Subversion Repositories Scribus

Compare Revisions

Ignore whitespace Rev 18508 → Rev 18509

/trunk/Scribus/doc/en/color8.html
9,7 → 9,7
<body>
<h2>Color Palettes in Scribus (6): Special Purpose Colors</h2>
<br>
<table border="1" cellpadding="8">
<table border="1" cellpadding="8" cellspacing="0">
<tbody>
<tr>
<td><p><b>Name</b></p></td>
/trunk/Scribus/doc/en/color5.html
10,7 → 10,7
<h2>Color Palettes in Scribus (3): Resene&reg; Colors</h2>
<p><a href="http://www.resene.co.nz">Resene Paints Limited</a> is a New Zealand-based color vendor, and as the name suggests, concentrates on coatings, paints and other colors for interior design, with its main markets in the Pacific region, especially Australia and New Zealand. The focus on areas other than printing doesn&rsquo;t mean that the color sets are useless in Scribus &ndash; quite the contrary. If they were, the Scribus Team wouldn&rsquo;t bother including them in the first place. First of all it should be noted that in many cases a close matching between corporate or organizational colors on different levels is required, from coatings to print products. Second, Resene, just like other color manufacturers, provides color charts, which allow for easily verifying colors with a printer. Third, there is the aesthetic facet of Resene palettes, as they consist of carefully chosen and lively colors that can add to the appeal of your layout.</p><br>
 
<table width="100%"><tr><td align="center"><img src="images/resene-pal.png" title="Resene&reg; Colors in the Scribus Color Manager" alt="Resene&reg; Colors in the Scribus Color Manager" /></td></tr></table><br/>
<p><img src="images/resene-pal.png" title="Resene&reg; Colors in the Scribus Color Manager" alt="Resene&reg; Colors in the Scribus Color Manager" hspace=20 /></p>
 
<h3>Specifics of Resene&reg; Palettes in Scribus</h3>
<h4>General</h4>
/trunk/Scribus/doc/en/color7a.html
17,10 → 17,9
<p><b>Galaxy Color Map&trade; Pro Main:</b> These CMYK colors correspond to the main swatch palette with the <a href="http://www.galaxygauge.com/p_col_cmp.html">Galaxy Color Map Pro</a> prediction and design tools. The colors increment by 20% for each CMYK component, offering a wider gamut than any other Galaxy color tool palettes. A pastel palette increases in 5% increments to offer fine variations for soft CMYK colors. The printed Color Map Pro reference is available for both coated and uncoated paper.<br><i>Number of colors: 1,287</i></p>
 
<p><b>Galaxy Color Directory:</b> This palette corresponds to the Galaxy Color Directory, which is included in Color Map Pro and Color Zil. It comprises more than seventy named colors, which are useful for client communication and for design projects where colors are specified by name rather than CMYK percentages. <br><i>Number of colors: 79</i></p>
<br>
<table width="100%"><tr><td align="center"><img src="images/galaxy_gauge.png" align="center" title="The Galaxy Color Directory palette in Scribus" alt="The Galaxy Color Directory palette in Scribus"/></td></tr></table>
<br>
 
<p><img src="images/galaxy_gauge.png" align="center" title="The Galaxy Color Directory palette in Scribus" alt="The Galaxy Color Directory palette in Scribus" hspace=20 /></p>
 
<p><b><a href="color7b.html">Galaxy Color Harmonizer&trade;</a>:</b> These CMYK colors correspond to the Galaxy Color Harmonizer wheel on the Galaxy Color Map Pro tool, which allows the user to easily create variations of pleasing color combinations using scientifically-designed and gamut-calibrated CMYK increments.<br><i>Number of colors: 167</i></p>
 
<p><b>Galaxy Neutrals and Rich Blacks:</b> These CMYK color values correspond to the Galaxy neutral and rich black color prediction tools on the Color Map Pro tool.<br><i>Number of colors: 48</i></p>
/trunk/Scribus/doc/en/color2.html
11,7 → 11,7
<h3>Changing the Default Color Palette</h3>
<p>To change the default color palette, make sure that no Scribus document is open. Then open the Color Manager (<i>Edit &gt; Colors</i>):</p>
 
<table width="100%"><tr><td align="center"><img src="images/colrs-mgt1.png" title="Scribus Color Manager" alt="Scribus Color Manager" /></td></tr></table><br/>
<p><img src="images/colrs-mgt1.png" title="Scribus Color Manager" alt="Scribus Color Manager" hspace=150 />
 
<p>In the dialog you can select a new default palette for <i>new</i> documents. Any change you make here will not affect existing documents, as the color palette in such a document has been <a href="color1.html">stored</a> in the document itself. Some of the color palettes shipped with Scribus have been created for special purposes, so before you select another default palette, you should learn something about the color sets from the descriptions provided in subsequent sections. In some cases, your printer or a client may insist on the use of certain colors.</p>
<blockquote>
20,9 → 20,9
<br />For proprietary spot colors, the color name will dictate what will be applied, so changing its appearance in Scribus will be another source of confusion and error.
</blockquote>
<p>What you might notice immediately when you open the dialog is that you can&rsquo;t edit any color in one of the palettes that are shipped with Scribus (most likely with a standard Linux installation). This is a feature, not a bug, as the very purpose of standardized colors is to work across documents, computers or platforms with identical colors, which in turn have unique color values and color names. Thus, all color palettes that have been installed to directories to which you have read-only access are &ldquo;locked&rdquo;, i.e. prevented from editing.</p>
<p>Sometimes, however, there are good reasons to edit a locked palette anyway, for example, if you need to reduce the number of colors in a palette for a certain project, i.e. if you need to create a &ldquo;project palette&rdquo;. In such a case you can click on the &ldquo;Save Color Set&rdquo; icon in the Color Manager. This will save the palette to your home directory and will add the copy to the list of available color sets. If you select the copy of the palette, you will notice that the editing options are now available. Be aware, though, that clicking &ldquo;OK&rdquo; will make all changes to the copy permanent!</p><br>
<table width="100%"><tr><td align="center"><img src="images/colrs-mgt2.png" title="Saving an editable copy of a locked palette" alt="Saving an editable copy of a locked palette" /></td></tr></table><br/>
 
<p>Sometimes, however, there are good reasons to edit a locked palette anyway, for example, if you need to reduce the number of colors in a palette for a certain project, i.e. if you need to create a &ldquo;project palette&rdquo;. In such a case you can click on the &ldquo;Save Color Set&rdquo; icon in the Color Manager. This will save the palette to your home directory and will add the copy to the list of available color sets. If you select the copy of the palette, you will notice that the editing options are now available. Be aware, though, that clicking &ldquo;OK&rdquo; will make all changes to the copy permanent!</p>
<p><img src="images/colrs-mgt2.png" title="Saving an editable copy of a locked palette" alt="Saving an editable copy of a locked palette" hspace=300 />
</p>
<h3>Installing or Importing New Color Palettes</h3>
<p>If you have bought or downloaded standardized palettes from a third party vendor and you can&rsquo;t acquire root/Administrator privileges on the system you are working on, you are advised to copy the palette files into a special folder in your home directory. If you have root/Administrator permissions, you can also copy the sets into a folder in the install directory. Please read the licensing conditions for the files you wish to install, as they may limit the number of permitted users per palette.</p>
<p>Here are the relevant paths for the supported operating systems:</p>
/trunk/Scribus/doc/en/color7.html
13,7 → 13,7
 
<p>Until now, GiveLife Color System&reg; has developed two numerical color systems, one in RGB and one in CMYK. Scribus is the first graphics program which is being shipped by default with the GiveLife Color System&reg; color palettes.</p>
 
<table width="100%"><tr><td align="center"><img src="images/givelife1.png" title="The GiveLife Color&reg; System CMYK palette in the Scribus Color Manager" alt="The GiveLife Color&reg; System CMYK palette in the Scribus Color Manager"/></td></tr></table><br>
<p><img src="images/givelife1.png" title="The GiveLife Color&reg; System CMYK palette in the Scribus Color Manager" alt="The GiveLife Color&reg; System CMYK palette in the Scribus Color Manager" hspace=100 /></p>
 
<h3>The palette &ldquo;GiveLife Color System CMYK&rdquo;</h3>
<p>This palette consists of 2265 CMYK colors, each of which has a five-digit numerical code. The system has been developed for use in print-related projects. The company offers a printed color reference for this palette on its <a href="http://www.givelifecolorsystem.com">website</a>. This <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/givelifecolorsystem/">&ldquo;Color Guide Book&rdquo;</a> has been created using the ICC profile FOGRA 39 (ISO 12647-2:2004).</p>
/trunk/Scribus/doc/en/color7c.html
16,7 → 16,7
<li>Decide on the color volume. Dark tones &ldquo;speak&rdquo; loudly, midtones are conversational, light tones whisper.</li>
<li>Choose one of the schemes below for complement and accent colors.</li>
</ol>
<table>
<table cellpadding="8" cellspacing="0">
<tbody>
<tr>
<td><img src="images/GG_CE_ex1.png" align="center"/></td>
53,7 → 53,7
<br>
<h3>Galaxy Emotional Color Table</h3>
<br>
<table>
<table cellpadding="8" cellspacing="0">
<tbody>
<tr>
<td><img src="images/GG_CE1.png" align="center"/></td>
/trunk/Scribus/doc/en/manual.css
7,4 → 7,5
li {font-family:dejavu sans,sans-serif; font-size:0.8em;}
code {font-size:1.1em;}
dl {font-family:dejavu sans, sans-serif; font-size:1em;}
pre {font-size:0.9em;}
pre {font-size:0.9em;}
table, td {border:1px solid gray;}
/trunk/Scribus/doc/en/color4.html
10,7 → 10,7
<h2>Color Palettes in Scribus (2): National/Government Standards</h2>
<p>In some countries the national standard bodies or governments themselves created standardized color sets, i.e., color standards that bidders/tenderers in calls for tenders must comply with. While some of these standards have niche applications, like military vessels or cables, others are considered to be &ldquo;general purpose&rdquo; color standards. The Scribus Team has collected and will continue to collect as many of those standards as possible, at least if they aren&rsquo;t defined as a subset of other color &ldquo;standards&rdquo; like Pantone&reg;. We hope that this feature will facilitate the use of Scribus in government agencies.</p>
<p>To use one of the standards reliably, you are advised to contact the respective government agency or standards organization, as they may be selling reference materials like color fans or color chips. In many cases, the reference materials can also be bought from vendors of printing accessories. <b>The colors in some Scribus palettes are only approximations!</b></p><br>
<table border="1" cellpadding="8">
<table border="1" cellpadding="8" cellspacing="0">
<tbody>
<tr>
<td><p><b>Name</b></p></td>
/trunk/Scribus/doc/en/color1.html
13,8 → 13,7
<h3>Why Color Sets?</h3>
<p>The answer to the question in the headline is closely related to the answer to a more basic question, namely: &ldquo;What is a color?&rdquo; The truth is, there is no simple answer to that question, as a &ldquo;color&rdquo; can be described in hundreds of ways, for example as a combination of wavelengths, a combination of color values within a certain &ldquo;color model&rdquo;, as a category in a framework based on aesthetical rules etc. As a result, many different so-called &ldquo;color models&rdquo; have been developed over the course of time, many of which have become part of a discipline called &ldquo;color science,&rdquo; a science that is itself a &ldquo;meta-science,&rdquo; as it requires input from many different disciplines, including physics, neuro-science, biology, mathematics, engineering, and even art, artisanry or literature. &ldquo;Color&rdquo; is actually one of a few cases, in which artists like Johann Wolfgang von Goethe or Albert Henry Munsell contributed significantly to scientific progress.</p>
<p>Users of graphics-related programs like Scribus shouldn&rsquo;t be required to learn the ins and outs of color science, although some theoretical knowledge doesn&rsquo;t hurt. On a more basic level, however, some awareness of the issues mentioned above certainly helps a lot when working with colors, and the cartoon below may be a first step to understand what it&rsquo;s all about:</p>
 
<table width="100%"><tr><td align="center"><img src="images/colrs-caricature.png" title="Color Names &ndash; Courtesy of http://www.thedoghousediaries.com" alt="Color Names &ndash; Courtesy of http://www.thedoghousediaries.com" /></td></tr></table><br>
<p><img src="images/colrs-caricature.png" title="Color Names &ndash; Courtesy of http://www.thedoghousediaries.com" alt="Color Names &ndash; Courtesy of http://www.thedoghousediaries.com" hspace=20 /></p>
<p>As is often true with good cartoons, there is some relevant truth behind it, in that there are different levels of differentiating and categorizing colors, which are often highly subjective. Imagine two persons, one in the &ldquo;Girls&rdquo; column, the other in the &ldquo;Boys&rdquo; column, talking on the phone about a color choice for a project &ndash; it will be virtually impossible, since both the (subjective) color names and the color perception are quite different. Thus, pre-defined color sets are actually a way to <b><i>communicate</i></b> about colors without referring to either a subjective color model or sophisticated color science, and using meaningful names for colors within a given color set can facilitate communication about colors even further.</p>
<p>Creating color sets also helps vendors or projects to define a limited set of colors that are allowed for use, which helps to maintain visual uniformity across publications</p>
<p>As a practical matter, the colors available in a color palette or colors you create yourself (and thus add to an existing palette) are the only ones that can be used as text, fill, line or gradient colors.</p>
23,7 → 22,7
<p>Scribus is being shipped with a huge collection of more than 150 useful color sets, also called “palettes” or (somehow misleading) “swatches.” These palettes serve different purposes, all of which will be described in <a href="color3.html">separate documents</a>. There are palettes of different sizes available, ranging from &ldquo;Scribus Basic&rdquo;, a collection of primary RGB and CMYK colors to, for instance, &ldquo;X11,&rdquo; which includes a huge number of (RGB) Colors.</p>
<p>Color palettes in Scribus can contain four different types of colors, each of which uses a different visual indicator in Scribus color dialogs:</p>
 
<table border="0">
<table width="80%" align="center" border="0" cellpadding="8" cellspacing="0">
<col width=2*>
<col width=2*>
<col width=auto>
30,30 → 29,23
<tbody>
<tr valign=top>
<td><img src="images/rgb.png"></td>
<td> </td>
<td><p><b>RGB Colors</b>: These colours are defined in the RGB color model. Every color is described by the three primary colors red, green and blue.</p></td>
</tr>
<tr valign=top>
<td><img src="images/cmyk.png" align="top"></td>
<td></td>
<td><p><b>CMYK Colors</b>: These colors are defined in the CMYK color model. Every color is described by the four ink colors used in color printing: Cyan, Magenta, Yellow and Key (=Black).</p></td>
</tr>
<tr valign=top>
<td><img src="images/spot.png"></td>
<td></td>
<td><p><b>Spot Colors</b>: These are also referred to as &ldquo;named colors,&rdquo; but since other (RGB/CMYK) colors can also have a name, the term &ldquo;spot color&rdquo; is to be preferred for unambiguousness. While a spot color can be either defined in the RGB or CMYK color model, its main purpose is to be stored with its <i>name</i> in a PDF or PostScript file (hence the term “named color”). The name refers to a real world color reference, like a printed color fan, and a printing company can mix or buy a special ink, which will match exactly the color as specified by the reference. Each spot color requires a separate printing plate, which is why you should use spot colors carefully, because their use makes a printing process more expensive. Typical use cases for spot colors would be very specific hues in corporate logos. The red dot beside a color model icon (RGB or CMYK) indicates that the respective color is a spot color.</p></td>
</tr>
<tr valign=top>
<td><img src="images/register.png"></td>
<td></td>
<td><p><b>Registration Color</b>: This is a special case of a &ldquo;color,&rdquo; which is used for registration marks. The latter are used by printers to determine whether a four-color print run has been successful. While displayed as a CMYK color, it will actually consist of as many colors as there are color separations, one or each printing plate. Each palette can only have one registration color, which is indicated by a &ldquo;bull&rsquo;s eye&rdquo; icon.</p></td>
<td></td>
</tr>
<tr valign=top>
<td><img src="images/alert.png"></td>
<td></td>
<td><p>If you are working with activated <a href="cms.html">color management</a>, some or even all colors in a palette may be &ldquo;out of gamut,&rdquo; i.e., depending on a selected ICC profile, a color can&rsquo;t be &ldquo;translated&rdquo; from one color model into another, and a color shift can occur. In such a case you will see a warning sign placed beside the color in the list.</p></td>
<td></td>
</tr>
</tbody>
</table>
/trunk/Scribus/doc/en/color6.html
22,9 → 22,9
<p>dtp studio has measured many more color systems and created palette sets, all of which can be <a href="http://palettes.de/english/index.htm" target="_blank">bought online</a> separately. For the future, the company has plans to support Scribus directly, but for the time being you can safely order EPS palettes and install them as &ldquo;system&rdquo; or &ldquo;locked palettes&rdquo; according to the <a href="color2.html">general instructions</a>.</p>
<p>If you need a physical color reference for printing purposes, you can also acquire a printed <a href="http://www.satzinform.de" target="_blank">CMYK Book</a> that covers the whole range of color systems measured by dtp studio, not just the small selection included in Scribus and described below.</p><br>
 
<table width="100%"><tr><td align="center"><img src="images/dtp-studio.png" title="The HKS K equivalent J+S K for newspaper print from dtp studio in the Scribus Color Manager" alt="The HKS K equivalent J+S K for newspaper print from dtp studio in the Scribus Color Manager" /></td></tr></table><br>
<p><img src="images/dtp-studio.png" title="The HKS K equivalent J+S K for newspaper print from dtp studio in the Scribus Color Manager" alt="The HKS K equivalent J+S K for newspaper print from dtp studio in the Scribus Color Manager" hspace=25 /></p>
<h2>dtp studio Palettes Shipped with Scribus</h2>
<table border="1" cellpadding="8">
<table border="1" cellpadding="8" cellspacing="0">
<tbody>
<tr>
<td><p><b>Name</b></p></td>
/trunk/Scribus/doc/en/color7b.html
10,16 → 10,16
<h2>Color Palettes in Scribus (6a): Galaxy Color Harmonizer</h2>
<p>In addition to Scribus&rsquo;s built-in <a href="colorwheel.html">Color Wheel</a>, you can also use the <a href="color7a.html">Galaxy</a> Color Harmonizer to create color harmonies. The major difference between the Scribus Color Wheel and the Galaxy Color Harmonizer is the color model: RYB (Scribus) vs. CMYK (Galaxy).</p>
<p>The Color Harmonizer doesn&rsquo;t work in software (yet), but is nevertheless easy to use. The first step is to <a href="color2.html">change the default palette</a> to &ldquo;Galaxy Color Harmonizer&rdquo; or to import the palette into an existing file:</p>
<br>
<table width="100%"><tr><td align="center"><img src="images/galaxy_harmonizer1.png" align="center" title="Selecting the Color Harmonizer palette" alt="Selecting the Color Harmonizer palette"/></td></tr></table>
<br>
 
<p><img src="images/galaxy_harmonizer1.png" align="center" title="Selecting the Color Harmonizer palette" alt="Selecting the Color Harmonizer palette" hspace=100 /></p>
 
<p>To create color harmonies, the low-resolution color wheel below may be sufficient, but if you need a reference of better quality, you can visit the <a href="http://www.galaxygauge.com/">Galaxy Gauge</a> website, where you can either download a high-resolution image of the color wheel or order a printed <a href="http://www.galaxygauge.com/p_col_cmp.html">Galaxy Color Map Pro</a> reference, which includes the color wheel.</p>
<br>
<table width="100%"><tr><td align="center"><img src="images/galaxy_harmonizer2.png" align="center" title="The Galaxy Color Harmonizer" alt="The Galaxy Color Harmonizer"/></td></tr></table>
<br>
 
<p><img src="images/galaxy_harmonizer2.png" align="center" title="The Galaxy Color Harmonizer" alt="The Galaxy Color Harmonizer" hspace=50 /></p>
 
<h3>How to Find Pleasing Color Combinations</h3>
<p>There are several ways to find attractive color combinations.</p>
<table>
<table cellpadding="8" cellspacing="0">
<tbody>
<tr>
<td><p><b>Choose two colors within two or three sectors.</b><br>Make sure colors have enough contrast to avoid blending with each other.<br>Example: C100, C100/M50</p></td>
/trunk/Scribus/doc/en/color3.html
10,7 → 10,7
<h2>Color Palettes in Scribus (1): Open Source Palettes</h2>
<p>Note that all color palettes described here and in subsequent sections include three basic colors: 100% CMYK Black (C:&nbsp;100, M:&nbsp;100, Y:&nbsp;100, K:&nbsp;100), 100% CMYK White (C:&nbsp;0, M:&nbsp;0, Y:&nbsp;0, K:&nbsp;0), and the <a href="color1.html">Registration Color</a>. These will not be counted as separate colors in the tables.</p>
<p>It is also important to note that no physical reference (color fan, color chips) exists for the colors in the palettes listed on this page so verification of color correctness is impossible.</p><br>
<table border="1" cellpadding="8">
<table border="1" cellpadding="8" cellspacing="0">
<tbody>
<tr valign=top>
<td><p><b>Name</b></p></td>