Subversion Repositories Scribus

Compare Revisions

Ignore whitespace Rev 10877 → Rev 10876

/branches/Version133x/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/cups.html
1,9 → 1,9
<qt>
<title>Linux Printing with CUPS, Gutenprint and Scribus</title>
<h2>Linux Printing with CUPS, Gutenprint and Scribus</h2>
<p>CUPS, Gutenprint and Scribus together can give very good print output on Linux, provided it is installed and configured properly. </p>
<p>First, make sure you have the the correct CUPS development libraries installed before compiling Scribus. On Redhat, for example, they are named cups-devel. Complete details are in the BUILDING file with the source.</p>
<p>Second, on many Linux distributions there are optional gimp-print or gutenprint drivers. These drivers are not only for gimp, but can be used in any program to give you more exacting print control and in some cases much better output with photographs. Often many inkjet printers on Linux are supported by more than one driver - typically an 'ijs' driver and gimp-print. The difference lies mostly in the added options versus some speed loss. Gutenprint was known previously as gimp-print drivers.</p>
<title>Linux Printing with CUPS, Gimp-Print and Scribus</title>
<h2>Linux Printing with CUPS, Gimp-Print and Scribus</h2>
<p>CUPS, GIMP Print and Scribus together can give very good print output on Linux, provided it is installed and configured properly. With Scribus you can &#034;drive&#034; CUPS directly from Scribus.</p>
<p>First, make sure you have the the correct CUPS development libraries installed before compiling Scribus. On Redhat, for example, they are named cups-devel. Complete details are in the BUILDING file with the source</p>
<p>Second, on many Linux distributions there are optional gimp-print drivers. These drivers are not only for gimp, but can be used in any program to give you more exacting print control and in some cases much better output with photographs. Often many inkjet printers on Linux are supported by more than one driver - typically an 'ijs' driver and gimp-print. The difference lies mostly in the added options versus some speed loss. By the way, the next release of the gimp-print drivers will be known as gutenprint to avoid confusion.</p>
<p>The cups control panel in Scribus with the regular ijs plus ghostscript driver:</p>
<table width="100%"><tr><td align="center"><img align="center" alt="Cups Control Panel in Scribus" src="images/cups1.png" /></td></tr></table>
<h3>Hints:</h3>
19,14 → 19,14
<p>The main difference is the more refined color and ink density adjustments available in GIMP Print. Often it will be slower than other drivers, but the output quality is the main reason. You can also use kprinter in combination with other programs which are not CUPS aware, but can benefit from high quality printing. As an example, Acrobat Reader on Linux before version 7.0.5 does not recognize CUPS, but has a command line window to call kprinter. Thus, you can with the correct settings, print high resolution PDF's with the same high quality as Scribus. </p>
<p>What I recommend with CUPS is to set up your everyday printer with the ijs or regular kprinter driver and then add a second printer instance with GIMP Print, so you have quicker output with everyday docs like text files etc..</p>
<h3>PostScript Printers and CUPS</h3>
<p>Based on my experience working with a handful of true PostScript printers with Scribus:</p>
<p>Based on my experience working with a handful of true postscript printers with Scribus:</p>
 
<p>When you are using a real PostScript printer on Linux, expecially more complex ones which have multiple bins, sorting or advanced image and resolution settings, ideally you have the PPD file which comes on the driver disk with the printer. If not try to download the latest from the manufacturer's site. Then use the <strong>cupstestppd</strong> tool to verify the file. This is a very important step. </p>
<p>When you are using a real postscript printer on Linux, expecially more complex ones which have multiple bins, sorting or advanced image and resolution settings, ideally you have the PPD file which comes on the driver disk with the printer. If not try to download the latest from the manufacturer's site. Then use the <strong>cupstestppd</strong> tool to verify the file. This is a very important step. </p>
 
<p>A great many printer drivers come as windows .exe files. I know many of the HP ones are simple WinZip self extractors. Any recent wine will open them easily. Then, I strongly recommend that you run cupstestppd on the file to make sure it follows the PPD spec. If there is an error, and there are often minor ones, the actual specs are here:</p>
 
<a href="http://partners.adobe.com/public/developer/ps/index_specs.html">http://partners.adobe.com/public/developer/ps/index_specs.html</a>
 
<p><strong>cupstestppd</strong> is a command line utility which you can use to verify the correctness of PPD files. What is a PPD file ? A PPD file is a specially formatted text file which can be used on Linux, MacOSX and Windows to install a true PostScript printer. On Linux in combination with foomatic and CUPS it is used for <strong>all </strong>printers to enumerate all the printer's capabilities. This command line tool verifies that the ppd file meets the specs for ppd files. If there are issues, it will indicate how to remedy this. cupstestppd is most useful when using the manufactuerer's supplied PPD on Linux. </p>
<p><strong>cupstestppd</strong> is a command line utility which you can use to verify the correctness of PPD files. What is a PPD file ? A PPD file is a specially formatted text file which can be used on Linux, MacOSX and Windows to install a true postscript printer. On Linux in combination with foomatic and CUPS it is used for <strong>all </strong>printers to enumerate all the printer's capabilities. This command line tool verifies that the ppd file meets the specs for ppd files. If there are issues, it will indicate how to remedy this. cupstestppd is most useful when using the manufactuerer's supplied PPD on Linux. </p>
 
</qt>
/branches/Version133x/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/toolbox7.html
87,4 → 87,4
<p>Lastly, one other tool which works as a plug-in with GSview is <code>pstoedit</code> This is a command line tool for converting bitmap images into vectors and PostScript, which then, depending on the nature of the image, can be edited in a vector drawing tool like Inkscape or Skencil. See the section Import Hints for hints on how I used this to convert the Scribus logo into SVG and then a native Scribus file. GSview uses this as a plug-in to convert files into vector format. </p>
<p>GSview has been, in my experience, the most reliable and versatile EPS/PS viewer on Linux. How good is it ? Well, the best example is letting you know this usually installed on every Windows DTP workstation I support for clients. For DTP with Scribus, I consider it essential.</p>
 
</qt>
</qt>
/branches/Version133x/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/pdflavor.html
13,7 → 13,7
<li>PDF 1.3 = Acrobat 4.0 - The first version of PDF which truly had all the needed features to support "press-ready" PDF's including color management, ICC profiles etc. It also added javascript, interactive and multimedia capabilities. This standard is probably the safest to send if you are unsure of the capabilities of the receiver of your file. PDF/X-3 and a number of commercial print work flows are based on PDF 1.3.</li>
<li>PDF 1.4 = Acrobat 5.0 - Actually, introduced with Illustrator 9. The main difference to concern Scribus users is both transparency and alpha transparency capabilites. This makes a major difference in where a PDF with these features can be printed. It takes either the latest commercial RIPs or certain Level 3 PostScript printers to use these features properly. Moreover, not all Level 3 PostScript printers will handle transparency. The latest versions of Ghostscript support the advanced PDF 1.4 features Scribus can create when exporting PDF.<strong>The most distinguishing feature of PDF 1.4 for Scribus is the ability to export true transparency in PDF. </strong>Note: Often, the only way you will be able to print exactly the transparency features viewed on-screen is to export PDF 1.4 and print from Acrobat Reader 5.x or newer. </li>
<li>PDF 1.5 = Acrobat 6.0 - Among the most interesting for Scribus users: many improvements for "press-ready" PDF, the capability to have true layering within the PDF, PDF-X "pre-flight" capability, more security and interactive features, like the ability to add comments which are separate from the original doc. Scribus can support many PDF 1.5 features in the 1.3.x development version. PDF 1.5 can also support more sophisticated compression options for images using JPEG 2000. </li>
<li>PDF 1.6 = Acrobat 7.0 - Refinements of the 1.5 features and more extensive use of PKI and digital signing for document control, as well as, extended commenting for group collaboration. Where it concerns Scribus, nothing of importance, except the release of Adobe Reader 7.0 for Linux. </li>
<li>PDF 1.6 = Acrobat 7.0 - Refinements of the 1.5 features and more extensive use of PKI and digital signing for document control as well as extended commenting for group collaboration. Where it concerns Scribus, nothing of importance, except the release of Adobe Reader 7.0 for Linux. </li>
</ul>
<p>In deciding which version you choose for export, you need to consider the following: </p>
<ul>
/branches/Version133x/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/toolbox2.html
1,8 → 1,7
<qt>
<title>Other PDF/PS Viewers</title>
<title>Other PDF Viewers</title>
<h2>Other PDF Viewers</h2>
<p>Another useful PDF viewer to use with Scribus is GSview which is a graphical viewer/front end to Ghostscript. The latest version (4.8) with Ghostscript 8.5+ work very nicely together allow you to convert PS to PDF, as well as view and convert EPS, PS and PDF files among other tools. GSview runs natively on Linux/Unix. OS/2 and Windows. More details are in <a href="gsview.html">GSview and Scribus</a>.</p>
<p><strong>Kpdf 3.5+ / <a href="http://www.foolabs.com/xpdf/">Xpdf</a> </strong> The most recent Kpdf in KDE 3.4 shows me the the developers "get it". Based on Xpdf 3.x it has many nice touches and seems to be a pretty fast renderer. I say this not as a KDE fanboy, but based on using quite a bit in comparison to the larger Adobe Readers. One other note, look through Settings and enable "aggressive" in the performance options, if you have the required memory, enabling this makes a big difference in loading larger or complex documents. You still might want Xpdf 3.02+ from Foolabs, as includes some command line tools for converting PDFs to PS. To display properly embedded fonts with Xpdf in all PDFs, not just Scribus ones, you should read the Xpdf man page about setting up the fonts paths correctly via the .xpdfrc file. Otherwise, embedded fonts may not display properly. One known limitation is the inability to display transparency in Scribus generated PDFs.</p>
<p>When it is available in KDE 4, <a href="http://okular.kde.org/">Okular</a>, the sucessor to KPDF is a versatile PDF viewer which also can view a number of different image formats like Tiff and PSD. </p>
<p>Another useful PDF viewer to use with Scribus is GSview which is a graphical viewer/front end to Ghostscript. The latest version (4.7) with Ghostscript 7.07+ work very nicely together allow you to convert PS to PDF, as well as view and convert EPS, PS and PDF files among other tools. Version 4.3 is the first version to really work well under Linux (it was originally developed on another operating system). More details are in <a href="gsview.html">GSview and Scribus</a>.</p>
<p><strong>Kpdf 3.4+ / Xpdf </strong> The most recent Kpdf in KDE 3.4 shows me the the developers "get it". Based on Xpdf 3.x it has many nice touches and seems to be a pretty fast renderer. I say this not as a KDE fanboy, but based on using quite a bit in comparison to the larger Adobe Readers. One other note, look through Settings and enable the performance options, if you have the required memory. Enabling them makes a big difference. You still might want Xpdf 3.00+ from Foolabs, as includes some command line tools for converting PDFs to PS. To display properly embedded fonts with Xpdf in all PDFs, not just Scribus ones, you should read the Xpdf man page about setting up the fonts paths correctly via the .xpdfrc file. Otherwise, embedded fonts may not display properly. One known limitation is the inability to display transparency in Scribus generated PDFs.</p>
<p>For a taste of some of the cool PDF tricks Scribus can do, make sure you read through the sample docs located in the samples subdirectory of where the Scribus files are located. Maximize Acrobat Reader, open the file and follow the instructions. Consider it the first "Easter Egg" in Scribus.;)</p>
</qt>