Subversion Repositories Scribus

Compare Revisions

Ignore whitespace Rev 3287 → Rev 3286

/branches/Version13x/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/Makefile.am
1,6 → 1,6
SUBDIRS = tutorials images
 
EXTRA_DIST = about1.html about2.html cms.html cms2.html cms3.html cms4.html codingstandards.html contributions.html cross-platform.html cups.html developers.html doccopyright.html docinfo.html download.html faq1.html faq2.html faq3.html fonts1.html fonts2.html fonts3.html fonts4.html fonts5.html gettexthowto.html gsfont.html hyphenator.html importhints1.html importhints2.html importhints.html importhints3.html index.html install1.html install2.html install3.html install.html install-dpkg.html intro.html irc.html javascriptpdf.html keys.html machints1.html machints2.html menu.xml moncal.html mouse.html parallel-install.html pdflavor.html pdfexport1.html pdfexport2.html pdfexport3.html pdfexport4.html pdfx3.html pdf_form.html plugin_howto.html prepress.html print1.html print2.html print3.html readme.html resources.html scprinters.html scribuscopyright.html scribusfileformat.html scribus-svg.html scripter1.html scripter-extensions.html scripterapi-color.html scripterapi-constants.html scripterapi-dialogs.html scripterapi-doc.html scripterapi-font.html scripterapi-getobjprop.html scripterapi.html scripterapi-layer.html scripterapi-manobj.html scripterapi-object.html scripterapi-page.html scripterapi-select.html scripterapi-setobjprop.html scripterapi-textframes.html scripter-faq.html scripterapi-pydoc.html scripterapi-PDFfile.html scripterapi-Printer.html scripterapi-ImageExport.html settings1.html specs.html short-words.html toolbox10.html toolbox11.html toolbox12.html toolbox13.html toolbox1.html toolbox2.html toolbox3.html toolbox4.html toolbox5.html toolbox6.html toolbox7.html toolbox8.html toolbox9.html toolbox.html topten.html translation_howto.html otherinfo.html documentation.html tutorials.html
EXTRA_DIST = about1.html about2.html cms.html cms2.html cms3.html cms4.html codingstandards.html contributions.html cross-platform.html cups.html developers.html doccopyright.html docinfo.html download.html faq1.html faq2.html faq3.html fonts1.html fonts2.html fonts3.html fonts4.html fonts5.html gettexthowto.html gsadv.html gsfont.html gsview.html hyphenator.html importhints1.html importhints2.html importhints.html index.html install1.html install2.html install3.html install.html install-dpkg.html intro.html irc.html javascriptpdf.html keys.html machints1.html machints2.html menu.xml moncal.html mouse.html parallel-install.html pdflavor.html pdfexport1.html pdfexport2.html pdfexport3.html pdfexport4.html pdfx3.html pdf_form.html plugin_howto.html prepress.html print1.html print2.html print3.html readme.html resources.html scprinters.html scribuscopyright.html scribusfileformat.html scribus-svg.html scripter1.html scripter-extensions.html scripterapi-color.html scripterapi-constants.html scripterapi-dialogs.html scripterapi-doc.html scripterapi-font.html scripterapi-getobjprop.html scripterapi.html scripterapi-layer.html scripterapi-manobj.html scripterapi-object.html scripterapi-page.html scripterapi-select.html scripterapi-setobjprop.html scripterapi-textframes.html scripter-faq.html scripterapi-pydoc.html scripterapi-PDFfile.html scripterapi-Printer.html scripterapi-ImageExport.html settings1.html specs.html short-words.html toolbox10.html toolbox11.html toolbox12.html toolbox13.html toolbox1.html toolbox2.html toolbox3.html toolbox4.html toolbox5.html toolbox6.html toolbox7.html toolbox8.html toolbox9.html toolbox.html topten.html translation_howto.html otherinfo.html documentation.html tutorials.html
 
install-data-local:
$(mkinstalldirs) $(prefix)/share/scribus/doc/en/
27,12 → 27,13
$(INSTALL_DATA) $(srcdir)/fonts4.html $(prefix)/share/scribus/doc/en/fonts4.html
$(INSTALL_DATA) $(srcdir)/fonts5.html $(prefix)/share/scribus/doc/en/fonts5.html
$(INSTALL_DATA) $(srcdir)/gettexthowto.html $(prefix)/share/scribus/doc/en/gettexthowto.html
$(INSTALL_DATA) $(srcdir)/gsadv.html $(prefix)/share/scribus/doc/en/gsadv.html
$(INSTALL_DATA) $(srcdir)/gsview.html $(prefix)/share/scribus/doc/en/gsview.html
$(INSTALL_DATA) $(srcdir)/gsfont.html $(prefix)/share/scribus/doc/en/gsfont.html
$(INSTALL_DATA) $(srcdir)/hyphenator.html $(prefix)/share/scribus/doc/en/hyphenator.html
$(INSTALL_DATA) $(srcdir)/importhints.html $(prefix)/share/scribus/doc/en/importhints.html
$(INSTALL_DATA) $(srcdir)/importhints1.html $(prefix)/share/scribus/doc/en/importhints1.html
$(INSTALL_DATA) $(srcdir)/importhints2.html $(prefix)/share/scribus/doc/en/importhints2.html
$(INSTALL_DATA) $(srcdir)/importhints3.html $(prefix)/share/scribus/doc/en/importhints3.html
$(INSTALL_DATA) $(srcdir)/index.html $(prefix)/share/scribus/doc/en/index.html
$(INSTALL_DATA) $(srcdir)/install1.html $(prefix)/share/scribus/doc/en/install1.html
$(INSTALL_DATA) $(srcdir)/install2.html $(prefix)/share/scribus/doc/en/install2.html
136,7 → 137,9
-rm -f $(prefix)/share/scribus/doc/en/fonts4.html
-rm -f $(prefix)/share/scribus/doc/en/fonts5.html
-rm -f $(prefix)/share/scribus/doc/en/gettexthowto.html
-rm -f $(prefix)/share/scribus/doc/en/gsadv.html
-rm -f $(prefix)/share/scribus/doc/en/gsfont.html
-rm -f $(prefix)/share/scribus/doc/en/gsview.html
-rm -f $(prefix)/share/scribus/doc/en/hyphenator.html
-rm -f $(prefix)/share/scribus/doc/en/importhints1.html
-rm -f $(prefix)/share/scribus/doc/en/importhints2.html
/branches/Version13x/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/toolbox6.html
1,30 → 1,22
<qt>
<title>GSview and Scribus</title>
<h2>GSview and Scribus</h2>
<p><strong>Parts of this section are thanks to Russell Lang, author and maintainer of GSview, epstool and Ghostscript for his hints and patiently answering my questions about GSview and Ghostscript. It has allowed the Scribus Team to use some of the more advanced features of Ghostscript in Scribus. </strong></p>
<p>First off, It is in my very strong opinion, <strong>a superior replacement for gv and derivatives. Moreover, for viewing PDF for print purposes, it is more reliable than any other open source PDF viewer.</strong> Although Acrobat Reader&#174; is in my experience sometimes a better pure viewer for PDF, I also consider GSview one of the most essential tools to have when using Scribus. GSview has a handful of extremely useful functions. For those unfamiliar, it provides an easy to use &quot;front end&quot; to
Ghostscript, as well as <code>pstoedit</code> for converting bitmaps into vector files. For those coming from the Windows/Mac world, it also has the functionality of Distiller with a graphical front end for those applications which do not export PDF natively.</p>
<p>Second ensure you have the latest version 4.7+. (GSview migrated from the Windows world, where it has been excellent since the 4.x versions.)</p>
<p>Third, for GSview to work properly, the font paths must be setup in the GSview Preferences correctly. Notes further on.</p>
<title>GSview - Looking into the black box</title>
<h2>GSview - Looking into the black box</h2>
<p><em>Parts of this section are thanks to Russell Lang, author and maintainer of GSview, epstool and Ghostscript for his hints and patiently answering my questions about GSview and Ghostscript. It has helped the Scribus Team to use some of the more advanced features of Ghostscript to improve certain features of Scribus.</em> </p>
<p>Although Acrobat Reader&#174; is in my experience sometimes a better pure viewer for PDF, I also consider GSview one of the most essential tools to have when using Scribus. GSview has a handful of extremely useful functions. For those unfamiliar, it provides an easy to use "front end" to Ghostscript, as well as pstoedit for converting bitmaps into vector files. For those coming from the Windows/Mac world, it also has the functionality of Distiller with a graphical front end for those applications which do not export PDF natively.</p>
<p>First, make sure you have the latest version 4.6+. (GSview migrated from the Windows world, where it has been excellent since the 4.x versions.) Note: GSview uses the libgs.so shared library to access Ghostscript. Red Hat and Fedora Core-1 users are encouraged to get the Ghostscript source RPM from rawhide and enable the shared gs by switching the flag:</p>
<blockquote>
<table width="100%" border="1" bgcolor="#eeeeee"><tr><td border="0">
<small><pre>%define build_libgs 0</pre></small></td></tr></table>
</blockquote>
<p>to 1 in the rpm spec file</p>
<p>For use with Scribus, GSview has the following features:</p>
<ul>
<li>With the help of <a href="http://pstoedit.net">pstoedit</a>, you can convert bitmap images or PDF content back into SVG and other scalable vector file formats.</li>
<li>The ability to preview, convert and add previews (Tiff recommended) for raw EPS (Encapsulated Postscript Files). This is done using <a href="http://www.cs.wisc.edu/~ghost/gsview/epstool.htm">Epstool</a> from the same author. Epstool can also fix EPS files with incorrect or missing bounding boxes. This is a separate tool to be installed and works as a plugin like pstoedit.</li>
<li>The ability to extract text from a PDF.</li>
<li>The ability to preview, convert and add previews for raw Postscript files. An easy to use interface for creating PDF's in applications without the high level of export capabilities of Scribus. (You are still recommended to use the Export to PDF Scribus, as it is optimized for Scribus files.)</li>
<li>As an easy to use front end to Ghostscript's less well known features such as image conversion and re-sampling. The example below uses the <strong>epswrite</strong> &quot;device&quot;. There are others in Ghostscript including: converting between TIFF formats, changing the color depth of at TIFF, JPEG or the color space of an image.</li>
</ul>
<ul><li>With the help of pstoedit, you can convert bitmap images or PDF content back into SVG and other scalable vector file formats. </li>
<li>The ability to preview, convert and add previews (Tiff recommended) for raw EPS (Encapsulated PostScript Files).</li>
<li>The ability to extract text from a PDF. </li>
<li>The ability to preview, convert and add previews for raw PostScript files. An easy to use interface for creating PDFs in applications without the high level of export capabilities of Scribus. (You are still recommended to use the Export to PDF Scribus, as it is optimized for Scribus files.) </li>
<li>As an easy to use front end to Ghostscript's less well known features such as image conversion and re-sampling. The example below uses the epswrite "device". There are others in Ghostscript including: converting between TIFF formats, changing the color depth of at TIFF, Jpeg or the color space of an image.</li> </ul>
<p>One example where I use GSview with Scribus is for troubleshooting/fixing EPS files which do not display correctly within Scribus. Although many applications can generate EPS files, some add their own quirks into the EPS, which can cause problems when used in other applications (like Scribus).</p>
<p>So, if you find difficulty with an EPS or PDF you wish to use in Scribus, open the EPS in GSview. Then, use the key command <strong>M</strong> to display messages from Ghostscript. The messages can indicate problems which cause display or printing errors. You can also use the <strong>epswrite</strong> &quot;device&quot; to re-save the EPS, which can help to strip out or fix issues with an EPS.</p>
<p>You can also <em>rasterize</em> an EPS image like this, by converting to PNG or TIFF and then resize, adjust colors etc with an image program like GIMP or Corel Photoshop. I did this with a troublesome EPS and converted it to a 600DPI PNG, which would then display and print perfectly from Scribus. Sometimes when working with images and DTP there are several different ways to accomplish the same task - in my example, it was getting a complex EPS file from Illustrator to display and print properly from Scribus. The fact that there problem displaying the EPS, was not a bug in Scribus, but some non-standard postscript info in the file, which by using Ghostscript as a back end to GSview I could strip out and then display properly in Scribus.</p>
<p> Note: GSview uses the <code>libgs.so</code> shared library to access Ghostscript. Not all Linux distributions ship this, so the hints for compiling Ghostscript with a paralell install really apply here. </p>
<h4>Getting Gsview:</h4>
<p>Not all Linux distributions offer GSview. However, for those with rpm based systems, a simple rpm command will have you with an easy to install rpm. The GSview tarball already has a built-in spec file. A simple: </p>
<blockquote><table width="100%" border="1" bgcolor="#eeeeee"><tr><td border="0"><small>
<pre>
rpmbuild -tb ./gsview-4.7.tar.gz
</pre></small></td></tr></table></blockquote>
<p>Will get you started. Windows has a convetional setup.exe installer. Unfortunately, it is not yet available for MacOSX. </p>
<p>So, if you find difficulty with an EPS or PDF you wish to use in Scribus, open the EPS in GSview. Then, use the key command M to display messages from Ghostscript. The messages can indicate problems which cause display or printing errors. You can also use the epswrite "device" to re-save the EPS, which can help to strip out or fix issues with an EPS. GSview easily allows you access to most all of the Ghostscript drivers and devices.</p>
<p>You can also rasterize an EPS image like this, by converting to PNG or TIFF and then resize, adjust colors etc with an image program like GIMP or Corel Photoshop. I did this with a troublesome EPS and converted it to a 600dpi PNG, which would then display and print perfectly from Scribus. Sometimes when working with images and DTP there are several different ways to accomplish the same task - in my example, it was getting a complex EPS file from Illustrator to display and print properly from Scribus. The fact that there problem displaying the EPS, was not a bug in Scribus, but some non-standard PostScript information in the file, which by using Ghostscript as a back end to GSview I could strip out and then display properly in Scribus.</p>
<p>GSview since about 4.3, has been, in my experience, the most reliable and versatile PDF viewer along with Acrobat Reader on Linux. For DTP with Scribus, I consider it essential.</p>
<p>Now, for advanced hints with GSview and Ghostscript, see: <a href="toolbox7.html">Advanced Ghostscript and GSview Hints</a>. For detailed hints on setting up Ghostscript to help you find all your fonts, see: <a href="gsfont.html">Ghostscript Fonts</a>.</p>
</qt>
/branches/Version13x/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/gsview.html
2,7 → 2,7
<title>GSview and Scribus</title>
<h2>GSview and Scribus</h2>
<p><strong>Parts of this section are thanks to Russell Lang, author and maintainer of GSview, epstool and Ghostscript for his hints and patiently answering my questions about GSview and Ghostscript. It has allowed the Scribus Team to use some of the more advanced features of Ghostscript in Scribus. </strong></p>
<p>First off, It is in my very strong opinion, <strong>a superior replacement for ghostview, gv and derivatives.</strong> Although Acrobat Reader&#174; is in my experience sometimes a better pure viewer for PDF, I also consider GSview one of the most essential tools to have when using Scribus. GSview has a handful of extremely useful functions. For those unfamiliar, it provides an easy to use &quot;front end&quot; to
<p>First off, It is in my very strong opinion, a superior replacement for gv and derivatives. Although Acrobat Reader&#174; is in my experience sometimes a better pure viewer for PDF, I also consider GSview one of the most essential tools to have when using Scribus. GSview has a handful of extremely useful functions. For those unfamiliar, it provides an easy to use &quot;front end&quot; to
Ghostscript, as well as <code>pstoedit</code> for converting bitmaps into vector files. For those coming from the Windows/Mac world, it also has the functionality of Distiller with a graphical front end for those applications which do not export PDF natively.</p>
<p>Second ensure you have the latest version 4.7+. (GSview migrated from the Windows world, where it has been excellent since the 4.x versions.)</p>
<p>For use with Scribus, GSview has the following features:</p>
16,14 → 16,13
<p>One example where I use GSview with Scribus is for troubleshooting/fixing EPS files which do not display correctly within Scribus. Although many applications can generate EPS files, some add their own quirks into the EPS, which can cause problems when used in other applications (like Scribus).</p>
<p>So, if you find difficulty with an EPS or PDF you wish to use in Scribus, open the EPS in GSview. Then, use the key command <strong>M</strong> to display messages from Ghostscript. The messages can indicate problems which cause display or printing errors. You can also use the <strong>epswrite</strong> &quot;device&quot; to re-save the EPS, which can help to strip out or fix issues with an EPS.</p>
<p>You can also <em>rasterize</em> an EPS image like this, by converting to PNG or TIFF and then resize, adjust colors etc with an image program like GIMP or Corel Photoshop. I did this with a troublesome EPS and converted it to a 600DPI PNG, which would then display and print perfectly from Scribus. Sometimes when working with images and DTP there are several different ways to accomplish the same task - in my example, it was getting a complex EPS file from Illustrator to display and print properly from Scribus. The fact that there problem displaying the EPS, was not a bug in Scribus, but some non-standard PostScript info in the file, which by using Ghostscript as a back end to GSview I could strip out and then display properly in Scribus.</p>
<p> Note: GSview uses the <code>libgs.so</code> shared library to access Ghostscript. Not all Linux distributions ship this, so the hints for compiling Ghostscript with a paralell install really apply here. </p>
<h4>Getting Gsview:</h4>
<p>Not all Linux distributions offer GSview. However, for those with rpm based systems, a simple rpm command will have you with an easy to install rpm. The GSview tarball already has a built-in spec file. A simple: </p>
<p> Note: GSview uses the <code>libgs.so</code> shared library to access Ghostscript. Redhat and Fedora Core-1 users are encouraged to get the Ghostscript source RPM from rawhide and enable the shared Ghostscript by switching the flag:</p>
<blockquote><table width="100%" border="1" bgcolor="#eeeeee"><tr><td border="0"><small>
<pre>
rpmbuild -tb ./gsview-4.7.tar.gz
</pre></small></td></tr></table></blockquote>
<p>Will get you started. Windows has a convetional setup.exe installer. Unfortunately, it is not yet available for MacOSX. </p>
%define build_libgs 0
</pre>
</small></td></tr></table></blockquote>
<p>to 1 in the rpm spec file
<p>GSview since about 4.3, has been, in my experience, the most reliable and versatile PDF viewer along with Acrobat Reader on Linux. For DTP with Scribus, I consider it essential.</p>
<p>Now, for advanced hints with GSview and Ghostscript, see: <a href="toolbox7.html">Advanced Ghostscript and GSview Hints</a></p>
</qt>
/branches/Version13x/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/fonts3.html
1,7 → 1,7
<qt>
<title>CJK, Indic Script and Other non-Latin Fonts</title>
<h2>CJK, Indic Script and Other non-Latin Fonts</h2>
<p>CJK (Chinese, Japanese, Korean) usage in Scribus is possible. Actually, except for adding KOIR-8 encodings, not much has been done to support CJK fonts (yet). However, some users have reported some success, including using exported PDFs for commercial print jobs. Thanks to QT's excellent Unicode support, already some of the work is done. Major work is underway on the next generation of Scribus to vastly expand support for non-Latin scripts. Stay tuned.</p>
<p>CJK (Chinese, Japanese, Korean) usage in Scribus is possible. Actually, except for adding KOIR-8 encodings, not much has been done to support CJK fonts (yet). However, some users have reported some success, including using exported PDFs for commercial print jobs. Thanks to QT's excellent Unicode support, already some of the work is done. Major work is underway on the next genration of Scribus to vastly expand support for non-Latin scripts. Stay tuned.</p>
<h4>So, what Scribus can do now ?</h4>
<ul>
<li>Almost any good Unicode font will display individual glyphs in Scribus. Testing with large Unicode fonts such as Bitsream Cyberbit font shows no issues in display or printing, except for loading speed. </li>
10,19 → 10,19
<li>Indic Scripts are a much more difficult task, however, we have strong interest in supporting them. One developer has been working with Scribus developers to modify the display canvas to fully support the special features needed to display and print them properly.</li>
<li>Glyph combining in these languages is not supported (yet).</li>
<li>Scribus supports both Unicode TrueType fonts and OpenType Fonts, even if you export PDF 1.3.</li>
<li>Exported EPS or Postscript works fine with most CJK or Unicode fonts.</li>
<li>Exported EPS or PostScript works fine with most CJK or Unicode fonts.</li>
<li>Cyrillic works perfectly and Scribus has active translators for Russian and Ukrainian.</li>
</ul>
<h4>Hints: </h4>
<ul>
<li>To reduce the size of your exported PDF and Postscript files either:
<li>To reduce the size of your exported PDF and PostScript files either:
<ol>
<li>Convert all fonts in text frames to Postscript outlines. </li>
<li>Convert all fonts in text frames to PostScript outlines. </li>
<li>Enable sub-setting of any Unicode or CJK TrueType font in Settings > Fonts.</li>
</ol>
</li>
<li>When viewing in Acrobat Reader, enable the preference for smooth artwork display. See the <a href="toolbox1.html">Acrobat Reader section</a>.</li>
<li>If you are exporting to SVG, conversion of text to Postscript outlines is almost always more satisfactory.</li>
<li>If you are exporting to SVG, conversion of text to PostScript outlines is almost always more satisfactory.</li>
<li>Some Unicode fonts are quite large and will slow launching Scribus significantly. You should expect higher memory usage as well. Scribus does some very needed sanity checks on fonts upon loading.</li>
</ul>
</qt>
/branches/Version13x/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/topten.html
11,7 → 11,7
<li><strong>Save Paper</strong> - Instead of printing a proof, export a low res PDF and open in Acrobat Reader. A properly setup PDF will display on the screen with a great deal of fidelity to the printed page.</li>
<li><strong>Use PNG</strong>, in place of jpeg or gif. PNG is a much more versatile image format and it usually prints much better at the same resolution. Most importantly, it uses lossless compression and compresses some types of images really well. Lastly, the<a href="toolbox4.html"> GIMP</a>, which most users have as their primary bitmap editor, does a superb job of handling PNG, as well as compressing them very well.</li>
<li><strong>Get a good Ghostscript</strong>- The newest8.x versions are <strong>much better </strong>at helping Scribus import EPS and generating high quality print previews. Versions 8.1x+ allows the best print previews in Scribus as they enable proper transparency and CMYK previewing.</li>
<li><strong><a href="fonts2.html">Get good fonts</a></strong> - By good fonts, we mean high quality Type 1 or TrueType fonts from foundries like Adobe Bitstream and Monotype. Luckily, the available MS Web fonts are also pretty reliable in postscript printing. A good source of fonts is the collection of Bitstream fonts included with most versions of Corel Draw. We know people who have used these fonts for years and can't remember a font problem with these fonts. Most disks have the same font in Type and TrueType versions. Some Adobe applications, like Pagemaker or InDesign include a small collection of useful high quality Type 1 fonts. This will make printing and PDF creation much more reliable.</li>
<li><strong><a href="fonts2.html">Get good fonts</a></strong> - By good fonts, we mean high quality Type 1 or TrueType fonts from foundries like Adobe Bitstream and Monotype. Luckily, the available MS Web fonts are also pretty reliable in PostScript printing. A good source of fonts is the collection of Bitstream fonts included with most versions of Corel Draw. We know people who have used these fonts for years and can't remember a font problem with these fonts. Most disks have the same font in Type and TrueType versions. Some Adobe applications, like Pagemaker or InDesign include a small collection of useful high quality Type 1 fonts. This will make printing and PDF creation much more reliable.</li>
<li><strong>Page Templates</strong> can be big time saver. Anytime you have common elements on several pages, add those elements to a template. This also avoids accidently moving or deleting objects.</li>
<li><strong>Backup your Preferences</strong> - This is more important for users of CVS versions of Scribus. Occasionally - <strong>much less</strong> common now, a program crash caused by a bad image etc., can corrupt your preferences. So, to get a good replacement setup, close Scribus and rename the hidden <code>.scribus</code> folder in your home directory to <code>.scribusbak</code>. Reopen Scribus with no document open and change every setting as you wish and then close Scribus. Now copy the whole directory somewhere else. Then, if you have weird behavior in Scribus, the first thing to do is copy the good <code>.scribus</code> directory over the current one and restart. This is also important if, you have lots of custom keyboard shortcuts.</li>
<li><strong>A cool trick</strong> for precision adjustments. This may or may not work on your workstation, depending on how your wheel mouse is configured. You can use the mouse wheel with the spin boxes instead of clicking the arrows. For small steps, put the cursor to the far right, as shown below. Then spin the mouse wheel up and down to adjust the measurement or setting. This adjusts 10ths of a unit. For larger adjustments, put the cursor to the left side. For extra slow and precise adjustments 100th of a unit, Hold Crtl - Shift keys while moving the wheel mouse up and down. Since I discovered this by accident.<br />
18,6 → 18,6
<table width="100%"><tr><td align="center"><img src="images/spinbox1.png" title="Place the cursor as indicated by the arrow" alt="Place the cursor as indicated by the arrow" /></td></tr></table><br />
</li>
<li><strong>Bonus</strong> - subscribe to the Scribus mailing list. You can get this in digest form daily. The list is active, polite and newbies and experts alike are welcome. Do not be shy to ask questions, Linux gurus might be new to DTP and vice versa. <a href="http://nashi.altmuehlnet.de/mailman/listinfo/scribus">Scribus Mailing List Info</a> If you have tips you would like to share post them to the list. We will ensure they are considered and credited properly.</li>
<li><strong>Extra Bonus</strong> - How to ask questions and file bug reports/issues on the mailing list? First, in newer versions go to <strong>Help > About </strong> and include the build info. <a href="menuhelp.html">More details</a> Then, look in the <a href="http://nashi.altmuehlnet.de/pipermail/scribus/">mailing list archives</a> or on the <a href="http://bugs.scribus.net">Bug Tracker</a>, you might find your answer there. Then, make sure you add relevant details like which distribution, version of Scribus, versions of relevant packages or libraries. e.g. version of XFree86 if you have video or font issues. This helps the developers and other knowledgable users to respond quicker and more accurately. <strong>Note:</strong> If you are using a CVS version of Scribus, please also include the build date.</li>
<li><strong>Extra Bonus</strong> - How to ask questions and file bug reports/issues on mailing list? First, in newer versions go to <strong>Help > About </strong> and include the build info. <a href="menuhelp.html">More details</a> Then, look in the <a href="http://nashi.altmuehlnet.de/pipermail/scribus/">mailing list archives</a> or on the <a href="http://bugs.scribus.net">Bug Tracker</a>, you might find you answer there. Then, make sure you add relevant details like which distribution, version of Scribus, versions of relevant packages or libraries. e.g. version of XFree86 if you have video or font issues. This helps the developers and other knowledgable users to respond quicker and more accurately. <strong>Note:</strong> If you are using a CVS version of Scribus, please also include the build date.</li>
</ol>
</qt>
/branches/Version13x/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/importhints1.html
2,25 → 2,12
<title>Notes on Importing EPS into Scribus</title>
<h2>Notes on Importing EPS into Scribus</h2>
 
<p>To better your chances of successfully importing EPS files it helps to have three ingredients:</p>
<ul>
<li>An EPS file which is conformant to the published specs. Not all applications export EPS files with the same level of fidelity, nor do all embed fonts properly.</li>
<li>The latest Ghostscript available for your platform.</li>
<li>Where an EPS file has fonts embedded, ensuring Ghostscript's font paths are setup correctly.See: <a href="gsfont.html">Ghostscript Fonts</a> for hints.</li></ul>
<p>There are two basic methods of importing EPS files and both have pluses and minuses. The first is simply importing the EPS file into an image frame, much like the methods used by the GIMP or Photoshop. That is <em>rasterize</em>, or turn the EPS file into a bitmap like a tiff or jpeg. The second and often preferred method is to import the EPS into Scribus as native objects. Both have trade-offs, partly because of the inherent nature of EPS files. Like PDF, most, if not all EPS are not meant to be edited, but EPS is more of an an exchange format. However, importing them as native Scribus objects can allow some editing of some of the content, as well as re-scaling them without loss of resolution.</p>
<p>To better your chances of sucessfully importing EPS files it helps to have three ingredients: 1) An EPS file which is conformant to the published specs. Not all applications export EPS files with the same level of fidelity. 2 ) The latest Ghostscript available for your platform. 3) Where an EPS file has fonts embedded, ensuring Ghostscript's font paths are setup correctly.</p>
<p>There are two basic methods of importing EPS files and both have pluses and minuses. The first is simply importing the EPS file into an image frame, much like the methods used by the GIMP or Photoshop. That is <em>rasterize</em>, or turn the EPS file into a bitmap. The second and often preffered method is to import the EPS into Scribus as native objects. Both have trade-off, partly because of the inherent nature of EPS files. Like PDF, most if not all EPS are not meant to be edited, but importing them as native Scribus objects can allow some editing of some of the content. </p>
 
<h3>Importing EPS as an Image</h3>
<p>When you wish to import an EPS into Scribus and it has a mix of text, images and vector, this is the only real option. Importing in this manner, provided the fonts are correctly embedded usually works very reliably and will maintain fidelity to the CMYK colors defined in the EPS. On initial import Scribus will ignore any embedded preview tiff or pict and will generate its own low resolution preview of the EPS. If nothing displays this is a hint something is not working correctly in the import and needs closer inspection. When exporting to PDF, the EPS is rerun through Ghostscript as it is embedded into the PDF, so do not be surprised about long PDF export times or high memory usage.
</p>
<p>place holder</p>
 
<h3>Importing EPS as native Scribus objects.</h3>
<p>Importing EPS as Scribus native objects, when possible, does have some advantages. First, they are all vector, so file size and exported size are relatively small. It makes them resolution independent, so they can be re-scaled without losing crispness in printing. And - you can edit the graphical elements like lines, polygons and curves natively.</p>
 
<h4>Importing Hints:</h4>
<p>One of my preferred ways to import EPS files in to Scribus is to close all open documents. Then directly import the EPS file. This creates a new document in which the page size is automatically calculated from the EPS bounding box. Save this temporarily under a file name. Then, re-open the target document for import. Create a new layer and then use the page import function to import your newly created document into the new layer in your existing document. This prevents any of the imported elements from disturbing existing objects and allows you to place with precision where you want the file.</p>
 
<h4>Troubleshooting EPS Import </h4>
<p>As mentioned above, EPS export quality from other applications can vary widely. Some applications like to add their own ingredients to the sauce - unfortunately. The first step for testing a failed import is open the file in <a href="toolbox6.html" >GSview</a>, then press <strong>M</strong> to watch the messages from Ghostscript as it attempts to open the file. When you have a failure in GSview, the messages can be sometime cryptic, but they are a helpful pointer to see what is the problem.</p>
<p></p>
 
<p>placeholder</p>
</qt>
/branches/Version13x/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/about1.html
19,6 → 19,7
<p>Andreas Vox - pronounced [fox] -- started with 1.3.0. ported to Mac native (Scribus/Aqua), font api specialist, hates C++, likes good layout and has a stupid comment for anything: 38, teacher (to be), [Mac OS/X]</p>
 
 
 
<h2>The Supporting Cast</h2>
<h4>Active users/contributors who have added to the Scribus community (in no particular order):</h4>
 
48,6 → 49,4
 
<p>"Lukasz [DeeJay1] Jernas" - PLD Linux package maintainer and user support in #scribus </p>
 
<p>Howard White - Retired Pre-Press Engineer - Testing and testing and more testing. Always daring to test bleeding edge code. </p>
 
<p>Cedric Gemy - Graphics Professor and author - UI testing and feedback.</p>
<p>JL Ghali - works on the native Win32 port of Scribus.</p>
/branches/Version13x/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/contributions.html
2,7 → 2,7
<title>Contributions to the documentation<</title>
<h2>Contributions to the documentation</h2>
 
<p>This documentation website is the third generation of the Scribus documentation. The initial documents that these were developed from were written by Peter Linnell with help from Franz Schmid. As the Scribus team has grown, and the various contributions from other people has also grown, we have seen a number of additions and updates. The following table attempts to list in alphabetical order the main contributors to the documentations. Hopefully we dont miss any of you out (if so, please contact us and we will add you in):
<p>This documentation website is the second generation of the Scribus documentation. The initial documents that these were developed from were written by Peter Linnell with help from Franz Schmid. As the Scribus team has grown, and the various contributions from other people has also grown, we have seen a number of additions and updates. The following table attempts to list in alphabetical order the main contributors to the documentations. Hopefully we dont miss any of you out (if so, please contact us and we will add you in):
</p>
 
<table border="1">
25,6 → 25,5
<tr bgcolor="#eeeeee"><td>Frederic Dubuy</td><td>French</td></tr>
<tr bgcolor="#eeeeee"><td>Johannes R&#252;schel</td><td>German</td></tr>
<tr bgcolor="#eeeeee"><td>Louis Desjardin</td><td>French</td></tr>
<tr bgcolor="#eeeeee"><td>Volker Ribbert</td><td>German</td></tr>
</table>
</qt>