Subversion Repositories Scribus

Compare Revisions

Ignore whitespace Rev 9600 → Rev 9601

/branches/Version133x/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/toolbox14.html
1,14 → 1,15
<qt>
<title>Lprof</title>
<h2>Lprof</h2>
<p>For those running BSD, Linux or Unix Lprof is an essential tool for making color management work reliably in Scribus. Why so ? </p>
<title>LProf</title>
<h2>LProf</h2>
<p>For those running BSD, Linux or Unix <a href="http://lprof.sourceforge.net/">LProf</a> is an essential tool for making color management work reliably in Scribus. Why so?</p>
 
<h3>Lprof is like visting your eye doctor.</h3>
<h3>LProf is like visiting your eye doctor.</h3>
 
<p>Lprof is the only graphical tool for creating ICC monitor profiles. It also works on Windows and soon, MacOSX. Very simply Lprof is a tool for creating an ICC profile of your monitor which helps make color managed previews more accurate. Think of a monitor profile as a set of glasses which magically transform your eyes to see with perfect color balance. Within Scribus a correct monitor profile can make a big difference in viewing accurately how your print or PDF will appear on a postscript printer or when printed commercially. Without an individual profile of your monitor - no two monitors are alike - you have no real assurance the color transforms will be anywhere near close when you are for example sending PDFs to a printer. </p>
<p>Lprof has a simple step by step method to walk you through creating a profile of your monitor which then can be used in Scribus. You should take the 5 minutes it takes to create a profile and then add this to your Scribus Color management preferences. Lprof can also create profiles for your scanner or digital camera. A look at the Lprof documentation will give you a more detailed understanding of its capabilities. </p>
<p>LProf is the only graphical tool for creating ICC monitor profiles. It also works on Windows and, soon, Mac&nbsp;OS&nbsp;X. Very simply LProf is a tool for creating an ICC profile of your monitor which helps make color managed previews more accurate. Think of a monitor profile as a set of glasses which magically transform your eyes to see with perfect color balance. Within Scribus a correct monitor profile can make a big difference in viewing accurately how your print or PDF will appear on a postscript printer or when printed commercially. Without an individual profile of your monitor&nbsp;&mdash; no two monitors are alike&nbsp;&mdash; you have no real assurance the color transforms will be anywhere near close, when you are for example sending PDFs to a printer. </p>
<p>LProf has a simple step by step method to walk you through creating a profile of your monitor which then can be used in Scribus. You should take the 5 minutes it takes to create a profile and then add this to your Scribus Color management preferences. LProf can also create profiles for your scanner or digital camera. A look at the LProf's documentation will give you a more detailed understanding of its capabilities. </p>
<p>Currently available released version (0.11.4) doesn't allow using calibration devices yet. Adding this feature is a work in progress and quite successful one: with the next version of LProf you will be able to use devices like X-Rite DTP94, EyeOne Display 2 and EyeOne Display LT to measure your display on both Windows and Linux.</p>
 
<p>On MacOSX, you can also use the native built in ColorSync applet to create a monitor profile. On Windows, if you have installed Photoshop, Indesign or Illustrator, Adoboe Gamma performs a similar, if more simplistic method of creating a monitor profile.</p>
<p>On Mac&nbsp;OS&nbsp;X, you can also use the native built in ColorSync applet to create a monitor profile. On Windows, if you have installed Photoshop, Indesign or Illustrator, Adobe Gamma performs a similar, if more simplistic method of creating a monitor profile.</p>
 
<table width="100%"><tr><td align="center"><img src="images/lprof.png" alt="Lprof creating a profile." /></td></tr></table>
<table width="100%"><tr><td align="center"><img src="images/lprof.png" alt="LProf creating a profile." /></td></tr></table>
</qt>
/branches/Version133x/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/toolbox11.html
12,6 → 12,8
 
<p><strong>Pstoedit</strong> - is slightly different in that it specializes in the conversion of PostScript in to vector using Ghostscript. It works as a plug-in for GSview. </p>
 
<p><strong>Inkscape</strong> relies on potrace to trace bitmaps inserted into a document. It allows creating both black and white and color traces and provides preview. Most recent development code of Inkscape has a bucket fill tool which basically allows versatile interactive tracing of closed areas. This feature will be part of 0.46 release.</p>
 
<p>The thing to keep in mind when using these is there are many options when performing traces and some experimentation is sometimes required, especially more complex artwork. Don't expect perfection. The first time, it took me a bit of experimenting when I converted the Scribus logo from an EPS with a bitmap embedded into pure SVG, which then imported in Scribus.</p>
 
</qt>
/branches/Version133x/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/toolbox4.html
7,11 → 7,11
<p>However, setting up GIMP for print work with Scribus requires some adjustments to the defaults as shown below: </p>
 
<ul>
<li>Some distributions do not install the "Separate" plug-in which enables you to export CMYK TIFF and duotones. If you want to use duotones, it is recommended.</li>
<li>Make sure you have the latest 2.x.x stable version. There were some important bug fixes made after 2.0.1.</li>
<li>GIMP now can work with CMYK colors. While the color model internally is still RGB plus alpha channels, you can use CMYK measurements and CMYK color definitions. To supplement this, there is a third party plug-in called Separate, which can export CMYK TIFF, using a neat trick with alpha layers. The separate plug-in can also embed ICC profiles into the exported TIFF.</li>
<li>Make sure you have the latest 2.2.x stable version. There were some important bug fixes made after 2.2.0.</li>
<li>GIMP now can work with CMYK colors. While the color model internally is still RGB plus alpha channels, you can use CMYK measurements and CMYK color definitions. To supplement this, there is a third party plug-in called <a href="http://cue.yellowmagic.info/softwares/separate.html">separate+</a>, which can export CMYK TIFF, using a neat trick with alpha layers. The separate+ plug-in can also embed ICC profiles into the exported TIFF and create duotone TIFF.</li>
<li>One of the really appreciated improvements is the text handling. GIMP 2.x uses <code>fontconfig</code>, so finding the fonts on your system is much less of an issue. Text can be kept in a separate layer to ease editing and correcting. In the 1.2.x versions certain type of handling were difficult, but there is little to complain about now. It is a pleasure to use the new text controls. In addition, there is also a separate freetype plug-in for GIMP, which allows you to manipulate type in the same means Scribus and Inkscape do. Recommended. You can find this on the ftp.gimp.org site.</li>
<li>The way that pixels are adjusted (interpolated) in filters and effects are applied use Linear as the default. This is a good compromise for speed vs. accuracy. <b>Cubic should almost always be the default for print work</b>, but do expect many operations, (re-scaling, filter application) to run slower. Using Cubic can make sometimes a dramatic difference in the perceived print quality of an image.</li>
<li>Most recent development version of GIMP (to-be-2.3.17) is going to export all paths as clipping paths in TIFF files. If you need this feature and you are really brave to run unstable code, you could give it a try.</li>
<li>The way that pixels are adjusted (interpolated) in filters and effects are applied use Linear as the default. This is a good compromise for speed vs. accuracy. <b>Cubic should almost always be the default for print work</b>, but do expect many operations, (re-scaling, filter application) to run slower. Using Cubic can make sometimes a dramatic difference in the perceived print quality of an image, so make sure GIMP is using it by default.</li>
</ul>
 
<table width="100%"><tr><td align="center"><img alt="Cubic Interpolation" src="images/gimpoptions1.png" /></td></tr></table>
20,7 → 20,7
 
<table width="100%"><tr><td align="center"><img alt="DPI Defaults" src="images/gimpoptions3.png" /></td></tr></table>
 
<p>The other notable addition is the beginnings of some very basic color managed "soft proofs" of your images. This is available via littlecms also used by Scribus. Accessing the controls is simple via View > Display Filters. This can be considered experimental at the moment, but expect a more complete color managed view in GIMP 2.4. The most recent development 2.3.x versions of GIMP show dramatically more color management capabilities.</p>
<p>The other notable addition is the beginnings of some very basic color managed "soft proofs" of your images. This is available via LittleCMS also used by Scribus. Accessing the controls is simple via View > Display Filters. This can be considered experimental at the moment, but expect a more complete color managed view in GIMP 2.4. The most recent development 2.3.x versions of GIMP show dramatically more color management capabilities.</p>
 
<table width="100%"><tr><td align="center"><img alt="Display Filter" src="images/gimpoptions2.png" /></td></tr></table>
 
/branches/Version133x/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/cms2.html
11,7 → 11,7
 
<p>Each of the "working" spaces are based on certain settings for your monitor. Gamma and color temperature of your monitor should match the specs of the working space. For example, Adobe&#174; RGB and Bruce RGB specifies 6500k and 2.2 gamma, quite common for Intel based PC monitors and are the recommended defaults for users who are editing color critical images.</p>
 
<p>Targeting the CMYK device (the printer) properly using a profile, which is appropriate for the paper and device. Printer profiles are highly dependent on the media chosen. Newsprint and un-coated stocks are grayer in appearance, so these profiles will have a narrower "gamut" or color range. They do not to produce the super vivid colors and saturation of coated stock or glossy photographic papers. A single printer could have a half dozen or more profiles, based just on differences in the paper color and ink absorbency.</p>
<p>Targeting the CMYK device (the printer) properly using a profile, which is appropriate for the paper and device. Printer profiles are highly dependent on the media chosen. Newsprint and un-coated stocks are grayer in appearance, so these profiles will have a narrower "gamut" or color range. They do not to produce the super vivid colors and saturation of coated stock or glossy photographic papers. A single printer could easily have a dozen or more profiles, based just on differences in the paper color and ink absorbency.</p>
 
<p><strong>So, how do I get profiles which are meaningful for my hardware.?</strong></p>
 
19,7 → 19,7
 
<p><strong>Linux Color Tools</strong></p>
 
<p><strong>Monitor Gamma</strong> - Gamma, to greatly oversimplify, is a number which represents the brightness of neutrals or grays. Having Gamma accurately setup is an essential first step in getting good color balance <strong>before</strong> trying to creating an accurate profile. The monitor profiler from lprof is well designed to help you set this correctly.</p>
<p><strong>Monitor Gamma</strong> - Gamma, to greatly oversimplify, is a number which represents the brightness of neutrals or grays. Having Gamma accurately setup is an essential first step in getting good color balance <strong>before</strong> trying to creating an accurate profile. The monitor profiler from LProf is well designed to help you set this correctly.</p>
 
<p>The next level in accuracy is a custom generated profile created with profiling software, like the ones in the the littlecms profile constructor set. <a href="moncal.html">See the instructions for profiling your monitor for details.</a> It was interesting to see how similar the profile was to one created with professional pre-press color calibration software and a hardware tool under Windows 2000.</p>
 
35,7 → 35,7
(red green blue) or <strong>CMYK</strong> (cyan,magenta,yellow and K for black - these colors represent the four inks used in process printing or in color ink jets). In this case, we are using some basic RGB colors, which will be later "soft proofed" in the CMYK color space of the printer, which will be a commercial process known as US <!--<a href="./lcms/swop.html">-->SWOP<!--</a>--> on coated paper to ensure rich and vibrant colors.</p>
 
<p>It is handy to give your device profiles some sort of short hand way of naming. For example the D226500mon.icm monitor profile is a custom profile created with Qmonitorprofiler with 2.2 gamma and 6500k temperature. The D is for daylight. Ambient light also affects your perception of color, sometimes radically with certain types of artificial light. The Sony 17 name comes from the description when the monitor profile was created with Qmonitorprofiler from littlecms.</p>
<p>It is handy to give your device profiles some sort of short hand way of naming. For example the D226500mon.icm monitor profile is a custom profile created with <A href="http://lprof.sf.net" id="LProf" onclick="LProf">LProf</A> with 2.2 gamma and 6500k temperature. The D is for daylight. Ambient light also affects your perception of color, sometimes radically with certain types of artificial light. The Sony 17 name comes from the description when the monitor profile was created with Qmonitorprofiler from littlecms.</p>
 
<p><strong>Activate Color Management</strong> enables color management globally within the document. Scribus will remember the settings from file to file. Note: Saving and closing the file with color management on will slow them on reopening, as Scribus must not only open the files but the littlecms must reading and perform the corrections between the profiles. Color conversions make multiple floating point calculations for each color, so be patient. littlecms has to be extremely stable so far, with only a couple of small bugs for profile handling. There is a second check mark to simulate the printer on the screen. This tells Scribus and littlecms to do an on the fly conversion from the image color space to your monitor profile to simulate your chosen printer's profile. The check mark for <strong>Mark colors out of Gamut</strong> will show colors are warnings and might not not print accurately, based on the printer profile you have chosen. Typically, when colors are shown out of gamut, they will print darker, lighter or have a color shift when printing. The last option, <strong>Use Black Point Compensation</strong>, is a way to help rendering shadows within color pictures. Experimentation is needed to see if it improves your pictures.</p>
 
/branches/Version133x/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/toolbox9.html
5,11 → 5,11
 
<p>That said, Inkscape is rapidly becoming the leading OSS SVG vector drawing or &#034;illustration&#034; tool. The Inkscape Team has made a lot of effort to faithfully adhere to the W3C SVG specs. The most recent version has made a lot of progress and has new import/export options. Some more experimental than others. </p>
 
<p>In its favor: A very friendly user interface, with extensive tool tips and a couple of really well done short tutorials on vector drawings. Almost every function can be handled by keyboard short cuts (the list of shortcuts is almost 10 pages). Like Scribus, the Inkscape Team is quick with bug fixes and is very open minded about feature requests and enhancements.</p>
<p>In its favor: A very friendly user interface, with extensive tool tips and a couple of really well done short tutorials on vector drawings. Almost every function can be handled by keyboard shortcuts (the list of shortcuts is almost 10 pages). Like Scribus, the Inkscape Team is quick with bug fixes and is very open minded about feature requests and enhancements.</p>
 
<p>The best part of Inkscape though it is its fidelity to SVG specs. No, it is not perfect, no application is, however. Inkscape SVG seems to work well with other SVG applications better than most, even some expensive commercial ones. </p>
 
<p>For the most part, Inkscape SVG artwork will import into Scribus easily. There are some SVG features which are not yet supported by Scribus (patterns), however 99% of the time, It Just Works TM. If a file does not seem to import correctly into Scribus, try saving as &#034;Plain SVG&#034; within Inkscape. One other hint for working with Inkscape SVG is the SVG model for working with text is far different than the PDF/PostScript model. (One of the few weak spots in the spec in my opinion.) Save text input and text effects for Scribus. Scribus does a very good job of offering you a multitude of text effects and it will output them faithfully. Scribus uses the freetype2 libraries and this gives you a wide range of effects.</p>
<p>For the most part, Inkscape SVG artwork will import into Scribus easily. There are some SVG features which are not yet supported by Scribus (patterns, Gaussian blur), however 99% of the time, It Just Works&trade;. If a file does not seem to import correctly into Scribus, try saving as &#034;Plain SVG&#034; within Inkscape. One other hint for working with Inkscape SVG is the SVG model for working with text is far different than the PDF/PostScript model. (One of the few weak spots in the spec in my opinion.) Save text input and text effects for Scribus. Scribus does a very good job of offering you a multitude of text effects and it will output them faithfully. Scribus uses the freetype2 libraries and this gives you a wide range of effects.</p>
 
<p>That does not mean Inkscape does it wrong. Only that the way it is done in SVG and within a PostScript oriented application are sometimes very different and difficult to translate from one to the other. Actually, Inkscape does an excellent job of support for SVG font features including kerning and other advanced features.</p>
</qt>
/branches/Version133x/Scribus/scribus/about.cpp
224,6 → 224,9
"<tr><td><b>" + langmgr.getLangFromAbbrev("ca").utf8() + "</b></td><td> </td></tr>" +
"<tr><td>Xavier Sala Pujolar</td><td>utrescu@xaviersala.net</td></tr>" +
"<tr><td> </td><td> </td></tr>" +
"<tr><td><b>" + langmgr.getLangFromAbbrev("zh_TW").utf8() + "</b></td><td> </td></tr>" +
"<tr><td>Gilbert Su</td><td>gilbert_su@yahoo.com.tw</td></tr>" +
"<tr><td> </td><td> </td></tr>" +
"<tr><td><b>" + langmgr.getLangFromAbbrev("cs").utf8() + "</b></td><td></td></tr>" +
"<tr><td>Petr Vaněk</td><td>petr@yarpen.cz</td></tr>" +
"<tr><td> </td><td> </td></tr>" +
358,9 → 361,7
"<tr><td><b>" + langmgr.getLangFromAbbrev("tr").utf8() + "</b></td><td> </td></tr>" +
"<tr><td>Erkan Kaplan</td><td>Selamsana@uni.de</td></tr>" +
"<tr><td> </td><td> </td></tr>" +
"<tr><td><b>" + langmgr.getLangFromAbbrev("zh_TW").utf8() + "</b></td><td> </td></tr>" +
"<tr><td>Gilbert Su</td><td>gilbert_su@yahoo.com.tw</td></tr>" +
"<tr><td> </td><td> </td></tr>" +
"<tr><td><b>" + langmgr.getLangFromAbbrev("uk").utf8() + "</b></td><td> </td></tr>" +
"<tr><td>Sergiy Kudryk</td><td>kudryk@yahoo.com</td></tr>" +
"<tr><td> </td><td> </td></tr>" +
/branches/Version133x/Scribus/scribus.lsm
1,6 → 1,6
Begin4
Title: Scribus
Version: 1.3.3.9
Version: 1.3.3.10
Entered-date: 2003-10-01
Description: Scribus is a Page Layout Program for Linux published under the GNU GPL.
Keywords: desktop publishing, page layout, PDF, text processing, graphics, postscript, SVG, EPS