;locked&rdquo;, i.e., <a href="color2.html">protected</a> from inadvertent editing. All colors are stored as <a href="color1.html">spot colors</a> with alternative RGB values, the reason being that they are derived from palette files for a CAD software that doesn&rsquo;t support the CMYK color space. It is probably safer to either use a Resene color as a spot color or to convert the original RGB values to CMYK during <a href="pdfexport1.html">PDF export</a> using a <a href="cms.html">color profile</a>. If you need &ldquo;raw&rdquo; CMYK values, you can either <a href="color1.html">edit</a> a color and change the color space or visit Resene&rsquo;s <a href="http://www.resene.co.nz/swatches/">website</a> for alternative CMYK values, but you should be aware of the fact that &ldquo;raw&rdquo; CMYK data without an associated color profile can turn out to be inaccurate in commercial printing.</p>
<h4>Updates</h4>
<p>Resene color collections are updated on a regular basis, and thanks to an arrangement with the company, Scribus users will receive updated versions of the palettes with every new Scribus release. As you have already learned, this won&rsquo;t affect documents that use older palette versions, since they are <a href="color1.html">stored in the documents themselves</a>, from which they can be imported into your current file. If you, for whatever reason, need to use an older Resene color set, perhaps even a palette that pre-dates the inclusion of Resene palettes in Scribus, you can <a href="http://www.resene.co.nz/comn/services/cad_colour_books.htm">download</a> the palette as an AutoCAD color book file (*.acb) and use <a href="toolbox17.html">Swatchbooker</a> to convert it into a Scribus XML palette file.</p>
 
</body>
</html>
</html>
/trunk/Scribus/doc/en/gsview.html
5,7 → 5,11
<title>GSview and Scribus</title>
 
</head><body>
</head>
<style>
@import "manual.css";
</style>
<body>
<h2>GSview*</h2>
 
<p>One important thing to note is that <a href="http://pages.cs.wisc.edu/%7Eghost/gsview/index.htm">GSview</a> <span style="font-style: italic;">must not be confused</span> with <strong style="font-weight: normal;">ghostview, gv and their derivatives!</strong>
92,4 → 96,4
Ghostscript for his hints and patiently answering questions about
GSview and Ghostscript.</span></p>
 
</body></html>
</body></html>
/trunk/Scribus/doc/en/color7a.html
3,6 → 3,9
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8"/>
<title>Color Palettes in Scribus (6): Galaxy Gauge Colors</title>
</head>
<style>
@import "manual.css";
</style>
<body>
<h2>Color Palettes in Scribus (6): Galaxy Gauge&trade; Colors</h2>
 
37,4 → 40,4
<br>
<br>
</body>
</html>
</html>
/trunk/Scribus/doc/en/toolbox4.html
3,6 → 3,9
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8"/>
<title>GIMP 2.x</title>
</head>
<style>
@import "manual.css";
</style>
<body>
<h2>GIMP 2.x</h2>
 
/trunk/Scribus/doc/en/fonts2.html
3,6 → 3,9
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8"/>
<title><title>Scribus Font Tools (2)</title></title>
</head>
<style>
@import "manual.css";
</style>
<body>
<h2>Scribus Font Tools (2)</h2>
<h3>The Font Preview</h3>
/trunk/Scribus/doc/en/keys.html
3,6 → 3,9
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8"/>
<title>Keyboard Shortcut Settings</title>
</head>
<style>
@import "manual.css";
</style>
<body>
<h2>Keyboard Shortcut Settings</h2>
<p>See also: <a href="mouse.html">Mouse Usage Hints</a><strong> Note:</strong> Keyboard Short Cuts are completely customizable and can be exported for use on other machines under the Keyboard <a href="settings1.html">Preferences</a>.</p>
/trunk/Scribus/doc/en/print3.html
3,6 → 3,10
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8"/>
<title>Printing Tools (2): The Print Dialog</title>
</head>
<style>
@import "manual.css";
</style>
<body>
<h2>Printing Tools (2): The Print Dialog</h2>
<p>If your printing device and your operating system&rsquo;s printing subsystem support direct printing from within Scribus, especially if the device is a PostScript printer, Scribus offers some extra printing features not available in most other programs. It&rsquo;s important to note (again) that the availability of those features depends on the quality of the device driver. Moreover, at least on Windows, where Scribus uses the &ldquo;Graphical Device Interface&rdquo; it also depends on the features that have been made <i>accessible</i> through the device driver by the manufacturer. For reasons of usability, the number of options may have been consciously limited on this operating system. Below we will describe the Print Dialog for operating systems that use the CUPS printing system (Linux, *BSD, UNIX, Mac&nbsp;OS&nbsp;X).</p><br>
<table width="100%"><tr><td align="center"><img src="images/print-dialog1.png" alt="The Print Dialog" title="The Print Dialog"/></td></tr></table>
/trunk/Scribus/doc/en/importhints.html
3,6 → 3,9
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8"/>
<title>Importing Content into Scribus</title>
</head>
<style>
@import "manual.css";
</style>
<body>
<h2>Importing Content into Scribus</h2>
<p>As you have <a href="about2.html">learned</a>, DTP is about assembling content in a visually pleasing manner. Thus, <b>importing content</b> is a major part of your workflow. This chapter is meant to assist you in getting external content into your document in the most efficient way, as well as helping you to avoid mistakes, either on your side or on the side of contributors.</p>
/trunk/Scribus/doc/en/fileproblems.html
3,6 → 3,9
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8"/>
<title>Problems with Opening Scribus Files</title>
</head>
<style>
@import "manual.css";
</style>
<body>
<h2>Problems with Opening Scribus Files</h2>
 
/trunk/Scribus/doc/en/qsg.html
1,3 → 1,12
<html>
<head>
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8"/>
<title>Scribus Quick Start Guide</title>
</head>
<style>
@import "manual.css";
</style>
<body>
<h1> Scribus Quick Start Guide</h1>
<p>Before we start explaining Scribus in depth, it might be useful to get a &ldquo;feeling&rdquo; for the way Scribus works. For that purpose, you can see how a simple front page of a magazine for an imaginary Rembrandt exhibition is being created. If you want to follow the description provided here, you need:
</p>
139,3 → 148,5
</p>
 
<table width="100%"><tr><td align="center"><img src="images/Cover_en1-page1.png"/></td></tr></table>
</body>
</html>
/trunk/Scribus/doc/en/short-words.html
4,6 → 4,9
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" />
<title>Short Words</title>
</head>
<style>
@import "manual.css";
</style>
<body>
<h2>Short Words</h2>
 
40,4 → 43,4
<h3>Important</h3>
<p>The Scribus Team is eager to extend the global configuration file to meet as many needs as there are users who want the typographical rules of their particular language to be available in Scribus. In case you have created a reliable configuration file for your language, we&rsquo;d be happy to distribute it with Scribus, so that your work can be shared with and improved by others.</p>
</body>
</html>
</html>
/trunk/Scribus/doc/en/about1.html
2,7 → 2,11
 
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8">
<title>About the Scribus Team</title>
</head><body>
</head>
<style>
@import "manual.css";
</style>
<body>
<h2>About the Scribus Team (in order of joining)</h2>
 
<p><b>Franz Schmid (fschmid):</b> &ldquo;Our Linus&nbsp;&hellip;&rdquo;. The original author and main coder; software developer for a manufacturing company.</p>
/trunk/Scribus/doc/en/install5.html
5,6 → 5,9
<title>Compiling and Installing Scribus 1.4+ on Mac&nbsp;OS&nbsp;X</title>
</head>
 
<style>
@import "manual.css";
</style>
<body>
<h2>Compiling and Installing Scribus 1.4+ on Mac&nbsp;OS&nbsp;X</h2>
 
/trunk/Scribus/doc/en/pdfexport1.html
3,6 → 3,9
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8"/>
<title>PDF Exporting from Scribus</title>
</head>
<style>
@import "manual.css";
</style>
<body>
<h2>PDF Exporting from Scribus</h2>
 
/trunk/Scribus/doc/en/otherinfo.html
3,6 → 3,9
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8"/>
<title>Other Information</title>
</head>
<style>
@import "manual.css";
</style>
<body>
<h2>Other Information</h2>
 
/trunk/Scribus/doc/en/toolbox16.html
3,6 → 3,9
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8"/>
<title>Fontmatrix</title>
</head>
<style>
@import "manual.css";
</style>
<body>
<h2>Fontmatrix</h2>
<p>For those coming from MacOSX or an even older MacOS version, one of the perceived missing parts on Linux is a nice graphical font manager. Enter <a href="http://fontmatrix.net">Fontmatrix</a>. While it is young, it has all the essentials to manage fonts both individually and in groups via &ldquo;tags&rdquo;. Fontmatrix also has some nice features to preview fonts via sample text, and to do so at scalable sizes, along with the ability to view individual glyphs. Even better, Fontmatrix supports OpenType fonts very well, and in the future even more Open Type features will be added.</p>
/trunk/Scribus/doc/en/readme-os2.html
3,6 → 3,9
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8"/>
<title>Scribus on OS/2 &#174; and eComStation&#8482; </title>
</head>
<style>
@import "manual.css";
</style>
<body>
<h2>Scribus on OS/2 Warp4&#0174; and eComStation&#0153;</h2>
 
/trunk/Scribus/doc/en/color2.html
3,6 → 3,9
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8"/>
<title>Managing Color Sets</title>
</head>
<style>
@import "manual.css";
</style>
<body>
<h2>Managing Color Sets</h2>
<h3>Changing the Default Color Palette</h3>
13,8 → 16,8
<p>In the dialog you can select a new default palette for <i>new</i> documents. Any change you make here will not affect existing documents, as the color palette in such a document has been <a href="color1.html">stored</a> in the document itself. Some of the color palettes shipped with Scribus have been created for special purposes, so before you select another default palette, you should learn something about the color sets from the descriptions provided in subsequent sections. In some cases, your printer or a client may insist on the use of certain colors.</p>
<blockquote>
<h4><font color="red">Caution!</font></h4>
<p>Previous versions of the documentation have indicated that colors in the color sets included with Scribus are locked &ndash; this may not be the case, since it is dependent on where the palettes are stored on your system, and whether you have write access there. If you are editing colors with no document open, with a customized location for Scribus, you may be able to edit any color from any palette. If you then click <strong>OK</strong>, you have changed this palette for future use. On the other hand, if you have a document open, make such a change and <strong>OK</strong>, you will only change this color for that particular document. Even so, it is probably not a good idea to do this, so that you avoid confusion, since if you import something from that document to another, there may be unexpected problems due to the color name clash.</p>
<p>For proprietary spot colors, the color name will dictate what will be applied, so changing its appearance in Scribus will be another source of confusion and error.</p>
Previous versions of the documentation have indicated that colors in the color sets included with Scribus are locked &ndash; this may not be the case, since it is dependent on where the palettes are stored on your system, and whether you have write access there. If you are editing colors with no document open, with a customized location for Scribus, you may be able to edit any color from any palette. If you then click <strong>OK</strong>, you have changed this palette for future use. On the other hand, if you have a document open, make such a change and <strong>OK</strong>, you will only change this color for that particular document. Even so, it is probably not a good idea to do this, so that you avoid confusion, since if you import something from that document to another, there may be unexpected problems due to the color name clash.
<br />For proprietary spot colors, the color name will dictate what will be applied, so changing its appearance in Scribus will be another source of confusion and error.
</blockquote>
<p>What you might notice immediately when you open the dialog is that you can&rsquo;t edit any color in one of the palettes that are shipped with Scribus (most likely with a standard Linux installation). This is a feature, not a bug, as the very purpose of standardized colors is to work across documents, computers or platforms with identical colors, which in turn have unique color values and color names. Thus, all color palettes that have been installed to directories to which you have read-only access are &ldquo;locked&rdquo;, i.e. prevented from editing.</p>
<p>Sometimes, however, there are good reasons to edit a locked palette anyway, for example, if you need to reduce the number of colors in a palette for a certain project, i.e. if you need to create a &ldquo;project palette&rdquo;. In such a case you can click on the &ldquo;Save Color Set&rdquo; icon in the Color Manager. This will save the palette to your home directory and will add the copy to the list of available color sets. If you select the copy of the palette, you will notice that the editing options are now available. Be aware, though, that clicking &ldquo;OK&rdquo; will make all changes to the copy permanent!</p><br>
/trunk/Scribus/doc/en/WwStyles.html
3,6 → 3,9
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8"/>
<title>Working with Styles</title>
</head>
<style>
@import "manual.css";
</style>
<body>
<h2>Working with Styles</h2>
Why would someone want to use styles, or why might they be a good idea? Just what are styles in Scribus?
13,38 → 16,38
<h3>Paragraph Styles</h3>
<table width="80%" cellpadding="5">
<tr><td rowspan="3"><img src="images/style_manager1.png"></td>
<td>When you open the styles dialog, it may have the appearance you see here or be expanded. We&rsquo;ll imagine that we want to create two styles for a newsletter, one style for headings/titles, and another for body text. We want headings to stand out from the body text, and the body text should be pleasing to the eye and have easy legibility &ndash; we will not spend time on the pros and cons of font choice in various settings, since many factors may be involved.</td></tr>
<td><p>When you open the styles dialog, it may have the appearance you see here or be expanded. We&rsquo;ll imagine that we want to create two styles for a newsletter, one style for headings/titles, and another for body text. We want headings to stand out from the body text, and the body text should be pleasing to the eye and have easy legibility &ndash; we will not spend time on the pros and cons of font choice in various settings, since many factors may be involved.</p></td></tr>
<tr><td><img src="images/style_manager1b.png"></td>
</tr>
<tr><td>Click the <b>New</b> button for the drop-down list and select <b>Paragraph Style</b>. The default name will be <i>New Style</i>. Initially, the <i>Properties</i> tab will be active, and as you can see, this has settings for various attributes of our glyphs in relationship to lines, other paragraphs, the margins and tabulators, but nothing about the font itself.</td></tr>
<tr><td><p>Click the <b>New</b> button for the drop-down list and select <b>Paragraph Style</b>. The default name will be <i>New Style</i>. Initially, the <i>Properties</i> tab will be active, and as you can see, this has settings for various attributes of our glyphs in relationship to lines, other paragraphs, the margins and tabulators, but nothing about the font itself.</p></td></tr>
</table>
<img src="images/style_manager3b.png">
<p>We will not cover various items that you will find in <a href="WwText.html">Working with Text</a>, but mainly focus here on settings that are <i>not</i> in the Text tab of the Properties palette.
<p>Underneath the linespacing settings we see two spinboxes for determining the white space above and below the paragraph this style is used for. Any space setting will add to the space set for the preceding or following paragraphs.
<p>Down below the tabulator settings we also saw in Properties are spinboxes which control indentation.
<p>On the left-top, we can set the indentation of the first line of a paragraph <i>relative to the left margin of the paragraph</i>. Assign a negative value for so-called hanging indent.
<p>On the left-bottom, we set any paragraph-wide indentation from the other settings of the frame &ndash; this include the border of the frame and also any left text distance setting for the frame &ndash; this defines the left margin of the paragraph as just mentioned. You can only set for a hanging indent when this value has some positive number, and the absolute value of the hanging indent can be no larger than this value. <i>Example: if you want a hanging indent of -15 pts, you will need a paragraph margin setting of 15 pts or greater.</i>
<p>Finally, on the right, we have the right margin of the paragraph, analogous to the paragraph-wide left indentation just mentioned.
<p>
<p>We will not cover various items that you will find in <a href="WwText.html">Working with Text</a>, but mainly focus here on settings that are <i>not</i> in the Text tab of the Properties palette.</p>
<p>Underneath the linespacing settings we see two spinboxes for determining the white space above and below the paragraph this style is used for. Any space setting will add to the space set for the preceding or following paragraphs.</p>
<p>Down below the tabulator settings we also saw in Properties are spinboxes which control indentation.</p>
<p>On the left-top, we can set the indentation of the first line of a paragraph <i>relative to the left margin of the paragraph</i>. Assign a negative value for so-called hanging indent.</p>
<p>On the left-bottom, we set any paragraph-wide indentation from the other settings of the frame &ndash; this include the border of the frame and also any left text distance setting for the frame &ndash; this defines the left margin of the paragraph as just mentioned. You can only set for a hanging indent when this value has some positive number, and the absolute value of the hanging indent can be no larger than this value. <i>Example: if you want a hanging indent of -15 pts, you will need a paragraph margin setting of 15 pts or greater.</i></p>
<p>Finally, on the right, we have the right margin of the paragraph, analogous to the paragraph-wide left indentation just mentioned.</p>
<p></p>
<table width="70%">
<tr><td valign="top">Here we show a hanging indent and extra space above paragraphs &ndash; note that the space above paragraph does not apply to the first paragraph in the frame.</td>
<tr><td valign="top"><p>Here we show a hanging indent and extra space above paragraphs &ndash; note that the space above paragraph does not apply to the first paragraph in the frame.</p></td>
<td><img src="images/style_manager7.png"></td>
</tr></table>
<h4>Drop Caps</h4>
<table width="70%">
<tr><td valign="top">Drop caps are enlarged first letters of a paragraph, which overlap two or more lines of text. The value for <b>Lines</b> must be an integer.
<p>The <b>Distance from Text</b> applies to the space to the right of the enlarged letter. This distance can be a negative number, even though it would seem that might have limited utility.
<p>Here we see examples of drop caps, the top and middle with a distance from text of 0, and in the bottom paragraph a distance of 10 pts. The middle paragraph has the drop cap set at 3 lines, and also uses a hanging indent for additional effect.
<p>Drop caps can be a very interesting visual effect, but do not lend to easy legibility, so in general should be used sparingly.</td>
<tr><td valign="top"><p>Drop caps are enlarged first letters of a paragraph, which overlap two or more lines of text. The value for <b>Lines</b> must be an integer.</p>
<p>The <b>Distance from Text</b> applies to the space to the right of the enlarged letter. This distance can be a negative number, even though it would seem that might have limited utility.</p>
<p>Here we see examples of drop caps, the top and middle with a distance from text of 0, and in the bottom paragraph a distance of 10 pts. The middle paragraph has the drop cap set at 3 lines, and also uses a hanging indent for additional effect.</p>
<p>Drop caps can be a very interesting visual effect, but do not lend to easy legibility, so in general should be used sparingly.</p></td>
<td><img src="images/style_manager8.png"></td>
</tr>
</table>
<h3>Character Style</h3>
<table width="80%">
<tr><td valign="top">Here we see the Character Style tab in Style Manager &ndash; now we can set the various font attributes and glyph modifications. Almost all of these settings have their counterparts in the Text tab of Properties palette, so check <a href="WwText.html">Working with Text</a> for their explanation.
<p>The exception is the far-right spinbox in the upper row of spinboxes, next to Tracking. This sets the default width of the space character or glyph (keep in mind that a space is a glyph, but in contrast, a tab is not). It does not affect the space between all glyphs, such as is done with the tracking setting.
<p>If one is simply trying to create a character style not associated with a paragraph style, then you will only see this tab with its choices. Character styles can only be applied in the main window, i.e., there is no way to apply a character style in Story Editor &ndash; only a paragraph style with its associated character style may be used.
<p>There is a hierarchy to text formatting styles, in that a character style will override a paragraph style, even if it is applied to an entire frame, such as one might do in <i>Select Item</i> mode. This hierarchy is also something to keep in mind if you are trying to apply a paragraph style in Story Editor and it doesn&rsquo;t seem to be working.
<tr><td valign="top"><p>Here we see the Character Style tab in Style Manager &ndash; now we can set the various font attributes and glyph modifications. Almost all of these settings have their counterparts in the Text tab of Properties palette, so check <a href="WwText.html">Working with Text</a> for their explanation.</p>
<p>The exception is the far-right spinbox in the upper row of spinboxes, next to Tracking. This sets the default width of the space character or glyph (keep in mind that a space is a glyph, but in contrast, a tab is not). It does not affect the space between all glyphs, such as is done with the tracking setting.</p>
<p>If one is simply trying to create a character style not associated with a paragraph style, then you will only see this tab with its choices. Character styles can only be applied in the main window, i.e., there is no way to apply a character style in Story Editor &ndash; only a paragraph style with its associated character style may be used.</p>
<p>There is a hierarchy to text formatting styles, in that a character style will override a paragraph style, even if it is applied to an entire frame, such as one might do in <i>Select Item</i> mode. This hierarchy is also something to keep in mind if you are trying to apply a paragraph style in Story Editor and it doesn&rsquo;t seem to be working.</p>
</td>
<td><img src="images/style_manager9.png"></td>
</tr>
51,10 → 54,10
</table>
<h3>Importing Styles</h3>
<table width="80%">
<tr><td valign="top">If you click the <b>Import</b> button on the Style Manager dialog, you will then get a file dialog to select a Scribus file for style importation. While you could select any kind of file, styles will only be found in Scribus files &ndash; there will be no error message.
<p>As seen here, you can then select which styles you wish to import, and can make sure there are no name conflicts. Renaming is an automatic process with this dialog, but of course you can rename the style once it&rsquo;s imported into your document.
<p><i>Hint #1: You might consider creating some files which are empty documents, but contain a collection of styles for use in other documents.</i>
<p><i>Hint #2 for those who like to dissect .sla files: You will also find that, for the purposes of importing a style, you can strip out everything from a file except for the following tags: the &lt;?xml...&gt;, &lt;SCRIBUSUTF8NEW...&gt;,&lt;DOCUMENT....&gt;, &lt;STYLE.....&gt; (however many), &lt;/DOCUMENT&gt;, and &lt;/SCRIBUSUTF8NEW&gt; tags, and still have something that the styles can be imported from. Do not try to load this as a document, however.</i>
<tr><td valign="top"><p>If you click the <b>Import</b> button on the Style Manager dialog, you will then get a file dialog to select a Scribus file for style importation. While you could select any kind of file, styles will only be found in Scribus files &ndash; there will be no error message.</p>
<p>As seen here, you can then select which styles you wish to import, and can make sure there are no name conflicts. Renaming is an automatic process with this dialog, but of course you can rename the style once it&rsquo;s imported into your document.</p>
<p><i>Hint #1: You might consider creating some files which are empty documents, but contain a collection of styles for use in other documents.</i></p>
<p><i>Hint #2 for those who like to dissect .sla files: You will also find that, for the purposes of importing a style, you can strip out everything from a file except for the following tags: the &lt;?xml...&gt;, &lt;SCRIBUSUTF8NEW...&gt;,&lt;DOCUMENT....&gt;, &lt;STYLE.....&gt; (however many), &lt;/DOCUMENT&gt;, and &lt;/SCRIBUSUTF8NEW&gt; tags, and still have something that the styles can be imported from. Do not try to load this as a document, however.</i></p>
</td>
<td><img src="images/style_manager10.png"></td>
</tr></table>
/trunk/Scribus/doc/en/toolbox1.html
3,7 → 3,10
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8"/>
<title>Adobe Reader </title>
</head>
<A>
<style>
@import "manual.css";
</style>
<body>
<h2>Adobe Reader</h2>
 
<p>Adobe Reader is one of the essential tools to have when using Scribus. Although mostly a viewing application, it has some advanced features that no other PDF viewer has, such as full support for JavaScript with a PDF and detailed information about what is embedded in the PDF. Some documents can only reliably be viewed in Adobe Reader.</p>
/trunk/Scribus/doc/en/developers.html
3,6 → 3,9
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8"/>
<title>For Developers</title>
</head>
<style>
@import "manual.css";
</style>
<body>
<h2>For Developers</h2>
 
/trunk/Scribus/doc/en/toolbox9.html
3,6 → 3,9
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8"/>
<title>Inkscape</title>
</head>
<style>
@import "manual.css";
</style>
<body>
<h2>Inkscape</h2>
 
/trunk/Scribus/doc/en/hyphenator.html
3,6 → 3,9
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8"/>
<title>Hyphenation and Spellchecking</title>
</head>
<style>
@import "manual.css";
</style>
<body>
<h2>Hyphenation and Spellchecking</h2>
<h3>Hyphenation</h3>
/trunk/Scribus/doc/en/WwImages.html
1,15 → 1,19
<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN">
<html><head>
 
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8"><title>Working with Images</title></head><body>
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8"><title>Working with Images</title>
</head>
<style>
@import "manual.css";
</style>
<body>
<h2>Working with Images</h2>
 
See <a href="WwFrames.html">Working with Frames</a>
<p>See <a href="WwFrames.html">Working with Frames</a>
to learn about Image Frame frame creation and manipulation. Note that
the image frame shows as a red border with small square handles at the
corners and at the midpoints of each side. Diagonals in black are drawn
to indicate that it is an image frame. Note that these small square
handles disappear when the frame is locked.
handles disappear when the frame is locked.</p>
<p>The quickest way to load an image into the frame is to right-click on the frame, and select <b>Get Image</b> from the Context Menu. Pressing Ctrl+I or menu <i>File &gt; Import &gt; Get Image</i>
will also work. A file dialog will appear, showing the image types that
Scribus can import, which include bitmap formats like TIFF, PNG and
16,14 → 20,11
JPG, as well as vector/mixed vector-bitmap formats PS (PostScript), EPS
(Encapsulated PostScript) and PDF, which will be converted to bitmaps.
Note that after import the image may only partly show. We&rsquo;ll see below
in <i>Properties: Image</i> how to adjust scaling and positioning of the image in the frame.
</p><p><i>Descriptions, advantages and disadvantages of various file formats will be discussed elsewhere.</i>
 
 
 
</p><h3>The Context Menu</h3>
in <i>Properties: Image</i> how to adjust scaling and positioning of the image in the frame.</p>
<p><i>Descriptions, advantages and disadvantages of various file formats will be discussed elsewhere.</i></p>
<h3>The Context Menu</h3>
<table cellpadding="3"><tbody><tr>
<td>Right-click on the empty frame to show its Context Menu as seen to the right. An empty frame will not show all these choices.
<td><p>Right-click on the empty frame to show its Context Menu as seen to the right. An empty frame will not show all these choices.</p>
<ul>
<li><b>Info</b> gives a short list of information about the image, its
name, the PPI (pixels per inch) of the original and as shown in
67,8 → 68,8
</tbody></table>
<h3>Properties: Image</h3>
<table cellpadding="3"><tbody><tr>
<td>When an Image is first loaded, the default is for it to have Free
Scaling or as is set in <i>File&nbsp;&gt; Preferences/Document Setup&nbsp;&gt; Tools&nbsp;&gt; Image</i>.
<td><p>When an Image is first loaded, the default is for it to have Free
Scaling or as is set in <i>File&nbsp;&gt; Preferences/Document Setup&nbsp;&gt; Tools&nbsp;&gt; Image</i>.</p>
<p>Under Free Scaling the spinboxes are:
</p><ul>
<li><b>X-Pos</b> and <b>Y-Pos</b> - Relative position of the left upper corner of the image to the left upper corner of the frame.</li>
86,10 → 87,12
<td><img src="images/Image_Properties.png" alt="Properties: Image"></td>
</tr>
<tr><td><img src="images/Image_warning.png"><p>If you see this warning triangle in the lower right corner of your frame, it indicates that the image resolution is below 144 DPI, or whatever you have set as your minimum value in the Preflight Verifier settings in <i>File > Preferences</i> or <i>File > Document Settings</i>. This is strictly a warning.</td></tr>
</tbody></table>
</tbody>
</table>
<h3>Edit Contents Mode</h3>
Enter Edit Contents mode by clicking the icon on the toolbar, or pressing <b>E</b> from the keyboard. Go back to Select Item mode by pressing <b>Esc</b>, or clicking outside, then inside the frame. You will need to have checked <b>Free Scaling</b> in order for this to be operational.
<p>Enter Edit Contents mode by clicking the icon on the toolbar, or pressing <b>E</b> from the keyboard. Go back to Select Item mode by pressing <b>Esc</b>, or clicking outside, then inside the frame. You will need to have checked <b>Free Scaling</b> in order for this to be operational.</p>
<p>With image frames, Edit Contents mode allows you to click-drag with
the mouse to shift the image relative to the frame, i.e., the same as
adjusting the X-Pos and Y-Pos in the Image tab.
</p></body></html>
adjusting the X-Pos and Y-Pos in the Image tab.</p>
</body>
</html>
/trunk/Scribus/doc/en/importbitmap1.html
3,6 → 3,9
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8"/>
<title>Importing Bitmap Files</title>
</head>
<style>
@import "manual.css";
</style>
<body>
<h2>Importing Bitmap Files</h2>
<h3>Supported Bitmap Formats</h3>
/trunk/Scribus/doc/en/install2.html
3,6 → 3,9
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8"/>
<title>Requirements</title>
</head>
<style>
@import "manual.css";
</style>
<body>
<h2>Requirements</h2>
<p>The programs you will need to compile Scribus 1.4 are:</p>
/trunk/Scribus/doc/en/toolbox13.html
3,6 → 3,9
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8"/>
<title>XnView</title>
</head>
<style>
@import "manual.css";
</style>
<body>
<h2>XnView</h2>
<p>There are image previewers and thumbnailing applications galore &ndash; even Konqueror and Nautilus have some of these features, so why should anyone use XnView?</p>
/trunk/Scribus/doc/en/pdf_form.html
3,6 → 3,9
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8"/>
<title>How To Create Your First PDF Web Form with Scribus</title>
</head>
<style>
@import "manual.css";
</style>
<body>
<h2>PDF Forms</h2>
<i>Thanks to Maciej Hanski, who kindly translated the original file from Polish to English. The content of this page is licenced under the Free Documentation Licence.</i></p>
/trunk/Scribus/doc/en/readme.html
3,6 → 3,9
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8"/>
<title>What&rsquo;s New in Scribus 1.4.3?</title>
</head>
<style>
@import "manual.css";
</style>
<body>
<h2>What&rsquo;s New in Scribus 1.4.3?</h2>
<p>This is a cursory overview over the changes in Scribus compared to the latest stable version of the 1.3.3.x series (1.3.3.14).</p>
/trunk/Scribus/doc/en/mailing_lists.html
3,6 → 3,9
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8"/>
<title>Mailing-Lists</title>
</head>
<style>
@import "manual.css";
</style>
<body>
<h2>Mailing List Policy and Disclaimers</h2>
<h3>Introduction</h3>
/trunk/Scribus/doc/en/doccopyright.html
3,6 → 3,9
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8"/>
<title>Copyright Notice and Publication License</title>
</head>
<style>
@import "manual.css";
</style>
<body>
<h2>Copyright Notice and Publication License</h2>
 
94,4 → 97,4
<li>UNIX and Motif are registered trademarks of The Open Group in the United States, other countries, or both.</li>
<li>All other company, product, or service names may be trademarks or service marks of others and are the property of their respective owners.</li></ul>
</body>
</html>
</html>
/trunk/Scribus/doc/en/WwText.html
3,9 → 3,12
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8"/>
<title>Working with Text</title>
</head>
<style>
@import "manual.css";
</style>
<body>
<h2>Working with Text</h2>
Unlike using a wordprocessor, Scribus uses a frames environment. Therefore, you cannot simply enter text on a document page. See <a href="WwFrames.html">Working with Frames</a> to learn about frame creation and manipulation. Once you have a text frame, your task now is to put some text into it.
<p>Unlike using a wordprocessor, Scribus uses a frames environment. Therefore, you cannot simply enter text on a document page. See <a href="WwFrames.html">Working with Frames</a> to learn about frame creation and manipulation. Once you have a text frame, your task now is to put some text into it.</p>
<p>You may place text into a text frame in the following ways:
<ul>
<li>Using Story Editor.</li>
15,17 → 18,17
<li>You can also set up custom tags in text files to act as a filter for formatting on import.</li>
</ul>
<h3>Using Story Editor</h3>
This is listed first because it is the recommended way to enter text manually from the keyboard. Bring up the Story Editor (SE) from the Context Menu or with Ctrl+T. Because SE is very versatile, it will be covered in detail in its own section. Its main disadvantage is that you will not see the final appearance of the text until you update the frame, with or without exiting SE. SE is also a convenient way to apply Paragraph and Character Styles.
<p>This is listed first because it is the recommended way to enter text manually from the keyboard. Bring up the Story Editor (SE) from the Context Menu or with Ctrl+T. Because SE is very versatile, it will be covered in detail in its own section. Its main disadvantage is that you will not see the final appearance of the text until you update the frame, with or without exiting SE. SE is also a convenient way to apply Paragraph and Character Styles.</p>
<h3>On the Main Screen</h3>
A selected frame can enter Edit Contents mode by clicking the Edit Contents icon on the toolbar or double-clicking on the frame (keyboard: E). The advantage of this is that you can see immediately the appearance of your additions or edits. It is a bit slower, since screen refreshes are involved. You can use Properties to change the font, style, and other characteristics such as linespacing. For small edits and frames which only contain a small amount of text, Edit Contents can serve your needs well.
<p>A selected frame can enter Edit Contents mode by clicking the Edit Contents icon on the toolbar or double-clicking on the frame (keyboard: E). The advantage of this is that you can see immediately the appearance of your additions or edits. It is a bit slower, since screen refreshes are involved. You can use Properties to change the font, style, and other characteristics such as linespacing. For small edits and frames which only contain a small amount of text, Edit Contents can serve your needs well.</p>
<h3>Inline Graphics</h3>
You may also insert any graphics in a line of text. Simply copy the item (Ctrl+C, for example), then paste into the line of text while in Edit Contents mode. This will not work in Story Editor.
<p>You may also insert any graphics in a line of text. Simply copy the item (Ctrl+C, for example), then paste into the line of text while in Edit Contents mode. This will not work in Story Editor.</p>
<h3>Importing Text From a File</h3>
We&rsquo;ll collapse our above list a bit, so that we consider all these unformatted, formatted, and tagged files close together.
<p>We&rsquo;ll collapse our above list a bit, so that we consider all these unformatted, formatted, and tagged files close together.</p>
<h3>Plain Text</h3>
Clicking <b>Get Text</b> will bring up a file dialog and by default look for files ending in .csv, .html, .htm, .odt, .pdb, .sxw, and .txt, so if you save a plain text file, try to save as *.txt. You can also import .doc files in Linux if you have installed antiword &ndash; on Windows versions of Scribus this is already present. If the frame has content that you want to add to, use <b>Append Text</b> instead. While appending text works in both Select Item and Edit Contents modes, they both will append text at the end.
<p>If you really do want to insert a file somewhere in the middle, append, then select the text in Edit Contents mode, cut, then paste at the point you wish it to go, while in Edit Contents mode or in Story Editor.
<p>Plain text into an empty frame will use the default font settings for your text frames, which you can change in <i>File&nbsp;&gt; Preferences&nbsp;&gt; Tools</i>.
<p>Clicking <b>Get Text</b> will bring up a file dialog and by default look for files ending in .csv, .html, .htm, .odt, .pdb, .sxw, and .txt, so if you save a plain text file, try to save as *.txt. You can also import .doc files in Linux if you have installed antiword &ndash; on Windows versions of Scribus this is already present. If the frame has content that you want to add to, use <b>Append Text</b> instead. While appending text works in both Select Item and Edit Contents modes, they both will append text at the end.</p>
<p>If you really do want to insert a file somewhere in the middle, append, then select the text in Edit Contents mode, cut, then paste at the point you wish it to go, while in Edit Contents mode or in Story Editor.</p>
<p>Plain text into an empty frame will use the default font settings for your text frames, which you can change in <i>File&nbsp;&gt; Preferences&nbsp;&gt; Tools</i>.</p>
<h3>CSV, HTML, and ODT files</h3>
<ul>
<li>CSV files (comma-separated values) are typically generated by spreadsheet or database programs, but they are simple enough that they could be created with a text editor. The data will be arranged so that a comma or some other character tells Scribus when the next field is coming, and a newline tells when the next row comes in the file. On importation, you have an opportunity to declare the separator, and also declare a <i>value separator</i>, typically quotation marks. The value separator is optional, and would be used to allow the inclusion of a comma inside the field. If you check that the first row is a header, those values will be made bold. When Scribus pulls in the data, it will use tabs between the fields. For the header row, these will be center-type and for the rest left-type.</li>
34,21 → 37,21
</ul>
<h3>Tagged Files</h3>
<table cellpadding=3><tr>
<td>The idea of putting some kind of text indicator, or tag, at intervals in a text file in order to trigger some action when the file is read is elegant and has survived since the early days of computing. The purpose in Scribus would be to automatically cause the application of some edit to the text, most commonly a paragraph style. These tags can be anything you want, but should be a combination of easy to type, easy to find visually as you scan the file, and unique. This is why the suggestions you see on the wiki and the printed manual use 2&ndash;3 letter combinations, beginning with a backslash (\).
<p>On the textfile end of things you want to put these tags, let&rsquo;s say \h1 and \h2, at the beginning of a paragraph which is to receive some style. Once you have saved the file, you then import it, initially no different than a plain text file, by using <b>Get Text</b>. You likely did not see it, but please now note the button labeled <b>Automatic</b> in the dialog. Clicking this shows a drop-down list, where you can find <b>Text Filters</b> as a choice.
<td><p>The idea of putting some kind of text indicator, or tag, at intervals in a text file in order to trigger some action when the file is read is elegant and has survived since the early days of computing. The purpose in Scribus would be to automatically cause the application of some edit to the text, most commonly a paragraph style. These tags can be anything you want, but should be a combination of easy to type, easy to find visually as you scan the file, and unique. This is why the suggestions you see on the wiki and the printed manual use 2&ndash;3 letter combinations, beginning with a backslash (\).</p>
<p>On the textfile end of things you want to put these tags, let&rsquo;s say \h1 and \h2, at the beginning of a paragraph which is to receive some style. Once you have saved the file, you then import it, initially no different than a plain text file, by using <b>Get Text</b>. You likely did not see it, but please now note the button labeled <b>Automatic</b> in the dialog. Clicking this shows a drop-down list, where you can find <b>Text Filters</b> as a choice.</p>
</td>
<td rowspan=2><img src="images/text_filter136.png" ALT="Automatic text filtering 2"></td>
</tr>
<tr><td><img src="images/text_filter135.png" ALT="Automatic text filtering" ALIGN="center">
</td></tr>
<tr><td>On choosing Text Filters, and then selecting your file and pressing Ok, you now have a bit of work to do, since unless you have already created the specific actions based on your tags, you must do so now. For each tag you have a choice of <b>Remove</b>, <b>Replace</b>, or <b>Apply</b> as the action, and of course here we want to apply a style, but as you can imagine, we might also use this to remove or replace some text on import without altering the file itself.
<p>In this small example, we have set up a filter that we have named <b>thesis</b> by choosing to <b>Apply</b> a <b>paragraph style</b>, named <b>header1</b> for <b>paragraphs starting with</b> our tag, <b>\h1</b>, and we will <b>remove match</b> (the \h1). Had we previously set up thesis, it could be chosen from the drop-down button in the upper right corner of the dialog. Similarly, if we have already created these styles, they could be chosen from a list where you see header1 and header2. We could delete an action by clicking on the <b>&ldquo;&ndash;&rdquo;</b> button, and add another with the <b>&ldquo;+&rdquo;</b> button.
<tr><td><p>On choosing Text Filters, and then selecting your file and pressing Ok, you now have a bit of work to do, since unless you have already created the specific actions based on your tags, you must do so now. For each tag you have a choice of <b>Remove</b>, <b>Replace</b>, or <b>Apply</b> as the action, and of course here we want to apply a style, but as you can imagine, we might also use this to remove or replace some text on import without altering the file itself.</p>
<p>In this small example, we have set up a filter that we have named <b>thesis</b> by choosing to <b>Apply</b> a <b>paragraph style</b>, named <b>header1</b> for <b>paragraphs starting with</b> our tag, <b>\h1</b>, and we will <b>remove match</b> (the \h1). Had we previously set up thesis, it could be chosen from the drop-down button in the upper right corner of the dialog. Similarly, if we have already created these styles, they could be chosen from a list where you see header1 and header2. We could delete an action by clicking on the <b>&ldquo;&ndash;&rdquo;</b> button, and add another with the <b>&ldquo;+&rdquo;</b> button.</p>
</td>
<td><img src="images/text_filter136b.png" ALT="Automatic text filtering 3"></td></tr>
</table>
<h3>Context Menu</h3>
<table cellpadding=3><tr>
<td>Right-click on a frame to show its Context Menu, seen to the right. We will not cover all the features of the text frame Context Menu, but here is the particular list of choices available for text frames.
<td><p>Right-click on a frame to show its Context Menu, seen to the right. We will not cover all the features of the text frame Context Menu, but here is the particular list of choices available for text frames.</p>
<ul>
<li>At the top, <b>Info</b> gives information about the content of the frame, statistics on number of paragraphs, lines, and so forth, and also whether this frame is set to print, which also applies to whether it will be included in PDF export.</li>
<li><b>Undo</b> will undo the last operation on the frame. <b>Redo</b> is available when some operation has been undone.</li>
75,21 → 78,21
</table>
<h3>Linking Text Frames</h3>
<table cellpadding=3><tr>
<td>Any multipage document is likely to need to link text from one page to the next. An automatic way of setting this up is when a new document is created. This graphic is from the lower right corner of the <b>New Document</b> dialog. We have set the <b>Options</b> for 4 pages initially, with 2-column frames (which will fill to the margins), and an 11-point gap between columns. <i>Show Document Settings After Creation</i> will bring up the <i>Document Settings</i> dialog after <b>OK</b> is clicked.
<p>You may freely edit the individual frames on pages afterward without losing your text linkage. Furthermore, if you add more pages to your document, they will also have these same linked frames. If you unlink somewhere in the middle, you will need to re-establish your linking pattern.</td>
<td><p>Any multipage document is likely to need to link text from one page to the next. An automatic way of setting this up is when a new document is created. This graphic is from the lower right corner of the <b>New Document</b> dialog. We have set the <b>Options</b> for 4 pages initially, with 2-column frames (which will fill to the margins), and an 11-point gap between columns. <i>Show Document Settings After Creation</i> will bring up the <i>Document Settings</i> dialog after <b>OK</b> is clicked.</p>
<p>You may freely edit the individual frames on pages afterward without losing your text linkage. Furthermore, if you add more pages to your document, they will also have these same linked frames. If you unlink somewhere in the middle, you will need to re-establish your linking pattern.</p></td>
<td><img src="images/text_linking.png" ALT="Options in New Document Dialog"></td>
</table>
<h3>Linking Existing Text Frames</h3>
<p><img src="images/text-frame-link.png" ALIGN-left>
A selected but unlinked text frame will show the toolbar icon to the left (green arrow) active. Click the link icon, then click the next frame that your selected frame is to link to. If you have more frames you wish to link to, continue clicking on them in order. <i>When your linking is finished, remember to click the link icon to deactivate it.</i>
A selected but unlinked text frame will show the toolbar icon to the left (green arrow) active. Click the link icon, then click the next frame that your selected frame is to link to. If you have more frames you wish to link to, continue clicking on them in order. <i>When your linking is finished, remember to click the link icon to deactivate it.</i></p>
<p><img src="images/text-frame-unlink.png" ALIGN-left>
Unlinking is a similar process. The icon will only be active if you have selected a linked frame. Select the frame where you want the linking to stop, click the unlink icon, then click the next frame in the linkage. <i>You will need to re-establish a linking pattern if you simply want to skip over a particular frame.</i>
Unlinking is a similar process. The icon will only be active if you have selected a linked frame. Select the frame where you want the linking to stop, click the unlink icon, then click the next frame in the linkage. <i>You will need to re-establish a linking pattern if you simply want to skip over a particular frame.</i></p>
<br clear=all>
<h3>Properties: Text</h3>
<table cellpadding=3><tr>
<td><img src="images/text_tab1.png" ALT="Properties: Text tab" ALIGN="right"></td>
<td><p>Due to the addition of new capabilities in Scribus 1.4.x, and redesign of the Properties palette, the Text tab has become quite complex. The basic view seems simpler, but now we have a series of sub-tabs to choose from. At the top of the tab, there is a button for the font family, and then just below it the fontface in that family. Next we come to the spinbox for text size, and just below that a drop-down selector for linespacing, with 3 choices: <b>Fixed</b>, <b>Automatic</b>, and <b>Align to Baseline Grid</b>. Fixed linespacing allows you to set the space between lines of text using the spinbox to the right. Automatic spacing causes Scribus to adjust for you, according to the font size. The default setting for this is 120% of the font size, but this can be adjusted in <i>File&nbsp;&gt; Preferences&nbsp;&gt; Typography</i>. Finally, the row of buttons at the bottom sets justification &ndash; left, center, right, full, and forced full.
<p>At this point it should be mentioned that when you are in Select Item mode, any changes will apply to the entire frame contents. In Edit Contents mode, things are a bit more complex.
<td><p>Due to the addition of new capabilities in Scribus 1.4.x, and redesign of the Properties palette, the Text tab has become quite complex. The basic view seems simpler, but now we have a series of sub-tabs to choose from. At the top of the tab, there is a button for the font family, and then just below it the fontface in that family. Next we come to the spinbox for text size, and just below that a drop-down selector for linespacing, with 3 choices: <b>Fixed</b>, <b>Automatic</b>, and <b>Align to Baseline Grid</b>. Fixed linespacing allows you to set the space between lines of text using the spinbox to the right. Automatic spacing causes Scribus to adjust for you, according to the font size. The default setting for this is 120% of the font size, but this can be adjusted in <i>File&nbsp;&gt; Preferences&nbsp;&gt; Typography</i>. Finally, the row of buttons at the bottom sets justification &ndash; left, center, right, full, and forced full.</p>
<p>At this point it should be mentioned that when you are in Select Item mode, any changes will apply to the entire frame contents. In Edit Contents mode, things are a bit more complex.</p>
<ul>
<li>If your cursor is at some particular position, changes in font, fontface, and size apply to the single glyph to the right of the cursor.</li>
<li>If your cursor is highlighting a block of text, changes in font, fontface, and size apply to the highlighted glyphs.</li>
99,15 → 102,15
</table>
<h3><a name="10">What About the Baseline Grid?</a></h3>
<table cellpadding=3 width="80%"><tr>
<td>The baseline grid is always present but hidden by default, and is never seen in printed output or in your PDF. Click <i>View&nbsp;&gt; Show Baseline Grid</i> to see it. Its default setting is 14.40 points, and the default is adjustable in <i>File&nbsp;&gt; Preferences&nbsp;&gt; Guides</i>, where you will see that the <b>Offset</b> is also adjustable &ndash; this is the displacement of glyphs from the baseline, and can have a positive or negative value.
<p>To the right we see text aligned to the baseline grid for the entire frame, along with an illustration of localized adjustments in Edit Contents mode. The Offset here is 0. As you can see, this is also a method for keeping linespacing constant when font size varies in a paragraph, since aligning to the baseline grid is just another kind of fixed linespacing. The other common use for aligning to baseline grid is to make sure that lines of text match their spacing in adjacent frames or columns.</td>
<td><p>The baseline grid is always present but hidden by default, and is never seen in printed output or in your PDF. Click <i>View&nbsp;&gt; Show Baseline Grid</i> to see it. Its default setting is 14.40 points, and the default is adjustable in <i>File&nbsp;&gt; Preferences&nbsp;&gt; Guides</i>, where you will see that the <b>Offset</b> is also adjustable &ndash; this is the displacement of glyphs from the baseline, and can have a positive or negative value.</p>
<p>To the right we see text aligned to the baseline grid for the entire frame, along with an illustration of localized adjustments in Edit Contents mode. The Offset here is 0. As you can see, this is also a method for keeping linespacing constant when font size varies in a paragraph, since aligning to the baseline grid is just another kind of fixed linespacing. The other common use for aligning to baseline grid is to make sure that lines of text match their spacing in adjacent frames or columns.</p></td>
<td><img src="images/text_tab2.png" ALT="Baseline Grid" ALIGN="right"></td></tr>
</table>
 
<h3>Color & Effects</h3>
<table cellpadding=3><tr>
<td>Here we choose the colors for text. The fill color for a font is the main color. The line color only is active when outline or shadow effects are activated, and there is only one color applied to both effects.
<p>From left to right, the effects buttons are as follows:
<td><p>Here we choose the colors for text. The fill color for a font is the main color. The line color only is active when outline or shadow effects are activated, and there is only one color applied to both effects.</p>
<p>From left to right, the effects buttons are as follows:</p>
<ol>
<li>Underline sections of text, including intervening spaces. Hold down the button to make adjustments of <b>Displacement</b> and <b>Linewidth</b>. Defaults are in <i>File&nbsp;&gt; Preferences&nbsp;&gt; Typography</i>.</li>
<li>Underline words only, not intervening spaces. Hold down the button to make adjustments of <b>Displacement</b> and <b>Linewidth</b>. Defaults are in <i>File&nbsp;&gt; Preferences&nbsp;&gt; Typography</i>.</li>
126,14 → 129,15
</table>
<table cellpadding=3><tr>
<td align=center><img src="images/text_tab4.png" ALT="Reverse a word workaround" ALIGN="left"></td>
<td>To the left is a workaround for the apparent inability to reverse only an individual word using inline graphics. A small text frame was made with our word to be reversed, then converted to outlines. The group of outlines was then flipped, copied, then inserted inline (as in inline graphics) into our sample text.</td>
<td><p>To the left is a workaround for the apparent inability to reverse only an individual word using inline graphics. A small text frame was made with our word to be reversed, then converted to outlines. The group of outlines was then flipped, copied, then inserted inline (as in inline graphics) into our sample text.</p>
</td>
</tr>
</table>
<h3>Style Settings</h3>
Here in the Properties palette, we can only set an already created style. An explanation on creating and editing styles is found in <a href="WwStyles.html">Working with Styles</a>.
<p>Here in the Properties palette, we can only set an already created style. An explanation on creating and editing styles is found in <a href="WwStyles.html">Working with Styles</a>.</p>
<h3>First Line Offset</h3>
<table cellpadding=3>
<tr><td>First line offset refers to how closely the first line of text approaches the top of the frame or the space it is allowed. In this example, where we have set a top distance, we see from left to right, <b>Maximum Ascent</b>, <b>Font Ascent</b>, and <b>Line Spacing</b> offsets.
<tr><td><p>First line offset refers to how closely the first line of text approaches the top of the frame or the space it is allowed. In this example, where we have set a top distance, we see from left to right, <b>Maximum Ascent</b>, <b>Font Ascent</b>, and <b>Line Spacing</b> offsets.</p>
</td></tr>
<tr>
<td><img src="images/text_tab7a.png" ALT="First Line Offset"></td></tr>
141,13 → 145,13
<h3>Columns and Text Distances</h3>
<table cellpadding=3 width="60%"><tr>
<td><img src="images/text_tab6.png" width=200 height=200 ALT="Columns and Text Distances" ALIGN="left"></td>
<td>Formerly, this was in the Shape tab, but now has sensibly moved to Text, since it does apply to text frames. Another enhancement is that now we can see in this example that two <b>Columns</b>, a <b>Gap</b>, and <b>Top</b> and <b>Left</b> distances have been set, even in an empty frame. This feature can be turned off/on with <i>View&nbsp;&gt; Show Text Frame Columns</i>.</td></tr>
<td><p>Formerly, this was in the Shape tab, but now has sensibly moved to Text, since it does apply to text frames. Another enhancement is that now we can see in this example that two <b>Columns</b>, a <b>Gap</b>, and <b>Top</b> and <b>Left</b> distances have been set, even in an empty frame. This feature can be turned off/on with <i>View&nbsp;&gt; Show Text Frame Columns</i>.</p></td></tr>
</table>
<h3>Tabulators</h3>
<table cellpadding=3><tr>
<td>Tabulators will also be covered in Working with Styles, but here we can create and apply frame-wide tab stops. Operationally this is quite easy. Simply click somewhere along the ruler, and a <b>Left</b> tab is created. Adjust <b>Position</b> manually or with the spinbox. If desired you can change the tab type to <b>Right</b>, <b>Period</b>, <b>Comma</b>, or <b>Center</b>. To delete an individual tab, click-drag it off the ruler.
<p>The space between stops (<b>Fill Char</b>) will by default be white space (<b>None</b>), or can be <b>Dot</b>, <b>Hyphen</b>, <b>Underscore</b> or a <b>Custom</b> character of your choice.
<p>Tab Types
<td><p>Tabulators will also be covered in Working with Styles, but here we can create and apply frame-wide tab stops. Operationally this is quite easy. Simply click somewhere along the ruler, and a <b>Left</b> tab is created. Adjust <b>Position</b> manually or with the spinbox. If desired you can change the tab type to <b>Right</b>, <b>Period</b>, <b>Comma</b>, or <b>Center</b>. To delete an individual tab, click-drag it off the ruler. </p>
<p>The space between stops (<b>Fill Char</b>) will by default be white space (<b>None</b>), or can be <b>Dot</b>, <b>Hyphen</b>, <b>Underscore</b> or a <b>Custom</b> character of your choice.</p>
<p>Tab Types</p>
<ul>
<li>Left &ndash; entered text goes to the right of the stop.</li>
<li>Right &ndash; entered text goes to the left until Tab is pressed again.</li>
160,7 → 164,7
</table>
<h3>Optical Margins</h3>
<table cellpadding=3 width="75%"><tr>
<td>When there is punctuation ending or beginning a line, the adjacent characters will be pushed in a bit resulting in a slightly ragged edge to the text. Application of optical margins allows the punctuation to extend from the frame just a bit so that the edges of other characters line up more closely.
<td><p>When there is punctuation ending or beginning a line, the adjacent characters will be pushed in a bit resulting in a slightly ragged edge to the text. Application of optical margins allows the punctuation to extend from the frame just a bit so that the edges of other characters line up more closely.</p>
<p>In the image to the right, on the left side we see the edge with no optical margins applied, and the right side shows what we see with optical margins.</td>
<td><img src="images/text_tab11b.png" ALT="Optical Margins" ALIGN="right"></td></tr>
</table>
167,8 → 171,8
<h3>Advanced Settings</h3>
<table cellpadding=3 width="80%">
<tr><td>The upper part of this sub-tab contains some features long present in Scribus, but have simply moved here. Starting from the upper left spinbox and going clockwise, we have an adjustment to baseline, and not just for align to baseline grid, so that selected words can be shifted above or below the baseline for the desired effect.
<p>Next we have kerning, in which the spaces between glyphs can be adjusted, again in a smaller than normal (negative percent) or larger fashion.
<p>In the lower right corner we can stretch or shrink glyphs vertically, and in the lower left shrink or stretch horizontally.</td>
<p>Next we have kerning, in which the spaces between glyphs can be adjusted, again in a smaller than normal (negative percent) or larger fashion.</p>
<p>In the lower right corner we can stretch or shrink glyphs vertically, and in the lower left shrink or stretch horizontally.</p></td>
<td><img src="images/text_tab13.png" ALT="Advanced Settings" ALIGN="right"></td>
</tr>
</table>
/trunk/Scribus/doc/en/contributions.html
3,6 → 3,9
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8"/>
<title>Contributions to the Documentation<</title>
</head>
<style>
@import "manual.css";
</style>
<body>
<h2>Contributions to the Documentation</h2>
 
/trunk/Scribus/doc/en/importhints3.html
3,6 → 3,9
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8"/>
<title>Scribus and OpenOffice.org/OpenDocument</title>
</head>
<style>
@import "manual.css";
</style>
<body>
<h2>Scribus and OpenOffice.org/OpenDocument</h2>
 
93,4 → 96,4
</ul>
</p>
</body>
</html>
</html>
/trunk/Scribus/doc/en/createlinks.html
5,9 → 5,12
<title>Creating Document Links</title>
 
</head><body>
<h2>Creating Document Links</h2>
<h3>and Annotations</h3>
</head>
<style>
@import "manual.css";
</style>
<body>
<h2>Creating Document Links and Annotations</h2>
<p>The first thing to clarify is what this article is about. We are referring to a situation where you want to create a clickable link in your PDF, which might link to some other place in your current document, some other PDF document, or even a weblink. We will not cover <strong>linking text frames</strong>, which is covered in <strong>Working with Text Frames</strong>.
</p>
<p>The most straightforward way to create a linking area (and this is literally what we are doing), is to click the <i>Insert Link Annotation</i> icon on the toolbar (presuming you have the <strong>PDF Tools</strong> collection of items activated &ndash; right-click on the toolbar to see which are currently showing). This icon looks like two shoeprints.
/trunk/Scribus/doc/en/color7.html
3,6 → 3,9
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8"/>
<title>Color Palettes in Scribus (5): GiveLife Color System&reg;</title>
</head>
<style>
@import "manual.css";
</style>
<body>
<h2>Color Palettes in Scribus (5): GiveLife Color System&reg;</h2>
 
23,4 → 26,4
<p>The Scribus Team will cooperate with GiveLife Color System&reg; to ensure that updates to the existing palettes, as well as new color systems will be made available to our users in the future.</p>
<br>
</body>
</html>
</html>
/trunk/Scribus/doc/en/cms3.html
3,6 → 3,9
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8"/>
<title>Rendering Intents</title>
</head>
<style>
@import "manual.css";
</style>
<body>
<h2>Rendering Intents</h2>
 
17,4 → 20,4
<li><b>Relative Colorimetric:</b> When a color is not printable within the gamut of the output device, this rendering intent prints the closest match along with an adjustment that maps white to the paper of the output. This mapping of &ldquo;white point&rdquo; prevents the problems of &ldquo;Absolute Colorimetric&rdquo; with images that will not be printed with spot colors.</li>
</ul>
</body>
</html>
</html>
/trunk/Scribus/doc/en/scribus-svg.html
3,6 → 3,9
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8"/>
<title>Importing SVG</title>
</head>
<style>
@import "manual.css";
</style>
<body>
<h2>Importing SVG</h2>
<h3>What is SVG?</h3>
28,4 → 31,4
<li><b>Color management</b>: The SVG specification supports the use of ICC color profiles, but just like fonts, profiles can&rsquo;t be embedded. The Scribus SVG import filter will ignore referenced color profiles and assume that RGB colors use the sRGB color space instead.</li>
</ul>
</body>
</html>
</html>
/trunk/Scribus/doc/en/color7c.html
3,6 → 3,9
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8"/>
<title>Color Palettes in Scribus (6b): Galaxy Color Emotions</title>
</head>
<style>
@import "manual.css";
</style>
<body>
<h2>Color Palettes in Scribus (6b): Galaxy Emotional Color Tool&trade;</h2>
<p>The Galaxy Emotional Color Tool&trade; corresponds to the printed <i>Galaxy Color Mix and Emotions</i> tool on the <a href="http://www.galaxygauge.com/p_col_cmp.html">Galaxy Color Map Pro</a> and <a href="http://www.galaxygauge.com/p_col_clz.html">Galaxy Color Zil</a> tools. The color combinations are based on research with regard to physiological reactions like pupil dilation or galvanomic skin resistance to color choices.</p>
179,4 → 182,4
<br>
<br>
</body>
</html>
</html>
/trunk/Scribus/doc/en/toolbox6.html
5,7 → 5,11
<title>GSview</title>
 
</head><body>
</head>
<style>
@import "manual.css";
</style>
<body>
<h2>GSview*</h2>
 
<p>One important thing to note is that <a href="http://pages.cs.wisc.edu/%7Eghost/gsview/index.htm">GSview</a> <b>must not be confused</b> with <strong style="font-weight: normal;">ghostview, gv and their derivatives!</strong> Although Adobe Reader is often a better pure viewer for PDFs, GSview should be regarded as one of the most essential tools to have when using Scribus. GSview has some extremely useful functions. For those unfamiliar with the program, it provides an easy-to-use &ldquo;front end&rdquo; to <a href="toolbox5.html">Ghostscript</a>, as well as <code>pstoedit</code> for converting bitmaps into vector files or vice versa. For those coming from a traditional DTP background in the Mac/Windows world, it also provides some of the functionality of Adobe Acrobat.<br>
51,4 → 55,4
 
<p>*) <span style="font-style: italic;">Parts of this section are thanks to Russell Lang, author and maintainer of GSview, epstool and Ghostscript for his hints and patiently answering questions about GSview and Ghostscript.</span></p>
 
</body></html>
</body></html>
/trunk/Scribus/doc/en/pdfexport_image.html
3,6 → 3,9
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8"/>
<title>PDF Export: Image Compression</title>
</head>
<style>
@import "manual.css";
</style>
<body>
<h3>Image Compression with PDF Export</h3>
 
/trunk/Scribus/doc/en/color_editing.html
3,6 → 3,9
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8"/>
<title>Editing Colors</title>
</head>
<style>
@import "manual.css";
</style>
<body>
<h3>Editing Colors</h3>
<p>This is a brief introduction and orientation to the <i>Colors</i> dialog, which you activate by selecting <i>Edit > Colors</i> from the menu. Note that this has two modes. The one you may already be familiar with is its use when you already have a document open, and this will be discussed in this section. When you create and save a new document, all the colors that are availabe in the dialog <i>Edit > Colors</i> will be stored in that document. This is an important detail, because any changes to a color palette will only affect the current document.</p>
/trunk/Scribus/doc/en/pdfx3.html
3,6 → 3,9
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8"/>
<title>PDF/X-3</title>
</head>
<style>
@import "manual.css";
</style>
<body>
<h2>PDF/X-3</h2>
<p>Support for PDF/X-3 was a major milestone in the development of Scribus. It was the first page layout application to support this demanding, but open ISO standard (ISO 15930-3:2002).</p>
/trunk/Scribus/doc/en/pagenumber.html
3,6 → 3,9
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8"/>
<title>Automatic Page Numbers</title>
</head>
<style>
@import "manual.css";
</style>
<body>
<h2>Automatic page numbering</h2>
 
/trunk/Scribus/doc/en/psd.html
3,6 → 3,9
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8"/>
<title>Working with Photoshop&#174; Files</title>
</head>
<style>
@import "manual.css";
</style>
<body>
<h2>Working with Photoshop&#174; Files</h2>
 
57,4 → 60,4
</ul>
<br>
</body>
</html>
</html>
/trunk/Scribus/doc/en/help.html
3,6 → 3,9
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8"/>
<title>Help!!</title>
</head>
<style>
@import "manual.css";
</style>
<body>
<h2>Help!!</h2>
 
/trunk/Scribus/doc/en/WwFrames.html
2,7 → 2,11
<html><head>
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8">
<title>Working with Frames</title>
</head><body>
</head>
<style>
@import "manual.css";
</style>
<body>
<h2>Working with Frames</h2>
 
<p>Working with Scribus is for the most part working with a frames
23,8 → 27,7
Each of these have their own section in this online manual, but here we
will explain features they share.
<h3>Creating Frames</h3>
 
There are at least six ways to create frames:
<p>There are at least six ways to create frames:</p>
<ol>
 
<li>Clicking the toolbar icon for the type of frame</li>
48,10 → 51,10
 
<tbody>
<tr>
<td valign="top">If you change your mind or pressed the wrong key
<td valign="top"><p>If you change your mind or pressed the wrong key
(at least in the cases 1, 2 and 3),
you can press Esc or the Spacebar to cancel, or click the toolbar icon
for your next choice.
for your next choice.</p>
<p>When you make one of the choices 1&ndash;3, your mouse cursor
becomes activated to draw the frame, and a tooltip pops up to tell you
the cursor&rsquo;s X-Pos and Y-Pos. As you click-drag to make the frame from
82,11 → 85,10
 
 
<h3>Context Menus</h3>
 
Each frame type has its own particular Context Menu, found by
<p>Each frame type has its own particular Context Menu, found by
right-clicking on it. Since these are variable depending on the type of
frame, they will not be elaborated upon here. Keep in mind that you can
find interesting things in Scribus by right-clicking on various items.
find interesting things in Scribus by right-clicking on various items.</p>
<h3>Manipulating Frames</h3>
 
<h4>How to Use Spinboxes</h4>
130,7 → 132,7
tab (<b>X-Pos</b> and <b>Y-Pos</b>) and its
spinboxes. </p>
<h4>Resizing Frames</h4>
A selected frame shows a dotted red border and in addition small square
<p>A selected frame shows a dotted red border and in addition small square
handles at the corners and at the midpoints of each side. Click and
drag a handle to make manual adjustments. If you hold down the Alt key <i>and
the cursor is not over a spinbox</i>, you can resize the frame using
137,7 → 139,7
the arrow keys. To resize a frame proportionally, press Ctrl+Alt while
moving a handle. Use the <b>Width</b> and <b>Height</b> spinboxes in
the Properties Palette for
precision. </td>
precision.</p> </td>
<td valign="middle"><img src="images/XYZ_Prop.png"></td>
</tr>
</tbody>
144,8 → 146,7
</table>
 
<h4>Rotating Frames</h4>
 
There are 2 ways to rotate a frame:
<p>There are 2 ways to rotate a frame:</p>
<ul>
 
<li>Click the Rotate icon on the toolbar. You then click-drag inside
164,10 → 165,10
<tr>
<td>
<h4>Moving Frames &ndash; Level to Level or Layer to Layer</h4>
You can move up or down levels using Properties&nbsp;&gt; X,Y,Z tab, in the
<p>You can move up or down levels using Properties&nbsp;&gt; X,Y,Z tab, in the
area labelled <b>Level</b>, either one level at a time or to the top
or bottom. The number beside these arrows tells you which level your
object is on (1 is the bottom).
object is on (1 is the bottom).</p>
<p>There are also keyboard shortcuts: </p>
<ul>
<li>Home: to the top</li>
175,10 → 176,10
<li>Ctrl+Home: up one level</li>
<li>Ctrl+End: down one level</li>
</ul>
If you have more than one <a href="layers.html">layer</a>, you can use the Context Menu
(right-click on the frame) to send the frame to a different layer.
<p>If you have more than one <a href="layers.html">layer</a>, you can use the Context Menu
(right-click on the frame) to send the frame to a different layer.</p>
<h4>Final Section of Properties: X,Y,Z</h4>
Looking at the last group of seven buttons in the lower right corner of <b>X,Y,Z</b>,
<p>Looking at the last group of seven buttons in the lower right corner of <b>X,Y,Z</b>,
the two leftmost buttons, grayed out in this picture, will group and
ungroup a collection of selected objects (note that vector drawings are <span style="font-style: italic;">always</span> imported as groups of objects). The next two buttons, with
the blue arrows, flip the object horizontally or vertically. The
185,7 → 186,7
picture of the lock is where you can lock or unlock the selected
object, and just to its right you can lock or unlock only the size of
the object. The last button in the lower right corner enables is
disables printing (and export to PDF) of the object. </td>
disables printing (and export to PDF) of the object.</p> </td>
<td valign="middle"><img src="images/XYZ_Prop1.png"></td>
</tr>
</tbody>
192,8 → 193,7
</table>
 
<h4>Copy, Cut, Paste, Delete</h4>
 
Most users should be familiar with these kinds of operations common to
<p>Most users should be familiar with these kinds of operations common to
many types of editing software. They can be found in the Context Menu or the <span style="font-style: italic;">Edit</span> menu,
and have the standard keyboard shortcuts of Ctrl+C, Ctrl+X, Ctrl+V, and
Del. In Scribus, Delete operates similar to Cut, since it can be undone, but
200,11 → 200,10
in contrast is not copied to the clipboard and therefore cannot be
pasted. If you move from one page or one layer to another, Paste will
place the new copy at the same coordinates it had on the original page
or layer.
or layer.</p>
<h4>Selecting Multiple Frames</h4>
 
You might do this as a prelude to grouping the frames, so you can move
or scale them as a unit.
<p>You might do this as a prelude to grouping the frames, so you can move
or scale them as a unit.</p>
<p>The simplest way of selecting a group of frames is to click-drag <i>around</i>
them. You have to be sure that any frame you wish to be selected is
<span style="font-style: italic;">fully</span> within the temporary rectangle you see during this operation.
220,12 → 219,11
</p>
 
<h4>Selecting Frames Under Other Frames</h4>
 
If all you want to do is select an individual frame that happens to be
<p>If all you want to do is select an individual frame that happens to be
completely underneath some other frame, hold Shift+Ctrl, and click
serially on a particular spot to toggle through the frames covering
that spot. You will cycle through the frames, but also at some point
select none of them.
select none of them.</p>
<p><i>Note: if you find an inability to select a frame underneath
another using this method, consider that this frame may be on another
layer. You may only work on one layer at a time.</i>
232,8 → 230,7
</p>
 
<h3>Line and Colors of Frames</h3>
 
The line of a frame is the border. For text, image and render frames, the
<p>The line of a frame is the border. For text, image and render frames, the
default color of the line is None, so none of the line settings have
any meaning until the line is given a color in the <span style="font-style: italic;">Colors</span> tab of the Properties Palette. The
default background or fill color of text and image frames is also None.
241,7 → 238,7
<br>
For Shapes and Polygons, the default fill color is set to None, whereas the default line color is Black. For all
kinds of frames these default colors can be set in <span style="font-style: italic;">File &gt; Document Setup &gt; Tools</span> for the current document and in <span style="font-style: italic;">File &gt;
Preferences &gt; Tools</span> for new documents.
Preferences &gt; Tools</span> for new documents.</p>
<h3>Text Flow Around Frame</h3>
 
<table cellpadding="5">
248,9 → 245,9
 
<tbody>
<tr>
<td>The first important thing to remember is that this can be a
<td><p>The first important thing to remember is that this can be a
property of any kind of frame, and that it applies to any text frames <i>underneath</i>
it, underneath being not only on a lower level, but also a lower layer.
it, underneath being not only on a lower level, but also a lower layer.</p>
<p>Secondly, you need to choose whether you want flow around the
frame, the contour line, or the bounding box – making your choice in
the <span style="font-style: italic;">Shape</span> tab of Properties. For text and image frames, all 3 coincide
/trunk/Scribus/doc/en/pdfexport3.html
3,6 → 3,10
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8"/>
<title>PDF Export for Screen/Web</title>
</head>
<style>
@import "manual.css";
</style>
<body>
<h2>PDF Export for Screen/Web</h2>
 
<b>Recommended settings and hints:</b>
/trunk/Scribus/doc/en/toolbox18.html
3,6 → 3,9
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8"/>
<title>LibreOffice/OpenOffice.org</title>
</head>
<style>
@import "manual.css";
</style>
<body>
<h2>LibreOffice/OpenOffice.org</h2>
 
23,4 → 26,4
 
 
</body>
</html>
</html>
/trunk/Scribus/doc/en/manual.css
0,0 → 1,8
h1 {font-family:fontin,sans-serif; font-size:1.3em;}
h2 {font-family:fontin,sans-serif; font-size:1.2em;}
h3 {font-family:fontin,sans-serif; font-size:1.1em;}
h4 {font-family:fontin,sans-serif; font-size:1em;}
 
p, blockquote {font-family:dejavu sans,sans-serif; font-size:0.8em;}
li {font-family:dejavu sans,sans-serif; font-size:0.8em;}
code {font-size:1.2em;}
/trunk/Scribus/doc/en/color4.html
3,6 → 3,9
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8"/>
<title>Color Palettes in Scribus (2): National/Government Standards</title>
</head>
<style>
@import "manual.css";
</style>
<body>
<h2>Color Palettes in Scribus (2): National/Government Standards</h2>
<p>In some countries the national standard bodies or governments themselves created standardized color sets, i.e., color standards that bidders/tenderers in calls for tenders must comply with. While some of these standards have niche applications, like military vessels or cables, others are considered to be &ldquo;general purpose&rdquo; color standards. The Scribus Team has collected and will continue to collect as many of those standards as possible, at least if they aren&rsquo;t defined as a subset of other color &ldquo;standards&rdquo; like Pantone&reg;. We hope that this feature will facilitate the use of Scribus in government agencies.</p>
117,4 → 120,4
</table>
 
</body>
</html>
</html>
/trunk/Scribus/doc/en/releases.html
3,6 → 3,9
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8"/>
<title>Release History</title>
</head>
<style>
@import "manual.css";
</style>
<body>
<h2>Release History</h2>
<ul>
/trunk/Scribus/doc/en/add_colors.html
3,9 → 3,12
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8"/>
<title>Adding and Editing Colors</title>
</head>
<style>
@import "manual.css";
</style>
<body>
<h2>Adding and Editing Colors</h2>
If you are looking for instructions on how to change an entire color palette, <a href="color2.html">then go here</a>.
<p>If you are looking for instructions on how to change an entire color palette, <a href="color2.html">then go here</a>.</p>
<h3>Manual Methods</h3>
<h4>Making a New Color</h4>
<p>Here is the new dialog we now get with <i>Edit > Colors</i>, now renamed <i>Manage Paints</i> for 1.5+ versions of Scribus. You may notice that the default palette is now <i>Scribus Small</i>, similar to <i>Scribus Basic</i>, but with fewer blacks, and no RGB colors. A more obvious change is that now we can edit Patterns and Gradients here, though this screenshot shows neither are present in the default state.</p>
19,7 → 22,7
<td><img src="images/add_colors6.png"></td>
</tr>
</table>
Once you click tne <strong>Add</strong> button, and you then see the familiar <i>Edit Color</i> dialog. Give your color a unique name, then use the sliders to adjust the hue and saturation. You can also click somewhere in the rainbow area for a quick approximation of what you're looking to achieve. Click <strong>OK</strong> to add this new color to your palette. Keep in mind that using this method, your palette will only apply to this document &ndash; having said this, below we'll see how to import a palette from a saved file.</p>
<p>Once you click the <strong>Add</strong> button, and you then see the familiar <i>Edit Color</i> dialog. Give your color a unique name, then use the sliders to adjust the hue and saturation. You can also click somewhere in the rainbow area for a quick approximation of what you're looking to achieve. Click <strong>OK</strong> to add this new color to your palette. Keep in mind that using this method, your palette will only apply to this document &ndash; having said this, below we'll see how to import a palette from a saved file.</p>
<p>You have 3 <i>Color Models</i> to choose from: <strong>RGB</strong>, <strong>CMYK</strong>, and <strong>Web Safe RGB</strong>. This last choice limits the values to those which will display the same on 8-bit and 16-bit color systems.</p>
<h4>Borrowing a Color from another Palette</h4>
<table width="90%" cellpadding="5">
39,7 → 42,7
<h4>From another document</h4>
<p>If you begin with a previously saved document, you will use its color set. If you extrapolate from this fact, then you might choose to open a document, delete its content, and <i>File > Save As</i> under a new name.</p>
<p>You might even anticipate this, especially if you have a customized color palette, by saving an empty document named something like "colorscheme3.sla" or some other meaningful guide to finding it later.</p>
You could also consider that when you import a page from another document, its colors will be imported. Lastly, even if you have already begun a new document, you can open <i>Edit > Colors</i>, and choose <strong>Import</strong> from the dialog to import the colors from another document.</p>
<p>You could also consider that when you import a page from another document, its colors will be imported. Lastly, even if you have already begun a new document, you can open <i>Edit > Colors</i>, and choose <strong>Import</strong> from the dialog to import the colors from another document.</p>
<h4>From Imported Objects</h4>
<p>Whenever you import an object from the Scrapbook, its colors will be added to the document. Similarly, vector graphics (SVG, EPS, and so on) will also add any colors they may contain.</p>
 
/trunk/Scribus/doc/en/toolbox3.html
3,6 → 3,9
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8"/>
<title>Batik</title>
</head>
<style>
@import "manual.css";
</style>
<body>
<h2>Batik</h2>
 
/trunk/Scribus/doc/en/fonts1.html
1,6 → 1,9
<head>
<title>Scribus Font Tools (1)</title>
</head>
<style>
@import "manual.css";
</style>
<body>
<h2>Scribus Font Tools (1)</h2>
 
53,4 → 56,4
<table width="100%"><tr><td align="center"><img src="images/fontpref1.png" alt="Adding additional font paths." title="Adding additional font paths."/></td></tr></table>
 
</body>
</html>
</html>
/trunk/Scribus/doc/en/print2.html
3,6 → 3,9
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8"/>
<title>Printing Tools (1)</title>
</head>
<style>
@import "manual.css";
</style>
<body>
<h2>Printing Tools (1)</h2>
<h3>The Preflight Verifier</h3>
/trunk/Scribus/doc/en/toolbox.html
5,7 → 5,11
<title>Your DTP Tool Box</title>
 
</head><body>
</head>
<style>
@import "manual.css";
</style>
<body>
<h2>Your DTP Tool Box</h2>
 
<p>As you have <a href="about2.html">learned</a>, DTP is mostly about assembling content created in other programs. This is a selection of reliable tools, recommended by the developers for use with Scribus.</p>
12,4 → 16,4
 
 
 
</body></html>
</body></html>
/trunk/Scribus/doc/en/tutorials.html
3,6 → 3,9
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8"/>
<title>Tutorials</title>
</head>
<style>
@import "manual.css";
</style>
<body>
<h2>Tutorials</h2>
 
/trunk/Scribus/doc/en/install4.html
5,6 → 5,9
<title>Compiling and Installing Using CMake and Scribus 1.4.x</title>
</head>
 
<style>
@import "manual.css";
</style>
<body>
<h2>Compiling and Installing Using CMake and Scribus 1.4.x</h2>
 
/trunk/Scribus/doc/en/readme-haiku.html
3,6 → 3,9
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8"/>
<title>Scribus on Haiku</title>
</head>
<style>
@import "manual.css";
</style>
<body>
<h2>Scribus on Haiku</h2>
 
27,4 → 30,4
<br>
<br>
</body>
</html>
</html>
/trunk/Scribus/doc/en/toolbox15.html
3,6 → 3,9
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8"/>
<title>Krita</title>
</head>
<style>
@import "manual.css";
</style>
<body>
<h2>Krita</h2>
<p>After rising from the ashes, <a href="http://krita.org">Krita</a>, a part of the <a href="http://www.calligra-suite.org/">Calligra</a> suite, has become an almost unique application focused on natural painting, like CorelPainter. Using a brushes metaphor on screen, it has some innovative and quite interesting features like the ability to emulate the way painting colors mix and dry on canvas, a filters gallery to display previews of each filter, adjustment layers, layer groups and tools to precisely manipulate brush strokes.</p>
/trunk/Scribus/doc/en/readme-win32.html
3,6 → 3,9
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8"/>
<title>Scribus on Windows</title>
</head>
<style>
@import "manual.css";
</style>
<body>
<h3>Scribus on Windows</h3>
 
/trunk/Scribus/doc/en/color1.html
3,9 → 3,12
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8"/>
<title>Color Palettes</title>
</head>
<style>
@import "manual.css";
</style>
<body>
<h3>Color Palettes</h3>
<h5>Please note that this chapter is not about color management, but about the editing and managing of color <a href="WwFill.html">fills</a>. Color management is described in a <a href="cms.html">separate chapter</a>.</b></i></h5>
<p><strong><em>Please note that this chapter is not about color management, but about the editing and managing of color <a href="WwFill.html">fills</a>. Color management is described in a <a href="cms.html">separate chapter</a>.</em></strong>
<p>Within Scribus there are several methods to create, import and edit solid colors and color sets. Moreover, Scribus has a well developed tool, the <a href="colorwheel.html">Color Wheel plug-in</a>, which helps with creating color harmonies and even testing them for people with color blindness.</p>
<h3>Why Color Sets?</h3>
<p>The answer to the question in the headline is closely related to the answer to a more basic question, namely: &ldquo;What is a color?&rdquo; The truth is, there is no simple answer to that question, as a &ldquo;color&rdquo; can be described in hundreds of ways, for example as a combination of wavelengths, a combination of color values within a certain &ldquo;color model&rdquo;, as a category in a framework based on aesthetical rules etc. As a result, many different so-called &ldquo;color models&rdquo; have been developed over the course of time, many of which have become part of a discipline called &ldquo;color science,&rdquo; a science that is itself a &ldquo;meta-science,&rdquo; as it requires input from many different disciplines, including physics, neuro-science, biology, mathematics, engineering, and even art, artisanry or literature. &ldquo;Color&rdquo; is actually one of a few cases, in which artists like Johann Wolfgang von Goethe or Albert Henry Munsell contributed significantly to scientific progress.</p>
28,28 → 31,28
<tr valign=top>
<td><img src="images/rgb.png"></td>
<td> </td>
<td><b>RGB Colors</b>: These colours are defined in the RGB color model. Every color is described by the three primary colors red, green and blue.</td>
<td><p><b>RGB Colors</b>: These colours are defined in the RGB color model. Every color is described by the three primary colors red, green and blue.</p></td>
</tr>
<tr valign=top>
<td><img src="images/cmyk.png" align="top"></td>
<td></td>
<td><b>CMYK Colors</b>: These colors are defined in the CMYK color model. Every color is described by the four ink colors used in color printing: Cyan, Magenta, Yellow and Key (=Black).</td>
<td><p><b>CMYK Colors</b>: These colors are defined in the CMYK color model. Every color is described by the four ink colors used in color printing: Cyan, Magenta, Yellow and Key (=Black).</p></td>
</tr>
<tr valign=top>
<td><img src="images/spot.png"></td>
<td></td>
<td><b>Spot Colors</b>: These are also referred to as &ldquo;named colors,&rdquo; but since other (RGB/CMYK) colors can also have a name, the term &ldquo;spot color&rdquo; is to be preferred for unambiguousness. While a spot color can be either defined in the RGB or CMYK color model, its main purpose is to be stored with its <i>name</i> in a PDF or PostScript file (hence the term “named color”). The name refers to a real world color reference, like a printed color fan, and a printing company can mix or buy a special ink, which will match exactly the color as specified by the reference. Each spot color requires a separate printing plate, which is why you should use spot colors carefully, because their use makes a printing process more expensive. Typical use cases for spot colors would be very specific hues in corporate logos. The red dot beside a color model icon (RGB or CMYK) indicates that the respective color is a spot color.</td>
<td><p><b>Spot Colors</b>: These are also referred to as &ldquo;named colors,&rdquo; but since other (RGB/CMYK) colors can also have a name, the term &ldquo;spot color&rdquo; is to be preferred for unambiguousness. While a spot color can be either defined in the RGB or CMYK color model, its main purpose is to be stored with its <i>name</i> in a PDF or PostScript file (hence the term “named color”). The name refers to a real world color reference, like a printed color fan, and a printing company can mix or buy a special ink, which will match exactly the color as specified by the reference. Each spot color requires a separate printing plate, which is why you should use spot colors carefully, because their use makes a printing process more expensive. Typical use cases for spot colors would be very specific hues in corporate logos. The red dot beside a color model icon (RGB or CMYK) indicates that the respective color is a spot color.</p></td>
</tr>
<tr valign=top>
<td><img src="images/register.png"></td>
<td></td>
<td><b>Registration Color</b>: This is a special case of a &ldquo;color,&rdquo; which is used for registration marks. The latter are used by printers to determine whether a four-color print run has been successful. While displayed as a CMYK color, it will actually consist of as many colors as there are color separations, one or each printing plate. Each palette can only have one registration color, which is indicated by a &ldquo;bull&rsquo;s eye&rdquo; icon.</td>
<td><p><b>Registration Color</b>: This is a special case of a &ldquo;color,&rdquo; which is used for registration marks. The latter are used by printers to determine whether a four-color print run has been successful. While displayed as a CMYK color, it will actually consist of as many colors as there are color separations, one or each printing plate. Each palette can only have one registration color, which is indicated by a &ldquo;bull&rsquo;s eye&rdquo; icon.</p></td>
<td></td>
</tr>
<tr valign=top>
<td><img src="images/alert.png"></td>
<td></td>
<td>If you are working with activated <a href="cms.html">color management</a>, some or even all colors in a palette may be &ldquo;out of gamut,&rdquo; i.e., depending on a selected ICC profile, a color can&rsquo;t be &ldquo;translated&rdquo; from one color model into another, and a color shift can occur. In such a case you will see a warning sign placed beside the color in the list.</td>
<td><p>If you are working with activated <a href="cms.html">color management</a>, some or even all colors in a palette may be &ldquo;out of gamut,&rdquo; i.e., depending on a selected ICC profile, a color can&rsquo;t be &ldquo;translated&rdquo; from one color model into another, and a color shift can occur. In such a case you will see a warning sign placed beside the color in the list.</p></td>
<td></td>
</tr>
</tbody>
/trunk/Scribus/doc/en/scribuscopyright.html
3,6 → 3,9
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8"/>
<title>Scribus Copyright</title>
</head>
<style>
@import "manual.css";
</style>
<body>
<h2>Scribus Copyright</h2>
<p><i>&copy;2001&ndash;2011 Franz Schmid and rest of the members of the Scribus Team.</i></p>
30,4 → 33,4
 
<p><b>Resources</b>, like the documentation, dictionary files, color profiles, color palettes, or templates, use their own licenses that need not be compatible with any of the licenses mentioned above, because resources are considered to be content, not functional code. <br><i>Note that some of these files, especially some color palettes, are subject to very strict licensing conditions.</i></p>
</body>
</html>
</html>
/trunk/Scribus/doc/en/lipsum.html
3,6 → 3,9
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8"/>
<title>Adding Sample Text in your Language</title>
</head>
<style>
@import "manual.css";
</style>
<body>
<h2>Adding Sample Text in your Language</h2>
<h3>Why Sample Text?</h3>
30,4 → 33,4
<p> To test your sample text, you can copy it to the subdirectory <code>~/share/scribus/loremipsum</code>, whose location will vary depending on your operating system and the way you installed Scribus (e.g. <code>/usr/share/scribus/loremipsum</code> on Linux).</p>
<p>Once you made sure that your significant engineering effort works as expected, head over to the <a href="http://bugs.scribus.net">Scribus bugtracker</a>, file a bug report with the severity &ldquo;Feature&rdquo; and upload your XML file. One of the Scribus developers will add it to the next release of Scribus for all to enjoy.</p>
</body>
</html>
</html>
/trunk/Scribus/doc/en/documentation.html
3,6 → 3,9
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8"/>
<title>Documentation</title>
</head>
<style>
@import "manual.css";
</style>
<body>
<h2>Documentation</h2>
 
/trunk/Scribus/doc/en/editorial.html
3,6 → 3,9
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8"/>
<title>Editorial Notes</title>
</head>
<style>
@import "manual.css";
</style>
<body>
<h2>Editorial Notes</h2>
<h3>General</h3>
/trunk/Scribus/doc/en/toolbox8.html
3,6 → 3,9
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8"/>
<title>ImageMagick</title>
</head>
<style>
@import "manual.css";
</style>
<body>
<h2>ImageMagick</h2>
<p>ImageMagick is a command-line image converter. While it does have a GUI display called &ldquo;Display&rdquo;, its power shows in three ways:</p>
/trunk/Scribus/doc/en/EditingShapes.html
3,9 → 3,12
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8"/>
<title>Editing Shapes</title>
</head>
 
<style>
@import "manual.css";
</style>
<body>
<h2>Editing Shapes</h2>
Many of the objects that can be incorporated into a Scribus document are vector drawings, and as such can be edited. Even though the title seems to refer to the geometric shapes that can be easily created, the same procedures can be applied to all of these:
<p>Many of the objects that can be incorporated into a Scribus document are vector drawings, and as such can be edited. Even though the title seems to refer to the geometric shapes that can be easily created, the same procedures can be applied to all of these:</p>
<ul>
<li>Shapes</li>
<li>Polygons</li>
16,7 → 19,7
<li>Outlines created from text glyphs</li>
<li>Imported vector drawings, such as EPS and SVG</li>
</ul>
As you may be aware or recall, when you consider the ability to convert from one kind of object to another, there is a great deal of flexibility in what you can do. Here we have edited the shape of a text frame, then taken a large glyph, converted to an outline, then converted to an image frame, and finally we take a polygon and convert to a text frame. The final state of the object determines its editing capabilities, so the large B can be edited like any other image frame, the polygon can have its text edited in Story Editor.
<p>As you may be aware or recall, when you consider the ability to convert from one kind of object to another, there is a great deal of flexibility in what you can do. Here we have edited the shape of a text frame, then taken a large glyph, converted to an outline, then converted to an image frame, and finally we take a polygon and convert to a text frame. The final state of the object determines its editing capabilities, so the large B can be edited like any other image frame, the polygon can have its text edited in Story Editor.</p>
<table cellpadding=3><tr>
<td><img src="images/edit_shapes.png" ALT="Edit examples" ALIGN=left></td></tr>
</table>
23,14 → 26,14
 
<h3>Properties: Shape</h3>
<table cellpadding=3><tr>
<td>Here is our Shape tab from Properties, or at least the bigger part of it. We'll get to what's left (Fill Rules) farther down below in <b>Combining Polygons</b>. Let's look at the <b>Round Corners</b> item first, since it's a simple kind of edit, that does what it says. Since the spinbox is active, we know that the object this relates to is either a "regular" frame, like text, image, or render frame, or it's the rectangle shape (and not the 4-sided polygon). What the number in the spinbox refers to is the radius of the corner. You can keep going up on this until 2 adjacent rounding operations meet &ndash; if you start with a square, for example, you will end up with a circle. A rectangle looks more like a capsule with flattened sides and rounded ends. This could just as easily be a text or image frame.</td>
<td><p>Here is our Shape tab from Properties, or at least the bigger part of it. We'll get to what's left (Fill Rules) farther down below in <b>Combining Polygons</b>. Let's look at the <b>Round Corners</b> item first, since it's a simple kind of edit, that does what it says. Since the spinbox is active, we know that the object this relates to is either a "regular" frame, like text, image, or render frame, or it's the rectangle shape (and not the 4-sided polygon). What the number in the spinbox refers to is the radius of the corner. You can keep going up on this until 2 adjacent rounding operations meet &ndash; if you start with a square, for example, you will end up with a circle. A rectangle looks more like a capsule with flattened sides and rounded ends. This could just as easily be a text or image frame.</p></td>
<td rowspan=2><img src="images/prop_shape.png" ALT="Properties: Shape" ALIGN=right></td>
</tr>
<tr><td><img src="images/round_rectangle.png" ALT="Rounded rectangle" ALIGN=left></td></tr>
</table>
<table cellpadding=3><tr>
<td>The next quickie edit is the icon with the drop-down arrow, next to the <b>Edit</b> button. The drop-down lists are the familiar ones from the toolbar shape icon, but this is a transformation, not making a new shape. Thus we can convert our capsule to a squat and overfed-looking Tux if we want.
<p>In fact, we can do this with text and other frames as well, although you can expect the utility of a Tux-shaped text frame to be limited.
<td><p>The next quickie edit is the icon with the drop-down arrow, next to the <b>Edit</b> button. The drop-down lists are the familiar ones from the toolbar shape icon, but this is a transformation, not making a new shape. Thus we can convert our capsule to a squat and overfed-looking Tux if we want.</p>
<p>In fact, we can do this with text and other frames as well, although you can expect the utility of a Tux-shaped text frame to be limited.</p>
</td>
<td><img src="images/squat_tux.png" ALIGN=left></td></tr>
</table>
37,72 → 40,72
<h3>Edit Button</h3>
<table cellpadding="3"><tr>
<td align=center width=200><img src="images/shape_edit.png"></td>
<td>Now we get to the main event here, editing a shape/frame with its nodes and control points. When you click the <b>Edit</b> button on the Shape tab, the <b>Nodes</b> dialog to the right pops up and your shape/frame is transformed something like what you see on the left, with these blue and magenta circles.
<p>Something to note at the outset is that generally where there is a sharp corner in a shape you only see the blue nodes, but where there is a smooth curve of some sort, these magenta control points are visible, sticking out like antennae from the node. Actually, all of these nodes have control points, but you don't see them when they are at the same position as the node.</td>
<td><p>Now we get to the main event here, editing a shape/frame with its nodes and control points. When you click the <b>Edit</b> button on the Shape tab, the <b>Nodes</b> dialog to the right pops up and your shape/frame is transformed something like what you see on the left, with these blue and magenta circles.</p>
<p>Something to note at the outset is that generally where there is a sharp corner in a shape you only see the blue nodes, but where there is a smooth curve of some sort, these magenta control points are visible, sticking out like antennae from the node. Actually, all of these nodes have control points, but you don't see them when they are at the same position as the node.</p></td>
<td rowspan=3 valign=middle><img src="images/nodes_edit.png"></td>
</tr>
<tr><td></td><td><img src="images/node_edit_close.png" ALIGN=right></td>
</tr>
<tr><td colspan=2>As we begin to describe the usage of the shape edit dialog, let's use this numbering scheme to refer to the various buttons on the dialog to the far right.
<p>When the dialog first comes up, button <b>1</b> will be selected, in which case you can move the blue nodes using the mouse. In addition to moving individual nodes, you can click-drag a line segment between nodes and move the segment along with its nodes. The segment retains its size, shape, and orientation &ndash; adjoining line segments do the adjusting.
<p>If you click button <b>5</b>, you can then move the magenta control points. Once you have clicked on a node or control point it turns red, and at this point, in addition to moving it with the mouse, the <b>X-Pos</b> and <b>Y-Pos</b> spinboxes become active and refer to this selected point. If <b>Absolute Coordinates</b> is <b><i>not</i></b> checked, then these numbers are relative to the upper left corner of the bounding box for the frame or shape (<i>see What is a Bounding Box? below</i>). Let's mention at this point that all of our editing steps here are Undo-able, i.e. can be undone with <b>Ctrl-Z</b> in case you change your mind.
<p>Button <b>2</b> allows for adding nodes, though they must be added somewhere along the line of the shape. Button <b>3</b> deletes the node you subsequently click on. The tooltip for button <b>4</b> says <i>Reset Control Points</i>, but it is not clear how to make this button active.
<p>Button <b>6</b>, when clicked, allows for each individual control point to move independently. If button <b>7</b> is clicked, then the two control points at a node will arrange themselves on opposite side of a node and equidistant from it once either one is moved. This tends to produce a very smooth curved transition through the node. When a control point is selected, button <b>8</b> will be active and when clicked, resets the control point to its node's position.
<p>Button <b>9</b> will split the curve/shape when it is checked &ndash; click this button, then click anywhere along the line. It will appear that a node has been created, like using button <b>2</b>, but actually there are now 2 nodes at that position, so that if you move one, you will see the line is broken. Button <b>10</b> performs the opposite procedure, by joining a broken curve or shape (<i>and can also be used to make a closed figure out of a Bezier curve</i>).
<tr><td colspan=2><p>As we begin to describe the usage of the shape edit dialog, let's use this numbering scheme to refer to the various buttons on the dialog to the far right. </p>
<p>When the dialog first comes up, button <b>1</b> will be selected, in which case you can move the blue nodes using the mouse. In addition to moving individual nodes, you can click-drag a line segment between nodes and move the segment along with its nodes. The segment retains its size, shape, and orientation &ndash; adjoining line segments do the adjusting. </p>
<p>If you click button <b>5</b>, you can then move the magenta control points. Once you have clicked on a node or control point it turns red, and at this point, in addition to moving it with the mouse, the <b>X-Pos</b> and <b>Y-Pos</b> spinboxes become active and refer to this selected point. If <b>Absolute Coordinates</b> is <b><i>not</i></b> checked, then these numbers are relative to the upper left corner of the bounding box for the frame or shape (<i>see What is a Bounding Box? below</i>). Let's mention at this point that all of our editing steps here are Undo-able, i.e. can be undone with <b>Ctrl-Z</b> in case you change your mind.</p>
<p>Button <b>2</b> allows for adding nodes, though they must be added somewhere along the line of the shape. Button <b>3</b> deletes the node you subsequently click on. The tooltip for button <b>4</b> says <i>Reset Control Points</i>, but it is not clear how to make this button active.</p>
<p>Button <b>6</b>, when clicked, allows for each individual control point to move independently. If button <b>7</b> is clicked, then the two control points at a node will arrange themselves on opposite side of a node and equidistant from it once either one is moved. This tends to produce a very smooth curved transition through the node. When a control point is selected, button <b>8</b> will be active and when clicked, resets the control point to its node's position.</p>
<p>Button <b>9</b> will split the curve/shape when it is checked &ndash; click this button, then click anywhere along the line. It will appear that a node has been created, like using button <b>2</b>, but actually there are now 2 nodes at that position, so that if you move one, you will see the line is broken. Button <b>10</b> performs the opposite procedure, by joining a broken curve or shape (<i>and can also be used to make a closed figure out of a Bezier curve</i>).</p>
<p>Finishing out these first 3 rows, the unnumbered buttons next to the one we've labeled 10 flip the shape horizontally or vertically, respectively.</td>
</tr></table>
<h3>Skewing</h3>
<table cellpadding=3><tr>
<td>The first full row of buttons below the numbered ones are skewing operations. Each click on the button skews the shape in a small increment. Here we see the results of skewing using the 4 buttons, left to right, just like our images, each being clicked 10 times. Initially, the tops of all these shapes had the same Y-Pos.</td>
<td><p>The first full row of buttons below the numbered ones are skewing operations. Each click on the button skews the shape in a small increment. Here we see the results of skewing using the 4 buttons, left to right, just like our images, each being clicked 10 times. Initially, the tops of all these shapes had the same Y-Pos.</p></td>
<td><img src="images/skewing.png" ALT="Skewing Example"></td>
</tr></table>
<h3>Rotating, Enlarging, Shrinking</h3>
Below the 4 rows of buttons we have spinboxes paired with buttons to the left. These are quite intuitive and the two buttons are complementary actions, for rotation, and then two ways to enlarge and shrink, either by percentage or number of points. Each click produces the amount of change indicated in the spinbox.
<p>
<p>Below the 4 rows of buttons we have spinboxes paired with buttons to the left. These are quite intuitive and the two buttons are complementary actions, for rotation, and then two ways to enlarge and shrink, either by percentage or number of points. Each click produces the amount of change indicated in the spinbox.</p>
<p></p>
<h3>What is a Bounding Box?</h3>
<table cellpadding=3><tr>
<td><img src="images/boundingbox.png" ALIGN=left></td>
<td><img src="images/boundingbox1.png" ALIGN=left></td>
<td>A <i>Bounding Box</i> is the rectangular space that defines the boundaries of a shape and all of its descriptive components. Here we see this illustrated on the far left, noting that the bounding box is much larger than the actual shape. When we go to edit mode in the near left, we see that the box must include all of the control points for the shape.
<p>There is a constraint on the <b>X-Pos</b> and <b>Y-Pos</b> so that they cannot be less than 0.0 when referring to the Bounding Box, so you will not be able to use the spinboxes to move nodes or control points lower than this value. Nonetheless, they can be moved with the mouse and the bounding box's left upper corner will then reposition. Using <b>Absolute Coordinates</b> is another workaround, since these values can be less than zero.
<p><b>Use Bounding Box</b> is one of the choices for Text Flow mode, as shown in the Shape tab graphic.
<td><p>A <i>Bounding Box</i> is the rectangular space that defines the boundaries of a shape and all of its descriptive components. Here we see this illustrated on the far left, noting that the bounding box is much larger than the actual shape. When we go to edit mode in the near left, we see that the box must include all of the control points for the shape.</p>
<p>There is a constraint on the <b>X-Pos</b> and <b>Y-Pos</b> so that they cannot be less than 0.0 when referring to the Bounding Box, so you will not be able to use the spinboxes to move nodes or control points lower than this value. Nonetheless, they can be moved with the mouse and the bounding box's left upper corner will then reposition. Using <b>Absolute Coordinates</b> is another workaround, since these values can be less than zero.</p>
<p><b>Use Bounding Box</b> is one of the choices for Text Flow mode, as shown in the Shape tab graphic.</p>
</td>
</tr></table>
<br clear=all>
<h3>Finally: What is a Contour Line?</h3>
Or maybe we should say, what is it for? A contour line is itself never visible, except in this editing mode. Let's imagine you have a frame/shape which is not rectangular, and you wish to flow around it, but not necessarily follow the contours of the frame/shape. Even if it's a shape and has a bounding box, as we saw above sometimes the bounding box is not what we want either, therefore we can use a contour line to flow in our precisely desired way. While you are editing your contour line, you will see the text flow change to help you get the look you want.
<p>Or maybe we should say, what is it for? A contour line is itself never visible, except in this editing mode. Let's imagine you have a frame/shape which is not rectangular, and you wish to flow around it, but not necessarily follow the contours of the frame/shape. Even if it's a shape and has a bounding box, as we saw above sometimes the bounding box is not what we want either, therefore we can use a contour line to flow in our precisely desired way. While you are editing your contour line, you will see the text flow change to help you get the look you want.</p>
<table cellpadding=3><tr>
<td><img src="images/frame_shape_flow.png" ALIGN=left></td>
<td><img src="images/contourline_flow.png" ALIGN=left></td>
</tr></table>
<p>Contour lines are not considered part of the graphic components, so therefore its nodes and control points can be outside the bounding box.
<p>Contour lines are not considered part of the graphic components, so therefore its nodes and control points can be outside the bounding box.</p>
<h3>Combining Polygons</h3>
This operation really applies to both polygons and shapes, and mixtures of the two. The idea is to combine 2 or more shapes on different levels into a single one.
<p>This operation really applies to both polygons and shapes, and mixtures of the two. The idea is to combine 2 or more shapes on different levels into a single one.</p>
<table cellpadding=3><tr>
<td><img src="images/combine_polygons.png"></td>
<td><img src="images/combine_polygons1.png"></td>
<td><img src="images/combine_polygons3.png"></td>
</tr></table>
This top row shows our starting point, with a shape overlapping a polygon, the shape having some transparency. In the middle, we select both by click-dragging the mouse around them, then select <b>Item > Combine Polygons</b> from the menu, to get what we see on the right. With this method, the colors derive from the bottom object.
<p>This top row shows our starting point, with a shape overlapping a polygon, the shape having some transparency. In the middle, we select both by click-dragging the mouse around them, then select <b>Item > Combine Polygons</b> from the menu, to get what we see on the right. With this method, the colors derive from the bottom object.</p>
<table><tr>
<td><img src="images/combine_polygons2.png"></td>
<td><img src="images/combine_polygons4.png"></td>
<td><img src="images/combine_polygons5.png"></td>
</tr></table>
In the left graphic here, we selected the shapes by holding down Shift and clicking the cross shape first, then combined, so even if you combine more than two shapes this way, the colors derive from the first one clicked. The middle shows that our combined polygon has retained the transparency. On the right, we see the results of <b>Item > Split Polygons</b>. It is not recommended to Undo combined polygons, since results are unpredictable and may cause a subsequent crash, depending on what you do next.
<p>Something else to point out here is that in the bottom row, the leftmost combination uses an <b>Even-Odd Fill Rule</b> from the Shape tab, and the middle uses <b>Non Zero</b>. <i>You apply the fill rule after you combine polygons</i>.
<p>In the left graphic here, we selected the shapes by holding down Shift and clicking the cross shape first, then combined, so even if you combine more than two shapes this way, the colors derive from the first one clicked. The middle shows that our combined polygon has retained the transparency. On the right, we see the results of <b>Item > Split Polygons</b>. It is not recommended to Undo combined polygons, since results are unpredictable and may cause a subsequent crash, depending on what you do next.</p>
<p>Something else to point out here is that in the bottom row, the leftmost combination uses an <b>Even-Odd Fill Rule</b> from the Shape tab, and the middle uses <b>Non Zero</b>. <i>You apply the fill rule after you combine polygons</i>.</p>
<h3>Path Operations</h3>
These are some improved methods for combining shapes and polygons in various ways. They can only be applied to shapes and polygons, not text or image frames, though once again, conversion to text or images frames is still possible later.
<p>These are some improved methods for combining shapes and polygons in various ways. They can only be applied to shapes and polygons, not text or image frames, though once again, conversion to text or images frames is still possible later.</p>
<table><tr><td><img src="images/pathops.png" alt="pathops.png" ALIGN=right></td>
<td>Let's start with this situation, two standard shapes. First, select both shapes, and then select from the menu <br><b>Item > Path Tools > Path Operations...</b>
<br>If you don't select both shapes, you will not be able to make this menu selection.</td>
<td><p>Let's start with this situation, two standard shapes. First, select both shapes, and then select from the menu <br><b>Item > Path Tools > Path Operations...</b>
<br>If you don't select both shapes, you will not be able to make this menu selection.</p></td>
</tr><tr>
<td><img src="images/pathops1.png" alt="pathops1.png" ALIGN=left></td>
<td>What you get from this is the dialog to the left.
<br>Notice that a color has been assigned to the doughnut shape. This is merely for clarity to more easily see what will happen. If neither shape had a fill color, they would be assigned contrasting colors. <b>Swap Shapes</b> simply reverses the position of the two shapes, so that the first shape becomes the second.
<p>Staying with this initial default choice of combining the shapes, we see to the right that we must choose which color the final shape will have &ndash; just as with <i>Combining Polygons</i>, the final shape can only have one set of colors for <b>Fill</b> and <b>Stroke</b>. As you can see, there is an option for choosing other colors for each, using the <b>Custom Colors</b> radio button.
<p>What about the <b>Keep</b> button? If chosen, this will retain the elements of the shape. Perhaps best to illustrate the difference between the two with the examples below.
<p>On the left below is when you do <i>not</i> check <b>Keep</b>, and to its right what happens when you <i>do</i> check <b>Keep</b>. It's also worth repeating that we stayed with using the First Shape for color choices.
<td><p>What you get from this is the dialog to the left.
<br>Notice that a color has been assigned to the doughnut shape. This is merely for clarity to more easily see what will happen. If neither shape had a fill color, they would be assigned contrasting colors. <b>Swap Shapes</b> simply reverses the position of the two shapes, so that the first shape becomes the second.</p>
<p>Staying with this initial default choice of combining the shapes, we see to the right that we must choose which color the final shape will have &ndash; just as with <i>Combining Polygons</i>, the final shape can only have one set of colors for <b>Fill</b> and <b>Stroke</b>. As you can see, there is an option for choosing other colors for each, using the <b>Custom Colors</b> radio button.</p>
<p>What about the <b>Keep</b> button? If chosen, this will retain the elements of the shape. Perhaps best to illustrate the difference between the two with the examples below.</p>
<p>On the left below is when you do <i>not</i> check <b>Keep</b>, and to its right what happens when you <i>do</i> check <b>Keep</b>. It's also worth repeating that we stayed with using the First Shape for color choices.</p>
<table><tr><td><img src="images/pathops2.png" alt="pathops2.png"></td><td><img src="images/pathops3.png" alt="pathops3.png"></td>
</tr></table>
</td>
115,22 → 118,22
</table>
<p>
<table>
<tr><td></td><td ALIGN=center><b>Break Apart pulled apart</b></td></tr>
<tr><td width=450px VALIGN=top><b>Break Apart</b> has some interesting features. You may recall that above I said that the final shape could only have one sort of fill color, so what happened here? In contrast to all other choices, with <i>Break Apart</i> I can specify a color for the <i>intersection</i> of the two shapes, so here I have chosen a custom color. What you then find is the meaning of the <i>Break Apart</i> name &ndash; these are really 3 separate shapes now, which I can move apart if I wish. After that, conversion of these to other kinds of frames is also possible, as seen here, and also note that the upper right shape behaves as one image frame.
<p>A final note with <i>Path Operations</i> is that <b>Undo</b> will likely have some effect, but will not reverse whatever operation you carried out here.</td>
<tr><td></td><td ALIGN=center><p><b>Break Apart pulled apart</b></p></td></tr>
<tr><td width=450px VALIGN=top><p><b>Break Apart</b> has some interesting features. You may recall that above I said that the final shape could only have one sort of fill color, so what happened here? In contrast to all other choices, with <i>Break Apart</i> I can specify a color for the <i>intersection</i> of the two shapes, so here I have chosen a custom color. What you then find is the meaning of the <i>Break Apart</i> name &ndash; these are really 3 separate shapes now, which I can move apart if I wish. After that, conversion of these to other kinds of frames is also possible, as seen here, and also note that the upper right shape behaves as one image frame.</p>
<p>A final note with <i>Path Operations</i> is that <b>Undo</b> will likely have some effect, but will not reverse whatever operation you carried out here.</p></td>
<td COLSPAN=3><img src="images/pathops8.png"></td>
</tr>
</table>
<h3>Create Path from Stroke</h3>
If you have a <i>single</i> shape selected, this will be an option under <b>Item > Path Tools</b>. The name for this operation is admittedly a bit obtuse, so once again simply showing what it does is more worthwhile.
<p>If you have a <i>single</i> shape selected, this will be an option under <b>Item > Path Tools</b>. The name for this operation is admittedly a bit obtuse, so once again simply showing what it does is more worthwhile.</p>
<table width=70% cellpadding=10><tr>
<td><img src="images/pathtools.png"></td>
<td>To do this, let's create a rectangular shape, and increase its stroke width to 10 points.<br>Now select <br><b>Item > Path Tools > Create Path from Stroke</b>,<br>at which point, your reaction is likely that nothing has changed, except if you had a fill color, it will have disappeared. Now, change the fill color from <i>None</i> to some color, here red, and then zoom in on your rectangle.</td></tr>
<td><p>To do this, let's create a rectangular shape, and increase its stroke width to 10 points.<br>Now select <br><b>Item > Path Tools > Create Path from Stroke</b>,<br>at which point, your reaction is likely that nothing has changed, except if you had a fill color, it will have disappeared. Now, change the fill color from <i>None</i> to some color, here red, and then zoom in on your rectangle.</p></td></tr>
<tr><td><img src="images/pathtools1.png"></td>
<td>In the upper left corner of the rectangle, seen at about 900% zoom, we begin to understand what happened. The space which was formerly the border (stroke) is now the fill, and there has been applied a stroke to the boundaries of this (I have increased the hairline stroke to 1 point so that it is clearer).
<p>If we had started with a red color to the stroke, then the new stroke would also have been red.</td></tr>
<td><p>In the upper left corner of the rectangle, seen at about 900% zoom, we begin to understand what happened. The space which was formerly the border (stroke) is now the fill, and there has been applied a stroke to the boundaries of this (I have increased the hairline stroke to 1 point so that it is clearer).</p>
<p>If we had started with a red color to the stroke, then the new stroke would also have been red.</p></td></tr>
<tr><td><img src="images/pathtools2.png"></td>
<td>To even better understand what has happened, let's convert this to an image frame and load an image. Now we can see that the space of the frame is limited to the original stroke space, so in a sense we have created a picture frame from this original rectangle.</td>
<td><p>To even better understand what has happened, let's convert this to an image frame and load an image. Now we can see that the space of the frame is limited to the original stroke space, so in a sense we have created a picture frame from this original rectangle.</p></td>
</tr></table>
</body>
</html>
/trunk/Scribus/doc/en/install1.html
3,6 → 3,9
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8"/>
<title>How to obtain the Scribus Source Code</title>
</head>
<style>
@import "manual.css";
</style>
<body>
<h2>How to Obtain the Scribus Source Code</h2>
<p>You can get a tarball of the most recent release of Scribus from Sourceforge: <a href="http://sourceforge.net/projects/scribus/files/"> http://sourceforge.net/projects/scribus/files/</a>.</p>
/trunk/Scribus/doc/en/toolbox12.html
3,6 → 3,9
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8"/>
<title>A little WINE with Scribus</title>
</head>
<style>
@import "manual.css";
</style>
<body>
<h2>A little WINE with Scribus</h2>
<h3>Overview</h3>
/trunk/Scribus/doc/en/pagetemplate1.html
3,6 → 3,9
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8"/>
<title>Working with Master Pages</title>
</head>
<style>
@import "manual.css";
</style>
<body>
<h2>Working with Master Pages</h2>
20,12 → 23,12
<p> The Master Page dialog shown above offers four options, from left to right:
<ul>
<li><b>Add new Master Page</b>: If you click on this icon, a new dialog pops up. Here you have to enter a name for the new Master Page. Depending on your document layout, you also have to determine the Master Page category (e.g. left page, right page). Clicking OK will create your new Master Page, and you can edit this page immediately.</li>
<b>Duplicate Master Page</b>: This will create a copy of the Master Page you have selected in the dialog. Since a new Master Page is created that way, you will also see the prompt to insert a name. Copying a Master Page is helpful if you are working with documents that use a mostly identical design and only vary in details. Thus, you can create a basic design and create duplicates, in which only the changing details are modified.</li>
<li><b>Duplicate Master Page</b>: This will create a copy of the Master Page you have selected in the dialog. Since a new Master Page is created that way, you will also see the prompt to insert a name. Copying a Master Page is helpful if you are working with documents that use a mostly identical design and only vary in details. Thus, you can create a basic design and create duplicates, in which only the changing details are modified.</li>
<li><b>Import Master Pages</b>: Clicking this button brings up a file dialog, in which you need to select a Scribus file. After selecting a file and clicking &ldquo;OK&rdquo;, Scribus will open a new dialog that allows you to select a Master Page from the document for import into Scribus. This feature is most useful when you have split a large project into several smaller files (which is always recommended), as you don't have to create a new Master Page for each project file.<br>
<table width="100%"><tr><td align="center"><img src="images/mpage2.png" title="Page Palette" alt="Page Palette" align="center" /></td></tr></table></li>
<li><b>Delete Master Page</b>: This will delete the Master Page you have selected in the file dialog. If the Master Page is already in use, you will be asked for a replacement.</li>
</ul>
</p>Another way to create a new Master Page is to convert an existing page into a Master Page via <i>Page > Convert to Master Page</i>. As with any new Master Page you will be asked to insert a name for the new page, as well as determining the category. If you check the option &ldquo;Copy Applied Master Page Items&rdquo;, the Master Page that is applied to the current page will be merged with the latter into one new Master Page. Otherwise, only the items on the &ldquo;real&rdquo; page become part of the new Master Page.</p>
<p>Another way to create a new Master Page is to convert an existing page into a Master Page via <i>Page > Convert to Master Page</i>. As with any new Master Page you will be asked to insert a name for the new page, as well as determining the category. If you check the option &ldquo;Copy Applied Master Page Items&rdquo;, the Master Page that is applied to the current page will be merged with the latter into one new Master Page. Otherwise, only the items on the &ldquo;real&rdquo; page become part of the new Master Page.</p>
<table width="100%"><tr><td align="center"><img src="images/mpage3.png" title="Page Palette" alt="Page Palette" align="center" /></td></tr></table>
 
<h4>Applying Master Pages</h4>
56,4 → 59,4
 
 
</body>
</html>
</html>
/trunk/Scribus/doc/en/importhints2.html
3,6 → 3,9
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8"/>
<title>Importing Vector Drawings</title>
</head>
<style>
@import "manual.css";
</style>
<body>
<h2>Importing Vector Drawings</h2>
<h3>Supported formats</h3>
74,4 → 77,4
</ul>
</p>
</body>
</html>
</html>
/trunk/Scribus/doc/en/color6.html
3,6 → 3,9
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8"/>
<title>Color Palettes in Scribus (4): dtp studio Colors</title>
</head>
<style>
@import "manual.css";
</style>
<body>
<h2>Color Palettes in Scribus (4): dtp studio Colors</h2>
<p>The following color palettes have been donated by <a href="http://www.dtpstudio.de/english/index.htm">dtp studio Oldenburg</a>, a company that is specialized in color measurement and color related software products, among them <a href="http://www.colouratlas.com" target="_blank">Digital Colour Atlas</a>, a software that contains many more palettes for use with Scribus, as well as additional useful features, such as color calculations for hundreds of color systems and all relevant color models.</p>
227,4 → 230,4
</table>
<br>
</body>
</html>
</html>
/trunk/Scribus/doc/en/cms2.html
3,6 → 3,9
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8"/>
<title>Color Management Setup</title>
</head>
<style>
@import "manual.css";
</style>
<body>
<h2>Color Management Setup</h2>
<p><strong>Getting good previews from color management depends on at least the following steps from the user:</strong></p>
/trunk/Scribus/doc/en/WwFill.html
3,6 → 3,10
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8"/>
<title>Working with Fill: Colors, Gradients and Patterns</title>
</head>
<style>
@import "manual.css";
</style>
<body>
<h2>Working with Fill: Colors, Gradients and Patterns</h2>
<h3>Fill Colors</h3>
<p>Let&rsquo;s first talk about the most intuitive part of using a solid color as a fill for a frame by simply choosing a color from your current color set when &ldquo;Normal&rdquo; is chosen from the drop-down list just below the icon buttons for <i>Edit Line Color Properties</i> and <i>Edit Fill Color Properties</i>. <a href="color1.html">Remember</a> that in order to switch to a different color set you must go to <i>Edit > Colors&nbsp;...</i> with no document open.</p>
/trunk/Scribus/doc/en/color7b.html
3,6 → 3,9
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8"/>
<title>Color Palettes in Scribus (6a): Galaxy Color Harmonizer</title>
</head>
<style>
@import "manual.css";
</style>
<body>
<h2>Color Palettes in Scribus (6a): Galaxy Color Harmonizer</h2>
<p>In addition to Scribus&rsquo;s built-in <a href="colorwheel.html">Color Wheel</a>, you can also use the <a href="color7a.html">Galaxy</a> Color Harmonizer to create color harmonies. The major difference between the Scribus Color Wheel and the Galaxy Color Harmonizer is the color model: RYB (Scribus) vs. CMYK (Galaxy).</p>
19,9 → 22,9
<table>
<tbody>
<tr>
<td><b>Choose two colors within two or three sectors.</b><br>Make sure colors have enough contrast to avoid blending with each other.<br>Example: C100, C100/M50</td>
<td><p><b>Choose two colors within two or three sectors.</b><br>Make sure colors have enough contrast to avoid blending with each other.<br>Example: C100, C100/M50</p></td>
<td width="5%"></td>
<td><b>Choose a four-color combination.</b><br>Start on any color and move around the circle, landig on every sixth color.<br>Example: M100/Y100, C50/Y100, C100, C50/M100</td>
<td><p><b>Choose a four-color combination.</b><br>Start on any color and move around the circle, landig on every sixth color.<br>Example: M100/Y100, C50/Y100, C100, C50/M100</p></td>
</tr>
<tr>
<td><img src="images/CH_1.png" align="center"/></td>
29,9 → 32,9
<td><img src="images/CH_5.png" align="center"/></td>
</tr>
<tr>
<td><br><br><b>Choose two colors opposite of each other on the circle.</b><br>These are the color&rsquo;s <i>opposing</i> hues.<br>Example: M100, C100/Y100</td>
<td><p><b>Choose two colors opposite of each other on the circle.</b><br>These are the color&rsquo;s <i>opposing</i> hues.<br>Example: M100, C100/Y100</p></td>
<td></td>
<td><br><br><b>Using prior methods, move toward the center of the circle, making color darker by adding black (K).</b><br>Example: C100/Y100/K25, M100/K25</td>
<td><br><br><p><b>Using prior methods, move toward the center of the circle, making color darker by adding black (K).</b><br>Example: C100/Y100/K25, M100/K25</p></td>
</tr>
<tr>
<td><img src="images/CH_2.png" align="center"/></td>
39,9 → 42,9
<td><img src="images/CH_6.png" align="center"/></td>
</tr>
<tr>
<td><br><br><b>Choose a color&rsquo;s related hue by moving either six spaces clockwise or six six spaces anti-clockwise.</b><br>Example: C50/M100, C100</td>
<td><br><br><p><b>Choose a color&rsquo;s related hue by moving either six spaces clockwise or six six spaces anti-clockwise.</b><br>Example: C50/M100, C100</p></td>
<td></td>
<td><br><br><b>Using prior methods, move toward center of circle, making colors lighter.</b><br>Example: C50, C50/Y25</td>
<td><br><br><p><b>Using prior methods, move toward center of circle, making colors lighter.</b><br>Example: C50, C50/Y25</p></td>
</tr>
<tr>
<td><img src="images/CH_3.png" align="center"/></td>
49,9 → 52,9
<td><img src="images/CH_7.png" align="center"/></td>
</tr>
<tr>
<td><br><br><b>Choose a 3-color combination.</b><br>Start on any color and move around the circle, landing on every eighth color.<br>Example: C50/M100, M50/Y100, C100/Y50</td>
<td><br><br><p><b>Choose a 3-color combination.</b><br>Start on any color and move around the circle, landing on every eighth color.<br>Example: C50/M100, M50/Y100, C100/Y50</p></td>
<td></td>
<td><br><br><b>When using any of these methods, choose one color as a primary, and other color(s) as secondary or accent.</b></td>
<td><br><br><p><b>When using any of these methods, choose one color as a primary, and other color(s) as secondary or accent.</b></p></td>
</tr>
<tr>
<td><img src="images/CH_4.png" align="center"/></td>
66,4 → 69,4
<br>
<br>
</body>
</html>
</html>
/trunk/Scribus/doc/en/resources.html
3,6 → 3,9
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8"/>
<title>Community Resources</title>
</head>
<style>
@import "manual.css";
</style>
<body>
<h2>Community Resources</h2>
<p>The <strong>scribus mailing list</strong> is on-line at <a href="http://lists.scribus.info/mailman/listinfo/scribus">http://lists.scribus.info/mailman/listinfo/scribus</a>. There is a multi-lingual interface to the mailing list manager. This list is for end-user support and DTP discussion. </p>
/trunk/Scribus/doc/en/toolbox5.html
3,6 → 3,9
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8"/>
<title>Ghostscript &ndash; Black Box Magic</title>
</head>
<style>
@import "manual.css";
</style>
<body>
<h2>Ghostscript &ndash; Black Box Magic</h2>
<h3>What is Ghostscript?</h3>
/trunk/Scribus/doc/en/renderframes.html
1,5 → 1,8
<body>
<head><TITLE>Render Frames</TITLE></head>
<style>
@import "manual.css";
</style>
<body>
<h2>Introduction</h2>
<p>Since version 1.3.5 Scribus offers a powerful new feature called Render Frames. Originally planned as a means to insert formulas into
134,4 → 137,4
<br></br>
<p>In addition, you have the option to start with an empty frame. By checking &ldquo;Force DPI,&rdquo; Scribus will render the output of every Render Frame with the resolution set in the spinbox to the right. It's set to 72 dpi by default for performance reasons. If you want to produce a document for professional printing, you will want to choose a higher resolution.</p>
</body>
</html>
</html>
/trunk/Scribus/doc/en/print4.html
3,6 → 3,9
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8"/>
<title>Preparing files for Commercial Printing</title>
</head>
<style>
@import "manual.css";
</style>
<body>
<h2>Preparing files for Commercial Printing</h2>
<p>If you have never dealt with a commercial printer, your overriding mindset should be to not be intimidated by the process. You are paying for a service, and therefore entitled to understand your options, and in addition, you will find that an understanding of the printer&rsquo;s requirements will help you create a file they can use without problems. Preventing misunderstandings and making the printing company aware in advance of your goals will probably help to prevent most potential issues. If you do not get satisfactory answers from a company, you should shop around. The printing business is competitive &ndash; the best offer both technical savvy and customer-friendly advice and service. </p>
/trunk/Scribus/doc/en/multiple_transform.html
2,13 → 2,17
 
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8">
<title>Multiple Duplicate and Transform</title>
</head><body>
</head>
<style>
@import "manual.css";
</style>
<body>
<h2>Multiple Duplicate and Transform</h2>
<p>Duplicating items on a page with precision is an important feature of every layout or drawing application. While it&lsquo;s always possible to use a simple copy and paste operation to duplicate an object, letting the computer calculate the position of duplicates can make life easier and save a lot of time. Scribus offers two powerful and versatile tools for the creation and the placement of copied items: <b>Multiple Duplicate</b> and <b>Transform</b>. In some ways, these two feature are quite similar, but each allows for slightly different approaches to making multiple copies of some object on your page.
</p>
<h3>Multiple Duplicate</h3>
<p>Let&lsquo;s just mention briefly that <b>Duplicate</b> (<i>Item > Duplicate</i> or Ctrl+D) is a simple operation, making a copy of your selected object, with a displacement of 10 points in each of the X and Y directions. If you wish to specify another form of placement automatically, then use <b>Multiple Duplicate</b> and make just one copy.</p>
<table width="90%"><tr><td valign="top"><table cellpadding="5px"><tr><td>Prior to 1.3.5, Multiple Duplicate (<i>Item > Multiple Duplicate</i>) was a simple process of making one or more copies of an object with successive X and Y offsets from one copy to the next. It still can work that way, but first we&lsquo;ll have a look at what may be a more useful method &ndash; creating rows and columns. This is not creating a table, but a simple repetitive array of your selected object.<p></p>
<table width="90%"><tr><td valign="top"><table cellpadding="5px"><tr><td><p>Prior to 1.3.5, Multiple Duplicate (<i>Item > Multiple Duplicate</i>) was a simple process of making one or more copies of an object with successive X and Y offsets from one copy to the next. It still can work that way, but first we&lsquo;ll have a look at what may be a more useful method &ndash; creating rows and columns. This is not creating a table, but a simple repetitive array of your selected object.</p>
<p>To the right, we see the &ldquo;By Rows and Columns&rdquo; tab. The settings you see in the dialog will result in the montage you see below. One
feature to notice is that &ldquo;Horizontal Gap&rdquo; refers to these <i>vertical spaces</i> between columns.</p>
</td></tr>
17,7 → 21,7
<td><img src="images/multipledup_rows.png"/></td>
</tr>
</table>
<table width="90%" cellpadding="5"><tbody><tr><td valign="top">Now to the right we see the other tab, &ldquo;By Number of Copies&rdquo;. This works similar to how Multiple Duplicate did in previous versions, but even here we see the option for creating a gap between copies rather than just shifting by some absolute amount, which does still remain an option. The settings here will produce one of the rows you see in the above example. Notice that 3 <i>copies</i> in addition to the original produces 4 columns.<p></p>
<table width="90%" cellpadding="5"><tbody><tr><td valign="top"><p>Now to the right we see the other tab, &ldquo;By Number of Copies&rdquo;. This works similar to how Multiple Duplicate did in previous versions, but even here we see the option for creating a gap between copies rather than just shifting by some absolute amount, which does still remain an option. The settings here will produce one of the rows you see in the above example. Notice that 3 <i>copies</i> in addition to the original produces 4 columns.</p>
<p>You may also notice the spinbox labeled <b>Rotation</b> in this dialog, and thus you can also add some rotation to each successive object. In the example below, 3 copies were made, with an 8-point gap and 10° rotation from one to the next.</p>
<p>The dotted line you see is a horizontal guide placed to show that the axis of rotation is around the basepoint, in this case the upper left
corner of the frame. Also see how the content rotates with the frame &ndash; below we will see how <b>Transform</b> is quite different in this regard.</p>
26,7 → 30,7
<tr><td colspan="2"><img src="images/multipledup_rotation.png"></td></tr>
</tbody></table>
<h3>Transform</h3>
In its simplest usage, <b>Transform</b> (<i>Item > Transform</i>) can modify an object in one or more of the following ways:
<p>In its simplest usage, <b>Transform</b> (<i>Item > Transform</i>) can modify an object in one or more of the following ways:</p>
<ul>
<li>Scaling</li>
<li>Translation</li>
54,4 → 58,4
<p>We can of course avoid these content considerations if we are using Transform on a shape or polygon. A limitation of Transform is that there is no way of trying out settings such as a preview, and no way to save a set of operations for later use, so one ends up with trial and error, and either remembering settings or taking notes to try out various settings. So with this in mind, here is an example of a tranformed arrow, about 41 points in width, rotated 30° and then translated 46 points, for 11 copies:</p>
<img src="images/transform_translaterotation1.png">
<p>Math helps us a bit here. Rotating 30° for 11 copies adds up to 330°, so this would be expected to fill in the circle as we see here. Ideally, one may need to play with translation or the basepoint to try to get the desired effect.</p>
</body></html>
</body></html>
/trunk/Scribus/doc/en/about2.html
3,6 → 3,9
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8"/>
<title>Scribus Basics</title>
</head>
<style>
@import "manual.css";
</style>
<body>
 
<h2>Scribus Basics</h2>
/trunk/Scribus/doc/en/pdfexport2.html
3,6 → 3,9
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8"/>
<title>PDF Export Targets</title>
</head>
<style>
@import "manual.css";
</style>
<body>
<h2>PDF Export Targets</h2>
 
9,18 → 12,18
<p>There are basically four kinds of PDF export targets. It&rsquo;s important that you consider the hints below <i>before</i> you start creating your documents.</p>
<ol>
<li>
<p><strong>Press Optimized:</strong> All <a href="importhints.html">bitmap images</a> brought into to Scribus as placed images should have a minimum resolution of 200&nbsp;dpi and preferably 300&nbsp;dpi or more for photos or TIFFs. For line art or vector graphics converted to a bitmap image, an even higher resolution may be necessary for best results. Most vector files can be <a href="importhints2.html">imported directly</a> as native Scribus objects, which is recommended if possible. Output target in the PDF Export dialog: &ldquo;Printer,&rdquo; unless you export to <a href="pdfx3.html">PDF/X-3</a>.</p>
<strong>Press Optimized:</strong> All <a href="importhints.html">bitmap images</a> brought into to Scribus as placed images should have a minimum resolution of 200&nbsp;dpi and preferably 300&nbsp;dpi or more for photos or TIFFs. For line art or vector graphics converted to a bitmap image, an even higher resolution may be necessary for best results. Most vector files can be <a href="importhints2.html">imported directly</a> as native Scribus objects, which is recommended if possible. Output target in the PDF Export dialog: &ldquo;Printer,&rdquo; unless you export to <a href="pdfx3.html">PDF/X-3</a>.
</li>
<li>
<p><strong>Print Optimized:</strong> This would mean targeting the PDF for printing on an office laser-jet or ink-jet. Recommended settings: Down-sample all images to 300&nbsp;dpi or less, embed fonts and keep your page margins with enough tolerance for margin limits on desktop and common office printers (approx. 6/10th of an inch or 1.5&nbsp;cm). <b>Do not choose &ldquo;Printer&rdquo; as an output target, but use &ldquo;Screen/Web&rdquo; instead, as ink-jet and laser-jet printers expect RGB input.</b></p>
<strong>Print Optimized:</strong> This would mean targeting the PDF for printing on an office laser-jet or ink-jet. Recommended settings: Down-sample all images to 300&nbsp;dpi or less, embed fonts and keep your page margins with enough tolerance for margin limits on desktop and common office printers (approx. 6/10th of an inch or 1.5&nbsp;cm). <b>Do not choose &ldquo;Printer&rdquo; as an output target, but use &ldquo;Screen/Web&rdquo; instead, as ink-jet and laser-jet printers expect RGB input.</b>
</li>
<li>
<p><strong>Web download, screen reading, interactive forms:</strong> See the section on <a href="pdfexport3.html">Screen/Web export</a>.</p>
<strong>Web download, screen reading, interactive forms:</strong> See the section on <a href="pdfexport3.html">Screen/Web export</a>.
</li>
<li>
<p><strong>Presentation Effects:</strong> See the section on <a href="pdfexport4.html">PDF presentations</a>.</p>
<strong>Presentation Effects:</strong> See the section on <a href="pdfexport4.html">PDF presentations</a>.
</li>
 
</ol>
</body>
</html>
</html>
/trunk/Scribus/doc/en/toolbox17.html
3,6 → 3,9
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8"/>
<title>SwatchBooker</title>
</head>
<style>
@import "manual.css";
</style>
<body>
<h2>SwatchBooker</h2>
<p>Just like old habits die hard, many designers rely on color palettes from vendors like Pantone&reg;, HKS&reg;, Toyo&reg;, or others, and especially those that have been shipped with the drawing or design application they&rsquo;ve been used to for years or decades.</p>
/trunk/Scribus/doc/en/layers.html
3,6 → 3,9
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8"/>
<title>Working with Layers</title>
</head>
<style>
@import "manual.css";
</style>
<body>
<h3>Working with Layers</h3>
<p>You may know the concept of layers from drawing or image editing software. Layers can be used for many different purposes, for example for separating printable and non-printable items like grids, to create multiple-language versions of a document in a single file or simply to ease editing certain objects without affecting others.</p>
58,4 → 61,4
</table>
 
</body>
</html>
</html>
/trunk/Scribus/doc/en/color3.html
3,6 → 3,9
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8"/>
<title>Color Palettes in Scribus (1)</title>
</head>
<style>
@import "manual.css";
</style>
<body>
<h2>Color Palettes in Scribus (1): Open Source Palettes</h2>
<p>Note that all color palettes described here and in subsequent sections include three basic colors: 100% CMYK Black (C:&nbsp;100, M:&nbsp;100, Y:&nbsp;100, K:&nbsp;100), 100% CMYK White (C:&nbsp;0, M:&nbsp;0, Y:&nbsp;0, K:&nbsp;0), and the <a href="color1.html">Registration Color</a>. These will not be counted as separate colors in the tables.</p>
196,4 → 199,4
<br>
<br>
</body>
</html>
</html>
/trunk/Scribus/doc/en/colorwheel.html
3,12 → 3,15
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8"/>
<title>The Color Wheel</title>
</head>
<style>
@import "manual.css";
</style>
<body>
 
<h2>The Color Wheel</h2>
<table width="90%" cellpadding="5">
<tr><td><img src="images/RYB_color_wheel.png" title="The RYB color wheel" alt="The RYB color wheel"/>
<p><i>The RYB color wheel</i></td>
<p><i>The RYB color wheel</i></p></td>
<td><p>Originally created as a tool to visualize the <i>physical spectrum</i> of <i>all</i> colors by scientists like Isaac Newton, a color wheel (or circle) nowadays is a tool used by artists and designers to select colors based on <i>color perception</i>. Like the <a href="color1.html">RGB and CMY(K) color models</a>, a color wheel is making use of the concept of <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Primary_color">primary colors</a>, in this case red, yellow and blue, hence the abbreviation RYB. While other color wheels, based on the RGB or CMY(K) models, are available, the Scribus Color Wheel follows the traditional &ldquo;artistic&rdquo; or &ldquo;perceptional&rdquo; approach, since this is the way to (almost always) guarantee visually pleasing results in design by using mathematical formulas based on Goethe&rsquo;s and his successors&rsquo; observations and research.</p>
</tr>
</table>
44,16 → 47,16
<tr><td><p><b>Split Complementary:</b></p></td></tr>
<tr><td align="center"><img src="images/cw-splitcompl_20.png" title="The Color Wheel dialog" alt="The Color Wheel dialog"/><br />Angle = 20
<p><img src="images/cw-splitcompl_40.png" title="The Color Wheel dialog" alt="The Color Wheel dialog"/><br />Angle = 40</td>
<td align="left">The base color is farthest to the right.<br />This is in essence a combination of Analogous and Complementary. The first two colors (left to right) are analogous to the base color, separated by our chosen angle. The next two colors are complementary to each of these analogous colors.</td>
<td align="left"><p>The base color is farthest to the right.<br />This is in essence a combination of Analogous and Complementary. The first two colors (left to right) are analogous to the base color, separated by our chosen angle. The next two colors are complementary to each of these analogous colors.</p></td>
</tr>
<tr><td><p><b>Triadic:</b></p></td></tr>
<tr><td align="center"><img src="images/cw-triadic.png" title="The Color Wheel dialog" alt="The Color Wheel dialog"/><br />Base color to the right</td>
<td align="left">Another simple fixed scheme, with the three colors 120° apart.</td>
<td align="left"><p>Another simple fixed scheme, with the three colors 120° apart.</p></td>
</tr>
<tr><td><p><b>Tetradic (Double Complementary)</b></p></td></tr>
<tr><td align="center"><img src="images/cw-tetradic_20.png" title="The Color Wheel dialog" alt="The Color Wheel dialog"/><br />Angle = 20
<p><img src="images/cw-tetradic_40.png" title="The Color Wheel dialog" alt="The Color Wheel dialog"/><br />Angle = 40</td>
<td align="left">The base color is farthest to the right.<br />Here we have a single analogous color (second from the left), separated by our chosen angle, then corresponding complementary colors (first and third colors). Note that one complementary color pair is the first and fourth, and the other pair is the second and third.</td>
<td align="left"><p>The base color is farthest to the right.<br />Here we have a single analogous color (second from the left), separated by our chosen angle, then corresponding complementary colors (first and third colors). Note that one complementary color pair is the first and fourth, and the other pair is the second and third.</p></td>
</tr></table>
<h4>Making Use of These Schemes</h4>
<p>With so many schemes and variations in settings, obviously there is no automatic answer to choosing which is best for you. One way to learn is to look at advertisements, web pages, or other examples of pleasing design, and pay attention to their color schemes, noting which seem to work well, and which do not. There are good uses for similar colors and for contrasting colors, and most designs have each in various areas of the page.</p>
/trunk/Scribus/doc/en/config.html
3,6 → 3,9
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8"/>
<title>Configuration</title>
</head>
<style>
@import "manual.css";
</style>
<body>
<h2>Scribus Configuration</h2>
<p>A complex and feature-rich program like Scribus can't suit everybody's needs with a single configuration, especially if one considers that it also works on many different platforms. As Scribus grew over time, it was inevitable that users asked for more and more options to customize Scribus to suit their personal preferences/requirements. As a result, Scribus has become one of the most configurable DTP programs. Nevertheless, there will always be users for whom Scribus isn't configurable enough and others who don't want to be bothered with dozens of adjustable screws.</p>
10,4 → 13,4
 
 
</body>
</html>
</html>
/trunk/Scribus/doc/en/cli.html
3,33 → 3,36
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8">
<title>Scribus Command Line Reference</title>
</head>
<style>
@import "manual.css";
</style>
<body>
<h4>Scribus Command Line Reference</h4>
<p>Just like any other program, Scribus can be launched from the command line. Below you find the command line options for Linux/UNIX (including Mac OS X). On other operating systems the parameters may have to be used differently.</p>
 
<p>
<br />
<ul>
<li><code>-l, --lang xx</code><br>
<li><code>-l, --lang xx</code><br />
Overrides the system locale and runs Scribus in language <code>xx</code>. The language is specified with the same POSIX language codes that are used in the <code>LANG</code> and <code>LC_ALL</code> environment variables. For example, English can be selected with &lsquo;en&rsquo; (generic English), &lsquo;en_GB&rsquo; (British English), &lsquo;en_US&rsquo; (American english), etc. Similarly, reformed German can be selected with &lsquo;de&rsquo; or &lsquo;de_DE&rsquo;, traditional German with &lsquo;de_1901&rsquo;, and Swiss German with &lsquo;de_CH&rsquo;.</li>
<li><code>-la, --langs-available</code><br>
<li><code>-la, --langs-available</code><br />
Prints a list of languages for which user interface translations are available. To use that language run Scribus as <code>scribus -l xx</code> where <code>xx</code> is the short language code.</li>
<li><code>-v, --version</code><br>
<li><code>-v, --version</code><br />
Prints the Scribus version number and exits.</li>
<li><code>-f, --file</code><br>
<li><code>-f, --file</code><br />
Opens the specified file. It&rsquo;s possible to simply pass the file name as an unqualified argument instead of using this, though if the name begins with a dash (<code>-</code>) you will need to use <code>--</code>, e.g., <code>scribus -- -myfile.sla</code>.</li>
<li><code>-h, --help</code><br>
<li><code>-h, --help</code><br />
Prints a brief usage summary.</li>
<li><code>-fi, --font-info </code><br>
<li><code>-fi, --font-info </code><br />
Shows the font file listing as Scribus starts. This can be used for diagnosing missing glyphs within fonts or possibly broken font files.</li>
<li><code>-pi, --profile-info</code><br>
<li><code>-pi, --profile-info</code><br />
Shows the color profiles listing which Scribus can use. This can be used for diagnosing missing or broken color profiles.</li>
<li><code>-ns, --no-splash</code><br>
<li><code>-ns, --no-splash</code><br />
Suppresses display of the splash screen during Scribus start-up.</li>
<li><code>-nns, --never-splash</code><br>
<li><code>-nns, --never-splash</code><br />
Stops the showing of the splashscreen on startup. Writes an empty file called .neversplash in <code>~/.scribus</code>.</li>
<li><code>-sb, --swap-buttons</code><br>
<li><code>-sb, --swap-buttons</code><br />
Uses right to left dialog button ordering (e.g. Cancel/No/Yes instead of Yes/No/Cancel)</li>
<li><code>-u, --upgradecheck</code> <br>
<li><code>-u, --upgradecheck</code> <br />
Downloads a file from our scribus server indicating the latest available versions.</li>
</ul>
</body>
/trunk/Scribus/doc/en/index.html
10,6 → 10,9
</tr>
</table>
 
<style>
@import "manual.css";
</style>
<body>
<h2>Scribus &ndash; Open Source Desktop Publishing</h2>
 
/trunk/Scribus/doc/en/toolbox2.html
3,6 → 3,9
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8"/>
<title>PDF/PostScript Tools</title>
</head>
<style>
@import "manual.css";
</style>
<body>
<h2>PDF/PostScript Tools</h2>
<h3>PDF and PostScript Viewers</h3>
/trunk/Scribus/doc/en/moncal.html
3,6 → 3,9
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8"/>
<title>A Quick Start Guide to Monitor Profiling with Lprof</title>
</head>
<style>
@import "manual.css";
</style>
<body>
<h2>A Quick Start Guide to Monitor Profiling with Lprof</h2>
 
88,4 → 91,4
 
<!--<p><strong>Note:</strong> The latest beta profilers from littlecms adds new features, including support for profiling digital cameras and additional enhancements. However, it is a Windows only program. Fortunately, it includes the updated lcms 1.14 and it installs and runs fine under any recent version of Wine.</p>-->
</body>
</html>
</html>
/trunk/Scribus/doc/en/bugreport.html
3,6 → 3,9
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8"/>
<title>Filing a Bug Report</title>
</head>
<style>
@import "manual.css";
</style>
<body>
<h2>Filing a Bug report</h2>
<p>Successful software development is almost hopeless without testing, and that&rsquo;s true for Scribus as well, of course. Testing means using the software, especially development versions. Bugs, when discovered, need to be reported to let the developers know that something&rsquo;s wrong or at least seems to be wrong, so the problem can be fixed. Sometimes the fix may simply be a documentation update. Moreover, the developers need to know what kind of features users need. In such a case case, someone who is missing a feature or has a great idea, should let the Scribus Team know about it.</p>
44,8 → 47,8
</ul>
<br>
<h2>Filing a Bug Report</h2>
<br>To file a bug report, you have to click on the &ldquo;Report Issue&rdquo; link in your browser. You will be presented a page with lots of fields for entries:
<br>
<p>To file a bug report, you have to click on the &ldquo;Report Issue&rdquo; link in your browser. You will be presented a page with lots of fields for entries:
</p>
<table width="100%"><tr><td align="center"><img src="images/Mantis_new_report1.png"/></td></tr></table>
<br>
<ul><li><i>Categories</i>: Choose a category you think your report fits best. If you can&rsquo;t find an appropriate category, choose &ldquo;General.&rsquo;</li>
/trunk/Scribus/doc/en/topten.html
3,6 → 3,9
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8"/>
<title> Top <strike>Ten</strike>Twelve Hints - Tips and Tricks to make better documents faster in Scribus</title>
</head>
<style>
@import "manual.css";
</style>
<body>
<h2>Top <strike>Ten</strike> Twelve Hints - Tips and Tricks to make better documents faster in Scribus</h2>