Subversion Repositories Scribus

Compare Revisions

Ignore whitespace Rev 2322 → Rev 2323

/trunk/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/toolbox1.html
7,7 → 7,7
 
<p> Moreover, while PDF is a published standard, Adobe invented PostScript on which PDF is based and has a commercial incentive to promote PDF on all platforms.</p>
<h3>Hints for Scribus users:</h3>
<p><strong>We highly recommend upgrading to the latest Adobe Reader 7. </strong>Simply put, there is nothing else more capable of rendering PDF correctly. Whatever your objections were to older versions (and there were some substantial ones), this latest version 7 amelorates the vast majority of them. It is far more stable, bug free and now has a modern look and feel. <strong>Any PDF rendering issues with Scribus exported PDF in other viewers should be cross-checked with Reader 7 before reporting bugs to us. </strong>We are aware of one color mismatches with RGB images and transparency in PDf 1.4. Yes, this has been duly reported as a bug to Adobe too. </p>
<p><strong>We highly recommend upgrading to the latest Adobe Reader 7. </strong>Simply put, there is nothing else more capable of rendering PDF correctly. Whatever your objections were to older versions (and there were some substantial ones), this latest version 7 amelorates the vast majority of them. It is far more stable, bug free and now has a modern look and feel. <strong>Any PDF rendering issues with Scribus exported PDF in other viewers should be cross-checked with Reader 7 before reporting bugs to us. </strong>We are aware of one color mismatch with RGB images and transparency in PDF 1.4. Yes, this has been duly reported as a bug to Adobe too. </p>
 
<h3>Tweaking the Viewer Preferences</h3>
 
40,9 → 40,7
<table width="100%"><tr><td align="center"><img alt="Acrobat Reader Security Panel" src="images/acrosec.png" /></td></tr></table>
<p><strong>Annotations</strong> are non-printing notes which Scribus can optionally embed within a PDF. This is really simple. Create a text frame. Then add your notes and right click, select PDF Options and check "Is PDF Annotation".</p>
<p>For other "hidden" features, read through the online help, which is actually a PDF. Beginning with page 10, there are a number of less well known features, including the console command line options. The command line options are specific to Linux/Unix and include some neat options to export PDF into Postscript. There also hints on settings specific to Acrobat Reader in <code>~/Xdefaults</code>.</p>
<p><strong>Advanced Settings</strong> - Unfortunately, Adobe did not enable a graphical UI choice for enabling/disabling local fonts. What this means Acrobat will use locally installed fonts which are named in the PDF, if it can find them in your font path. In your home directory is a .acrobat/prefs file. Make a backup copy then open this file in a text editor. Almost at the end you are looking for this line:</p>
<blockquote><table width="100%" border="1" bgcolor="#eeeeee"><tr><td border="0"><small>
<pre>/avpUseLocalFonts [/b true]</pre>
</small></td></tr></table></blockquote>
<p>I recommend you set this to false for use with Scribus. Why? As is often the case PDFs you create in Scribus will be sent to other users who are not running on Linux. What you will want in this case is realistic view without your fonts. Thus, the only reliable way of ensuring your doc will view properly anywhere is to embed the fonts. You can subset them in the font preferences panel to save file size. This particularly important when using the Ghostscript fonts, like the Nimbus family. Acrobat Reader does a poor job of simulating them with its own built-in multi-master fonts.</p>
<p><strong>Advanced Settings</strong> - Fortunately, Adobe enabled a graphical UI choice for enabling/disabling local fonts. <strong>Document > Use Local Fonts </strong><br /><br />What this choice does is enable Acrobat to use locally installed fonts which are named in the PDF, if it can find them in your font path.</p>
 
<p>I recommend you set this to disable for use with Scribus. Why? As is often the case, PDFs you create in Scribus will be sent to other users who are not running on Linux. What you will want in this case is realistic view <strong>without</strong> your fonts. Thus, the only reliable way of ensuring your doc will view properly anywhere is to embed the fonts. You can subset them in the font preferences panel to save file size. This particularly important when using the Ghostscript fonts, like the Nimbus family. Acrobat Reader does a poor job of simulating them with its own built-in multi-master fonts.</p>
</qt>