Subversion Repositories Scribus

Compare Revisions

Ignore whitespace Rev 4499 → Rev 4500

/branches/Version13x/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/toolbox1.html
3,11 → 3,15
<h2>Adobe Reader</h2>
<h4>Using "Hidden" Features with Adobe Reader and Scribus</h4>
 
<p>Adobe Reader&#174; 7 is in my experience one of the essential tools to have when using Scribus. Although mostly a simple viewer, it has some advanced features which no other PDF viewer has in the Linux,*nix world: full support for JavaScript with a PDF (You did not know a PDF was scriptable? Scribus is unique in the Linux/*nix world for the ability to create scriptable interactive PDF forms) and detailed information which is embedded in the PDF, but viewable only in Adobe Reader.</p>
<p>Adobe Reader&#174; 7.0.5 is in my experience one of the essential tools to have when using Scribus. Although mostly a simple viewer, it has some advanced features which no other PDF viewer has in the Linux,*nix world: full support for JavaScript with a PDF (You did not know a PDF was scriptable? Scribus is unique in the Linux/*nix world for the ability to create scriptable interactive PDF forms) and detailed information which is embedded in the PDF, but viewable only in Adobe Reader.</p>
 
<p>For MacOSX and Windows users, the above applies, as well. We do not recommend judging colors or correctness in the Mac Preview application either. </p>
 
<p> Moreover, while PDF is a published standard, Adobe invented PostScript on which PDF is based and has a commercial incentive to promote PDF on all platforms.</p>
<h3>Hints for Scribus users:</h3>
<p><strong>We highly recommend upgrading to the latest Adobe Reader 7. </strong>Simply put, there is nothing else more capable of rendering PDF correctly. Whatever your objections were to older versions (and there were some substantial ones), this latest version 7 amelorates the vast majority of them. It is far more stable, bug free and now has a modern look and feel. <strong>Any PDF rendering issues with Scribus exported PDF in other viewers should be cross-checked with Reader 7 before reporting bugs to us. </strong>We are aware of one color mismatch with RGB images and transparency in PDF 1.4. Yes, this has been duly reported as a bug to Adobe too.</p> <p><strong>Details:</strong> As soon there is an extended graphics state parameter dictionary present which contains any transparency related setting, AcroReader switches into CMYK mode showing incorrect colours. My local printer confirmed this strange behaviour even with files not generated by scribus, its clearly a bug from Adobe.</p>
<p><strong>We highly recommend upgrading to the latest Adobe Reader 7.0.5. </strong>Simply put, there is nothing else more capable of rendering PDF correctly. Whatever your objections were to older versions (and there were some substantial ones, most notably on Linux), this latest version 7 amelorates the vast majority of them. It is far more stable, bug free and loads quicker than Version 6.x. On Linux it now has a modern look and feel. Version 7.0.5 also has direct support for CUPS and allows many extra printing options for printing. <strong>Any PDF rendering issues with Scribus exported PDF in other viewers should be cross-checked with Reader 7 before reporting bugs to us. </strong>
<h4>Known Issues:</h4>
We are aware of color mismatches when viewing PDFs which have some kinds of transparency in PDF 1.4. Yes, this has been duly reported as a bug to Adobe too.</p> <p><strong>Details:</strong> As soon there is an extended graphics state parameter dictionary present which contains any transparency blend space operators, Adobe Reader 7.x switches into CMYK mode showing incorrect colours. My local printer confirmed this strange behaviour even with files not generated by scribus, its clearly a bug from Adobe.</p>
<h3>Tweaking the Viewer Preferences</h3>
 
<p>Right away, getting the preferences right in Reader is important to ensure the default preferences to set improve the reliability for our purposes with Scribus. There are a many preferences in Reader 7. The page display part is the most important. </p>