Subversion Repositories Scribus

Compare Revisions

Ignore whitespace Rev 3348 → Rev 3349

/trunk/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/scripter1.html
2,25 → 2,38
<title>Scripting Scribus with Python</title>
<h2>Scripting Scribus with Python</h2>
 
<h4>Abstract</h4>
<p>This is the description how to use the Scripting Plugin for Scribus. This Plugin allows you to use the powerful Python Language as a Scripting Language in Scribus.</p>
<h4>Overview</h4>
<p>This is the description how to use the Scripting plug-in for Scribus. The scripter allows you to use the powerful Python Language as a scripting language in Scribus. This can allow you to automate otherwise repetitive tasks among other features. </p>
 
<p>This manual is the first version, by no means complete or fully accurate. There are just a couple of commands written in red letters aren't yet implemented yet in this version.</p>
<p>This manual is the first version, by no means complete or fully accurate. Additions to the scripter are made frequently, so a short note to the mailing list is in order if you have questions.</p>
 
<p>There are some simple example scripts in the samples subdirectory where Scribus is installed. If you have created scripts which would be useful for other users, please feel free to contribute a copy to the program author, Franz Schmid. Hopefully, in the near future, a Scribus plug-in gallery will be added.</p>
<p>There are some simple example scripts in the samples subdirectory where Scribus is installed. If you have created scripts which would be useful for other users, please feel free to upload it to www.scribus.net or mail mrdocs at scribus.info with an attachment. We hope to add a plug-in gallery to the main website in the future. </p>
 
<h3>Using the Plugin</h3>
<h3>Using the Plug-in</h3>
 
<table width="100%"><tr><td align="center"><img src="images/Scripter.png" align="center" alt="Running a script" title="Running a script" /></td></tr></table>
 
<p>To execute a Python Script select "Script-&gt;Execute Script..." Scribus will display a File select Box which allows you to select a Python Script. Below there is an extra Menu item "Recent Scripts" where all your recent Scripts are remembered. How many Scripts are remembered depends on your Setting for Recent Documents in the Scribus Preferences.</p>
<p>To execute a Python Script select "Script-&gt;Execute Script..." Scribus will display a File select Box which allows you to select a Python Script. Below that, there is a menu item "Recent Scripts" where the most recently run scripts are listed. The number listed depends on your preferences setting. </p>
 
<p>You can use many Python Programs with this Plugin. The only exception are Scripts who expect Parameters from the Command Line. They won't work because the Plugin gives the Python Interpreter an empty Command Line.</p>
<p>You can use many Python modules with this Plug-in. The only exception are scripts who expect parameters from the command Line. They won't work because the plug-in gives the Python interpreter an empty command line.</p>
 
<p>The Menu Item "Show Console" gives you an interactive Python Console, where you can execute Commands directly. There is no need to do a "from scribus import *", this has already been done. You can use all the following Commands in the Scripter API section directly without any Prefix.</p>
<p>The menu item "Show Console" gives you an interactive Python console, where you can execute commands directly. There is no need to do a "from scribus import *", this has already been enabled in the console. You can use all the commands in the Scripter API section directly without any prefix.</p>
 
<p>You can get some useful informations about any script calling "Script-&gt;About Script...".</p>
<p>You can find some useful information about any script calling "Script-&gt;About Script...". This info box may give some hints on usage and or other python modules which may need to be installed for a script to work properly. </p>
 
<p>You can display this Reference Manual when you select "Help-&gt;Scripter Manual...".</p>
<h4>Error Reporting</h4>
<p>When running scripts from the menu, if the script fails, the scripter will catch the exceptions and display a dialog box with the error. It also helpfully copies this to your system clipboard for pasting in a bug report or a mail client for further information. </p>
 
<h4>Scripter Preferences</h4>
<table width="100%"><tr><td align="center"><img src="images/scripterprefs.png" align="center" title="Scripter Preferences" alt="Scripter Preferences"/></td></tr></table>
 
<ul>
<li><strong>Enable Scripter Extensions</strong> is <strong>off</strong> by default. Enabling this does have some security implications. This only enable it if you trust the script or who wrote it. Python gives you full access to the file system and any permissions you have as a user extend to the scripter. Startup extensions and macros are scripts which are run when the scripter is initialized. In the example above, this script enables http network access.</li>
<li><strong>Import All Names at Start-up</strong> enables "from Scribus import *" when starting the Scripter console.</li>
<li><strong>Enable Legacy Name Aliases</strong> enables using OldStyle function names in Scripts. If you have self written scripts, you should update them to the new function names as they will be removed at some point in the future.</li>
<li><strong>Use Fake Stdin</strong> replaces sys.stdin with a fake one. Some scripts will try to read from sys.stdin. The prevents Scribus from hanging when the script cannot access sys.stdin.</li>
</ul>
 
<p>You can display the full Scripter reference manual when you select "Help-&gt;Scripter Manual...".</p>
 
</qt>
/trunk/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/print1.html
1,7 → 1,7
<qt>
<title>Printing in Depth</title>
<h2>Printing in Depth</h2>
<p>One of the challenges of an advanced DTP application like Scribus, is the ability to generate what I refer to as "high-level" postscript or PDF features. By <em>high level</em>, this is meant to describe things like transparency, blends, masks and gradients, usually created by professional grade DTP applications and illustration programs. <strong>Always</strong> make sure you have the newest updated version of CUPS and Ghostscript available for your distribution. Newer versions of CUPS and Ghostscript are much better at supporting the kinds of high level PS3 and PDF features Scribus can create.</p>
<p>One of the challenges of an advanced DTP application like Scribus, is the ability to generate what I refer to as "high-level" postscript or PDF features. By <em>high level</em>, this is meant to describe things like transparency, blends, masks and gradients, usually created by professional grade DTP applications and illustration programs. <strong>Always</strong> make sure you have the newest updated versions of CUPS and Ghostscript available for your distribution. Newer versions of CUPS and Ghostscript are much better at supporting the kinds of high level PS3 and PDF features Scribus can create.</p>
<h3>Basic Options:</h3>
<ul>
<li>Print to your default printer with the defaults set either by kprinter, CUPS or Lprng, depending on your specific installation. You can also specify printing in gray scale, as well as reverse the order of printing, which makes the pages stack in correct order on many ink jet printers.</li>
16,7 → 16,7
 
<ul>
<li>&#034;Print&#034; a postscript file, which can be later &#034;distilled&#034; or transferred for processing by a printer or service bureau.</li>
<li>If you have the <strong>Gimp Print</strong> modules, selecting Options will bring up a panel similar to the one below. The exact contents will vary with the capabilities of the printer - one very good reason for having CUPS-Gimp Print. These modules are much less &quot;generic&quot; than many other printer drivers. When installed correctly they enable you to use all the options you printer is capable of handling such as different paper type, duplex modes, color printing modes etc. Scribus directly supports <strong>Gimp-Print</strong> drivers with CUPS, These high quality drivers are optimized for printing high resolution prints from ink-jet printers. The specific details are here: <a href="cups.html">CUPS and Gimp-Print</a>.</li>
<li>If you have the <strong>Gimp Print</strong> modules, selecting Options will bring up a panel similar to the one below. The exact contents will vary with the capabilities of the printer - one very good reason for having CUPS-Gimp Print. These modules are much less &quot;generic&quot; than many other printer drivers. When installed correctly, they enable you to use all the options your printer is capable of handling such as: different paper types, duplex modes, color printing modes etc. Scribus directly supports <strong>Gimp-Print</strong> drivers with CUPS, These high quality drivers are optimized for printing high resolution prints from ink-jet printers. The specific details are here: <a href="cups.html">CUPS and Gimp-Print</a>.</li>
</ul>
<table width="100%"><tr><td align="center"><img src="images/printer1.png" alt="Setup Printer Dialog" title="Advanced CUPS Options in Scribus"/></td></tr></table>
 
/trunk/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/irc.html
12,7 → 12,7
<h4>Give Details</h4>
<p>It helps to know more than, "Something broke and now blah does not work." </p>
<ul>
<li>Start by saying which platform you are on and what version of Qt, is always helpful.</li>
<li>Start by saying which platform you are on and what version of Qt, knowing this immediately is always helpful. Some issues are platform or distribution specific.</li>
<li>Describe your problem in a way which makes it easy for others to answer. </li>
<li>Be prepared to answer specific questions about which versions of applications are installed.</li></ul>
 
/trunk/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/pdfx3.html
25,7 → 25,7
 
<h3>How has Scribus been able to do this?</h3>
<ul>
<li>The PDF Exporter within Scribus is now in its seventh generation. By carefully refining the code both PDF output and color management for maximum quality output, Scribus created PDFs can be used with confidence for output to service bureaus that can use a PDF work-flow. Many magazines,newspapers and other publications now prefer PDF/X for advertiser created files for example. See the notes in <a href="prepress.html">Scribus and Pre-Press Considerations</a>.</li>
<li>The PDF Exporter within Scribus is now in its seventh generation. By carefully refining the code both PDF output and color management for maximum quality output, Scribus created PDFs can be used with confidence for output to service bureaus that can use a PDF work-flow. Many magazines, newspapers and other publications now prefer PDF/X for advertiser created files for example. See the notes in <a href="prepress.html">Scribus and Pre-Press Considerations</a>.</li>
<li>Credit must be given to Marti Maria for creating and actively maintaining <strong>little cms</strong> which is the color management system which Scribus uses. littlecms is not a end user application per se, but gives Scribus the color management tools, which were previously only available in proprietary systems.</li>
</ul>
 
37,7 → 37,7
 
<h3>What are the differences between PDF-X versions?</h3>
<p>In brief, <strong>PDF/X-1a</strong> requires the following: The color space to be CMYK/greyscale, all the fonts are embedded and the PDF indicates whether it is either pre-trapped = true or not-trapped = false. Think of this as a blind hand-off, as there is no certainty of how it will output.</p>
<p><strong>PDF/X-2</strong> is a looser standard - but with the requirement for more knowledge between the supplier and receiver of the file. Fonts are not required to embedded and it is possible to use OPI (Open Press Initiative). PDF/X-2 also allows device dependent color spaces, like CieLab, to be used.</p>
<p><strong>PDF/X-2</strong> is a looser standard - but with the requirement for more knowledge between the supplier and receiver of the file. Fonts are not required to embedded and it is possible to use OPI (Open Press Initiative). PDF/X-2 also allows device in dependent color spaces, like CieLab, to be used.</p>
<p><strong>PDF/X-3</strong> allows for ICC color profiles to be resident in the PDF, as well as different output intents and 'DeviceN' (spot color) color space - now supported in the AFPL version of Ghostscript 8.0+. This also allows overprinting colors.</p>
 
<h3>How do I test and really certify Scribus PDF files are truly PDF/X-3 compliant?</h3>
/trunk/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/pdfexport3.html
12,7 → 12,7
<li>Choose the lowest quality setting for compression which has acceptable on-screen viewing results.</li>
<li>You can often substitute Arial for Helvetica, as later viewers will often have this as an included font.</li>
<li>Avoid importing EPS or PDFs into your document - instead convert them to PNG with GSview, then place in your Scribus document. Why? They will render faster on your screen and often make for a smaller file size.</li>
<li>Avoid using the Nimbus fonts, if they are not at least sub-set. Acrobat Reader on other platforms does a poor job of substitution using its included fonts. One other issue which can trip you up is Helvetica is often alised to Nimbus Sans L on many distros.</li>
<li>Avoid using the Nimbus fonts, if they are not at least sub-set. Acrobat Reader on other platforms does a poor job of substitution using its included fonts. One other issue which can trip you up is Helvetica is often alaised to Nimbus Sans L on many distros.</li>
<li>Unless transparency in artwork is needed, select PDF 1.3 output for the greatest compatibility with other users.</li>
</ul>
</qt>
/trunk/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/cms4.html
4,7 → 4,7
<h4>PDF/X-3 and Color Management</h4>
<p>Above, we covered the basics of getting color management working and configured properly. Now, let's consider using PDF/X-3 to optimize our output for commercial printing. PDF/X-3 is the latest and most advanced ISO standard for PDF files and Scribus fully supports it, as well as being the first DTP app to be able to directly export PDF/X-3 conforming files.</p>
 
<p>The principal benefit of PDF/X-3 is the typically more accurate color conversion from RGB to a printer's CMYK output. The accuracy come from working in RGB colors until the very late in the printing process when the printer's own RIP does the RGB >CMYK conversion. The downside is only the latest and most updated RIPs support PDF/X-3, although others may support earlier PDF/X-x standards. As the RIP engine has detailed knowledge of the exact color range and capabilities, it is thought to offer, in most cases, a more accurate conversion. PDF/X-3 does not preclude using CMYK images, but is ideal for maintaining your colors in RGB as long as possible in the process. </p>
<p>The principal benefit of PDF/X-3 is the typically more accurate color conversion from RGB to a printer's CMYK output. The accuracy comes from working in RGB colors until the very late in the printing process when the printer's own RIP does the RGB >CMYK conversion. The downside is only the latest and most updated RIPs support PDF/X-3, although others may support earlier PDF/X-x standards. As the RIP engine has detailed knowledge of the exact color range and capabilities, it is thought to offer, in most cases, a more accurate conversion. PDF/X-3 does not preclude using CMYK images, but is ideal for maintaining your colors in RGB as long as possible in the process. </p>
<p>The major downside to working in PDF/X-3 are twofold: You cannot use transparency natively. PDF/X-3 is based on PDF-1.3, which does not support transparency. The second is the limited, but growing number of printers who can support it. If in doubt, inquire. My testing show very reliable results with a minimum of color shifting. </p>
<p></p>
<p>The other issue is which printer profile should I use. There are two strategies: The first is to have an actual ICC profile from your print for the matching paper type. The second is to use a well-known printing standard as SWOP, ECI or others. Using PDF/X-3 requires cooperation from your printer, but can really improve your print color matching. As always, a short visit to your printer <strong>in advance</strong> is strongly recommended. If answers are not forthcoming, try another one. Printing is a competitive business and alternatives almost always can be found.
/trunk/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/pdflavor.html
11,15 → 11,15
<li>PDF 1.2 = Acrobat 3.0 - relatively obsolete now
</li>
<li>PDF 1.3 = Acrobat 4.0 - The first version of PDF which truly had all the needed features to support "press-ready" PDF's including color management, ICC profiles etc. It also added javascript, interactive and multimedia capabilities. This standard is probably the safest to send if you are unsure of the capabilities of the receiver of your file. PDF/X-3 and a number of commercial print work flows are based on PDF 1.3.</li>
<li>PDF 1.4 = Acrobat 5.0 - Actually, introduced with Illustrator 9, The main difference to concern Scribus users is both transparency and alpha transparency capabilites. This makes a major difference in where a PDF with these features can be printed. It takes either the latest commercial RIPs or certain Level 3 PostScript printers to use these features properly. Moreover, not all Level 3 PostScript printers will handle transparency. The latest versions of Ghostscript support the advanced PDF 1.4 features Scribus can create when exporting PDF.<strong>The most distinguishing feature of PDF 1.4 for Scribus is the ability to export true transparency in PDF. </strong>Note: Often, the only way you will be able to print exactly the transparency features viewed on-screen is to export PDF 1.4 and print from Acrobat Reader 5.x or newer. </li>
<li>PDF 1.5 = Acrobat 6.0 - Among the most interesting for Scribus users: many improvements for "press-ready" PDF, the capability to have true layering within the PDF, PDF-X "pre-flight" capability, more security and interactive features, like the ability to add comments which are separate from the original doc. Scribus can support many PDF 1.5 features in the 1.3.x development version. PDF 1.5 can also support more sophisticated compression options for images. </li>
<li>PDF 1.6 = Acrobat 7.0 - Refinements of the 1.5 features and more extensive use of PKI and digital signing for document control as well as extended commenting for group collaboration. Where it concerns Scribus, nothing of importance, except the release of Adobe Reader 7.0 for Linux. </li>
<li>PDF 1.4 = Acrobat 5.0 - Actually, introduced with Illustrator 9. The main difference to concern Scribus users is both transparency and alpha transparency capabilites. This makes a major difference in where a PDF with these features can be printed. It takes either the latest commercial RIPs or certain Level 3 PostScript printers to use these features properly. Moreover, not all Level 3 PostScript printers will handle transparency. The latest versions of Ghostscript support the advanced PDF 1.4 features Scribus can create when exporting PDF.<strong>The most distinguishing feature of PDF 1.4 for Scribus is the ability to export true transparency in PDF. </strong>Note: Often, the only way you will be able to print exactly the transparency features viewed on-screen is to export PDF 1.4 and print from Acrobat Reader 5.x or newer. </li>
<li>PDF 1.5 = Acrobat 6.0 - Among the most interesting for Scribus users: many improvements for "press-ready" PDF, the capability to have true layering within the PDF, PDF-X "pre-flight" capability, more security and interactive features, like the ability to add comments which are separate from the original doc. Scribus can support many PDF 1.5 features in the 1.3.x development version. PDF 1.5 can also support more sophisticated compression options for images using JPEG 2000. </li>
<li>PDF 1.6 = Acrobat 7.0 - Refinements of the 1.5 features and more extensive use of PKI and digital signing for document control as well as extended commenting for group collaboration. Where it concerns Scribus, nothing of importance, except the release of Adobe Reader 7.0 for Linux. </li>
</ul>
<p>In deciding which version you choose for export, you need to consider the following: </p>
<ul>
<li><strong>Where am I ultimately printing ?</strong> - If you are planning to have your files printed commercially, always try to ask the printer first.</li>
<li><strong>Does my document have transparency features ?</strong> - See above and ensure the rest of your equipment or workflow can support PDF 1.4. </li>
<li><strong>I am exporting PDF forms. How do I know end receivers of my file can use it ?</strong> - Do you know the version of Acro Reader your users will have ? One </li>
<li><strong>I am exporting PDF forms. How do I know end receivers of my file can use it ?</strong> - Do you know the version of Acro Reader your users will have ? The safest is to use PDF 1.3 or 1.4.</li>
<li><strong>Do I need layers ?</strong> - Only PDF 1.5 supports this and only in the 1.3.x version of Scribus. Be aware support for PDF 1.5 is not complete in most open source viewers. Ghostscript 8.5x does support some, but not all PDF 1.5 features. </li>
</ul>
<p></p>
/trunk/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/toolbox7.html
81,7 → 81,7
<p>Next,if installed, open up GSview and go to <strong>Options.. &#062; Advanced Configure</strong>. Then, make sure the &#034;Ghostscript Shared Object&#034; is pointing at the correct libgs.so. Below is how I have setup GSview on my system.: </p>
<table width="100%"><tr><td align="center"><img src="images/gsadv1.png" alt="GSview - Advanced Options Panel" align="middle" title="GSview - Advanced Options Panel" /></td></tr></table>
 
<p>Next, we need to tell Scribus where to find the newer GS. Go <strong>Edit..&#062; Preferences.. &#062;General</strong>. Then in External Tools, add the path the new GS.</p>
<p>Next, we need to tell Scribus where to find the newer GS. Go <strong>Edit..&#062; Preferences.. &#062;General</strong>. Then in External Tools, add the path of the new GS.</p>
<table width="100%"><tr><td align="center"><img src="images/gsadv2.png" alt="Scribus External Tools Preferences" align="middle" title="Scribus External Tools Preferences" /></td></tr></table>
<p>Another tool which is available with GSview is <code>epstool</code>. An older version is shipped with the current GSview 4.6, but a newer one is available on the GSview home page. This is a great command line tool, which can perform advanced EPS/DCS 2.0 conversion. This is very useful when someone sends you an EPS file from other DTP applications - even those created on Macs. Upgrading this to work with GSview gives you excellent support on Linux to handle EPS files from all platforms. Recommended.</p>
<p>Lastly, one other tool which works as a plug-in with GSview is <code>pstoedit</code> This is a command line tool for converting bitmap images into vectors and PostScript, which then, depending on the nature of the image, can be edited in a vector drawing tool like Inkscape or Skencil. See the section Import Hints for hints on how I used this to convert the Scribus logo into SVG and then a native Scribus file. GSview uses this as a plug-in to convert files into vector format. </p>
/trunk/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/toolbox8.html
1,11 → 1,11
<qt>
<title>Imagemagick</title>
<h2>Imagemagick</h2>
<p>Is a command-line image converter processor. While it does have a GUI display called Display, it powerful in three ways:</p>
<p>Is a command-line image converter processor. While it does have a GUI display called Display, it is powerful in three ways:</p>
 
<ul><li>A batch conversion application.</li>
<li>Ability to handle a wide range of image formats.</li>
<li>The newest versions understand color management and use littlecms, just like Scribus.</li></ul>
 
<p>Imagemagick is kind of a black box for image processing, but incredibly powerful when used properly.</p>
<p>Imagemagick is kind of a black box for image processing, but incredibly powerful when used properly. Versions for Linux, Windows and MacOSX are available.</p>
</qt>
/trunk/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/print3.html
8,11 → 8,12
 
<h4>If they accept PDF, which level ?</h4>
 
<p> PDF 1.3 (Acrobat 4), PDF 1.4 (Acrobat 5) or PDF/X-3 (ISO Standard) ? If they accept PDF/X-3, consider yourself lucky. This type of PDF is the most advanced for commercial printing and is expressly designed to assure good color fidelity between systems. If they can recommend specific ICC profiles to use, then even better.</p>
<p> PDF 1.3 (Acrobat 4), PDF 1.4 (Acrobat 5) or PDF/X-3 (ISO Standard) ? If they accept PDF/X-3, consider yourself lucky. This type of PDF is the most advanced for commercial printing.
PDF/X is expressly designed to assure good color fidelity between systems. If they can recommend specific ICC profiles to use, then even better.</p>
 
<h4>Will they be converting the PDF to other formats like EPS? </h4>
 
<p>Be aware, not all DTP apps are capable of supporting some of the advanced PS3 or PDF 1.4 features Scribus supports. Unless the printer's systems are using PDF 1.4, this is <strong>not</strong> a recommended solution.</p>
<p>Be aware, not all page layout app;ications are capable of supporting some of the advanced PS3 or PDF 1.4 features Scribus supports. Unless the printer's systems are using PDF 1.4, this is <strong>not</strong> a recommended solution.</p>
 
<h4>Can they provide an ICC profile of their printer if color fidelity is critical?</h4>
 
20,7 → 21,7
 
<p>This can be a determining factor in how you prepare the files. If their RIP is 3015.xxx+, you can be sure their RIP can handle 100% of the features of Scribus. They might not be able to directly answer that, but... </p>
 
<p>Consult <a href="prepress.html">The Pre-Press Notes</a> and you can even take a printed copy of the PDF with you if the printer has not heard of Scribus. Soon we will have online a listing of printers who support Scribus.</p>
<p>Consult <a href="prepress.html">The Pre-Press Notes</a> and you can even take a printed copy of the PDF with you if the printer has not heard of Scribus. We have an online a listing of printers who support Scribus. See: <a href="scprinters.html">Scribus Printers</a></p>
 
<p>If there remains unanswered issues, ask on the mailing list or on IRC. Usually, there is someone knowledgable who can answer your questions.</p>
 
/trunk/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/pdfexport1.html
8,12 → 8,12
<p>The platform neutral nature of PDF enables Scribus users to overcome a number of potential barriers to Linux and DTP. Scribus reliably exports high quality, "press-ready" PDF including advanced PDF 1.4 features, ISO compliant PDF/X-3 and ICC color managed PDFs, thanks to <a href="http://www.littlecms.com">little cms</a>. If your printer is skeptical, point them to <a href="prepress.html">Scribus Pre Press</a>. This is a downloadable PDF which outlines pre-press tests on Scribus, along with other supplementary info.</p>
<p>If Scribus only created high resolution commercial grade PDFs, that alone would make Scribus a great application. The bonus is all the easy to use versatility such as: creating presentations &#225; la Powerpoint or creating web-enabled PDF interactive forms which can be used with electronic document exchange, the ability to use JavaScript to control elements within the PDF. Scribus provides other user friendly touches like annotations, bookmarks and optionally, document security, if needed.</p>
<p>While PDF in one sense is a proprietary standard, it is also widely available on most every computing platform. It is also extremely well documented. The PDF 1.5 reference manual is a <em>mere</em> 1100 pages. The PDF abilities in Scribus enables for <strong>repurposing</strong> a document. One document can be produced for printing, web download or for presentation like StarOffice Impress or MS Power point. That this is a future trend in publishing is indicated by the same strategy in Adobe's InDesign 2.0+ and the new PDF capabilities in Quark Xpress 6 and Adobe Illustrator 10+. In electronic publishing and pre-press production, both have seen many enhancements to PDF, which often overcome the limitations of HTML and traditional postscript, respectively.</p>
<p>Your best viewing / printing results will be with the newest version of Acrobat Reader 5.0.8 for Linux and version 6.0+ on other platforms, where it is available. Testing has shown the Linux version is missing some functionality in the JavaScript capabilities of Version 4.05 and 5.0.8 on Linux. Some of these bugs are not present in Acrobat Reader 5.0.5+ on the Mac or Win32.</p>
<p>One of the challenges with PDF and EPS viewers on Linux, is that Scribus creates high end PS level 3 and PDF 1.4, with capabilities beyond most of the open source viewers. Some of these features are only supported in commercial pre-press or DTP tools. Two plus years of working with Scribus has led me to the current conclusion that the following three viewers are the most reliable at displaying PS/EPS/PDF created by Scribus:</p>
<p>Your best viewing / printing results will be with the newest version of Acrobat Reader 5.0.10 or Adobe Reader 7.0.1 for Linux and version 6.0+ on other platforms, where it is available. Please also note, <strong>gv and derivatives are not suitable viewers</strong> for Scribus EPS or PDFs. Similarly, Adobe Reader on MacOSX is given preference over the built-in Preview app.</p>
<p>One of the challenges with PDF and EPS viewers on Linux, is that Scribus creates high end PS level 3 and PDF 1.4, with capabilities beyond most of the open source viewers. Some of these features are only supported in commercial pre-press or DTP tools. Moreover, none of the open source viewers are capable of correctly interpreting color managed PDF. Two plus years of working with Scribus has led me to the current conclusion that the following three viewers are the most reliable at displaying PS/EPS/PDF created by Scribus:</p>
<ul>
<li><strong>Adobe Reader 5.0.8+ for Linux</strong> - The best and sometimes the only choice for PDF viewing. Detailed notes and hints: <a href="toolbox1.html">Adobe Reader</a>.</li>
<li><strong>GSview 4.7+</strong> - with the latest version of Ghostscript available. This combination is your best choice for viewing EPS files, PS files and most PDFs. In addition, GSview has many other very useful capabilities with add-ons like <code>pstoedit</code> and <code>epstool</code>. For more detailed notes and hints: <a href="toolbox6.html">GSview</a>. I consider it an essential tool for DTP on Linux.</li>
<li><strong>Kpdf 3.4+</strong> - This updated PDF viewer from KDE 3.4has a new rendering engine and is capable of viewing PDF 1.5 files.</li>
<li><strong>Kpdf 3.4+</strong> - This updated PDF viewer from KDE 3.4 has a new rendering engine and is capable of viewing PDF 1.5 files.</li>
</ul>
<p><strong>If any other PDF or EPS viewer you choose cannot display PDFs from Scribus, but they do view properly in Acrobat Reader, file a bug with the upstream author. In virtually all cases I have tested, it is a limitation of the viewing application. Scribus PDFs are tested daily with specialist pre-press software to validate their adherence to the published PDF specifications.</strong></p>
</qt>
/trunk/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/cms2.html
21,16 → 21,14
 
<p><strong>Monitor Gamma</strong> - Gamma simply put is a number which represents the brightness of neutrals or grays. Having Gamma accurately setup is an important first step in getting good color balance before trying to creating an accurate profile. The monitor profiler from littlecms is well designed to help you set this correctly.</p>
 
<p>The next step is in accuracy is a custom generated profile created with profiling software, like the ones in the the littlecms profile constructor set. <a href="moncal.html">See the instructions for profiling your monitor for details.</a> It was interesting to see how similar the profile was to one created with professional pre-press color calibration software and a hardware tool under Windows 2000.</p>
<p>The next level in accuracy is a custom generated profile created with profiling software, like the ones in the the littlecms profile constructor set. <a href="moncal.html">See the instructions for profiling your monitor for details.</a> It was interesting to see how similar the profile was to one created with professional pre-press color calibration software and a hardware tool under Windows 2000.</p>
 
<p>The most precise way to profile a monitor is with a electronic profiling device, basically a very special type of camera which measures color. The software sends known reference colors to the monitor which then read the output to the profiling device and creates a profile. Linux drivers for common "<strong>spiders</strong>" or colorimeters are not yet available, but the profiler can use hardware when device drivers are written. Users who have created custom profiles with a "spider" under Windows, might have try using this same profile if the monitor is set up exactly as in Windows AND if the Linux video driver does not make any radical adjustments to the color values of your display. It is worth trying at least! My "spider" created monitor profile works very well with Scribus. With color management activated, the colors within Scribus are just about exactly the same in Photoshop 6.0. Quite an achievement by both Scribus and littlecms!</p>
 
<p><strong>Scribus Color Management Settings</strong></p>
 
<p><strong>System Profiles -</strong> These drop down boxes show the available profiles on your system. To enable Scribus to use profiles, they should be copied to the <pre>$prefix/share/Scribus/profiles</pre> directory or you can put them somewhere in your home directory and point to this directory in your preferences.. Color profiles, .icm and .icc, are platform independent, thus files created or available for a Mac or Windows are usable in Linux with littlecms in Scribus, as well. See the links page for more info where to obtain profiles. I highly recommend having the Adobe profiles which are shown on the links page if you plan to do an type of cross platform or commercial printing, as most well set up DTP workstations, as well as most commercial printers will be able to work with these profiles.</p>
<table width="100%"><center><img src="images/colormgmtscreen.png" title="Color Managment Options" alt="Color Management Options"/></center></td></tr></table>
 
<p><strong>System Profiles -</strong> These drop down boxes show the available profiles on your system. To enable Scribus to use profiles, they should be copied to the <pre>$prefix/share/Scribus/profiles</pre> directory or you can put them somewhere in your home directory and point to this directory in your preferences.. Color profiles, .icm and .icc, are platform independent, thus files created or available for a Mac or Windows are usable in Linux with littlecms in Scribus, as well. See the links page for more info where to obtain profiles. I highly recommend having the Adobe profiles which are shown on the links page if you plan to do an type of cross platform or commercial printing, as most well set up DTP workstations, as well as most commercial printers will be able to work with these profiles.</p>
 
<p>The above screen cap is a good starting point to explain the important parts of littlecms in Scribus. In this case, the images in the document have been created with a mid-range digital camera. The camera's itself performs come automatic color balancing and auto adjusts the output for the sRGB range or <strong>color space</strong>. So, leaving this within sRGB is a good choice. If the images came from a scanner, you would want to select the profile created with scanner profiling software.</p>
 
<p>Solid colors can be described within <strong>RGB</strong>
/trunk/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/toolbox1.html
7,7 → 7,7
 
<p> Moreover, while PDF is a published standard, Adobe invented PostScript on which PDF is based and has a commercial incentive to promote PDF on all platforms.</p>
<h3>Hints for Scribus users:</h3>
<p><strong>We highly recommend upgrading to the latest Adobe Reader 7. </strong>Simply put, there is nothing else more capable of rendering PDF correctly. Whatever your objections were to older versions (and there were some substantial ones), this latest version 7 amelorates the vast majority of them. It is far more stable, bug free and now has a modern look and feel. <strong>Any PDF rendering issues with Scribus exported PDF in other viewers should be cross-checked with Reader 7 before reporting bugs to us. </strong>We are aware of one color mismatch with RGB images and transparency in PDF 1.4. Yes, this has been duly reported as a bug to Adobe too.</p> <p><strong>Details:</strong> As soon there is an extended graphics state parameter dictionary present which contains any transparency related setting AcroReader switches into CMYK mode showing no incorrect colours. My local printer confirmed this strange behaviour even with files not generated by scribus, its clearly a bug from Adobe.</p>
<p><strong>We highly recommend upgrading to the latest Adobe Reader 7. </strong>Simply put, there is nothing else more capable of rendering PDF correctly. Whatever your objections were to older versions (and there were some substantial ones), this latest version 7 amelorates the vast majority of them. It is far more stable, bug free and now has a modern look and feel. <strong>Any PDF rendering issues with Scribus exported PDF in other viewers should be cross-checked with Reader 7 before reporting bugs to us. </strong>We are aware of one color mismatch with RGB images and transparency in PDF 1.4. Yes, this has been duly reported as a bug to Adobe too.</p> <p><strong>Details:</strong> As soon there is an extended graphics state parameter dictionary present which contains any transparency related setting, AcroReader switches into CMYK mode showing incorrect colours. My local printer confirmed this strange behaviour even with files not generated by scribus, its clearly a bug from Adobe.</p>
<h3>Tweaking the Viewer Preferences</h3>
 
<p>Right away, getting the preferences right in Reader is important to ensure the default preferences to set improve the reliability for our purposes with Scribus. There are a many preferences in Reader 7. The page display part is the most important. </p>
/trunk/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/toolbox5.html
4,7 → 4,7
 
<p>For those not familiar, Ghostscript strictly defined is a PostScript interpreter and many programs use GS for PostScript conversions and import/export. Likewise, Scribus uses Ghostscript, sometimes using some of the most advanced features available only in newer versions. </p>
 
<p>With regard to Scribus, there are two major issues: Ghostscript is a kind of black box command line tool with, sometimes obscure or difficult to understand switches. Accessing many of these is made much easier with GSview, noted later. The other is there have been some major improvements in the 8.x versions, especially with advanced PS3, PDF 1.4 features and high end printing features. The next section outlines a possible way to upgrade to the latest version, without breaking your existing CUPS/Foomatic/GIMP print setup.</p>
<p>With regard to Scribus, there are two major issues: Ghostscript is a kind of black box command line tool with sometimes obscure or difficult to understand switches. Accessing many of these is made much easier with GSview, noted later. The other is there have been some major improvements in the 8.x versions, especially with advanced PS3, PDF 1.4 features and high end printing features. The next section outlines a possible way to upgrade to the latest version, without breaking your existing CUPS/Foomatic/GIMP print setup.</p>
 
<p>While Ghostscript originates from a commercial company and is dual licensed, the Ghostscript developers are very OSS friendly and have been very helpful to the Scribus team, especially with documentation and learning some of the more esoteric features. Ghostscript is one of core building blocks of OSS software. It would be hard to imagine OSS software without it.</p>
 
/trunk/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/pdf_form.html
2,7 → 2,7
<title>How To Create Your First PDF Web Form with Scribus</title>
<h2>How To Create Your First PDF Web Form with Scribus</h2>
<p><em><strong>With many thanks to Maciej Hanski</strong>, who kindly translated this from the Polish original, licenced under the FDL.</em></p>
<p><strong>The sample files, <code>scribusformphp.tar.gz</code>, a tarball of php file and sample doc, are available from http://docs.scribus.net</a></p>
<p><strong>The sample files, <code>scribusformphp.tar.gz</code>, a tarball of a php file and a sample doc, are available from http://docs.scribus.net</a></p>
 
<p>One of the biggest advantages of Scribus is the possibility to create PDF forms with embedded JavaScript scripts (in Adobe's own version, as described in the Adobe JavaScript Reference at http://partners.adobe.com/asn/developer/pdfs/tn/5186AcroJS.pdf</p>
 
/trunk/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/scprinters.html
1,7 → 1,7
<qt>
<title>Scribus Friendly Printers</title>
<h2>Scribus Friendly Printers</h2>
<p>Once you have your masterpiece created, sometimes the next step is getting is commercially printed.</p>
<p>Once you have your masterpiece created, sometimes the next step is getting is your file commercially printed.</p>
<h4>What defines a "Scribus Friendly Printer" ?</h4>
<p>First and foremost the ability to handle PDF directly without conversion to other formats. Conversion for placement into other page layout applications is <strong>not</strong> recommended and may result in reduced print quality. Ideally, a printer can handle a Scribus file natively, but is not a necessity. The most important is the ability to handle correctly newer versions of PDF without further alteration.</p>
<p>This list is by no means comprehensive, but are printers who have been involved in developing Scribus and or have expressed a willingness to handle Scribus files natively or as PDF: </p>
/trunk/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/pdfexport2.html
12,7 → 12,7
<p><strong>Presentation Effects</strong> - the recommended settings are down-sample all images to 72, 96 or 120 dpi, depending on the resolution of the display screen. Embed all fonts and landscape page layouts will give you maximum image area on the screen if you plan on using a display projector. More hints on Presentation PDFs further on.</p>
</li>
<li>
<p><strong>Press Optimized</strong> - Clear all down-sampling or compression of images where image quality is of utmost importance. All images brought into to Scribus as placed images should be a minimum of 200 dpi and preferably 300 dpi or more for photos or TIFFs. Line art or vector graphics converted to an EPS in a program like Illustrator should have a minimum of 800 dpi for best results. Most vector EPS can be imported directly as native Scribus objects and recommended where possible. <strong>If your printer supports color managed PDF/X-3, This is the recommended method for optimal results. However, only the latest printing technology can support it and you should only enable this when your printer advises. </strong>.</p>
<p><strong>Press Optimized</strong> - Clear all down-sampling or compression of images where image quality is of utmost importance. All images brought into to Scribus as placed images should be a minimum of 200 dpi and preferably 300 dpi or more for photos or TIFFs. Line art or vector graphics converted to an EPS in a program like Illustrator should have a minimum of 800 dpi for best results. Most vector EPS can be imported directly as native Scribus objects and recommended where possible. <strong>If your printer supports color managed PDF/X-3, This is the recommended method for optimal results. However, only the latest printing technology can support PDF/X-3. You should only enable this when your printer advises. </strong>.</p>
</li>
<li>
<p><strong>Print Optimized</strong> - This would mean targeting the PDF for printing on an office laser jet or ink jet. Recommended settings: down-sample all images to 300 dpi or less, embed fonts and keep your page margins with enough tolerance for margin limits on desktop and common office laser printers (approx. 6/10th of an inch or 15cm.)</p>
/trunk/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/readme.html
13,9 → 13,9
Version 1.2.2+ supports OpenOffice.org 2.x/Star Office 8.x (OASIS) as well.
</p>
 
<p>Scribus 1.2.3 also includes 2 icc color profiles to make sure color management is working immediately after install. Note that these are basic generic profiles not sufficient to ensure good color management. See the help files for details under <a href="cms.html">color management</a>. Grey scale icc profiles in images are not supported in this release.</p>
<p>Scribus 1.2.4 also includes 2 icc color profiles to make sure color management is working immediately after install. Note that these are basic generic profiles not sufficient to ensure good color management. See the help files for details under <a href="cms.html">color management</a>. Grey scale icc profiles in images are not supported in this release.</p>
 
<p>Scribus 1.2.3 also supports the proposed OpenIcc standard icc profile locations: $home/color/icc and /usr/share/color/icc/ under linux. Scribus will automatically detect them in these locations. Some distro neutral rpms for installing profiles are available on www.scribus.net.</p>
<p>Scribus 1.2.4 also supports the proposed OpenIcc standard icc profile locations: $home/color/icc and /usr/share/color/icc/ under linux. Scribus will automatically detect them in these locations. Some distro neutral rpms for installing profiles are available on www.scribus.net.</p>
 
<p>For detailed changes please see the ChangeLog.</p>
 
56,13 → 56,14
This we believe is a libart issue and not fixable by us. The gradient will export
and print properly.</p>
<strong> For Debian Users: </strong>
<strong> For Debian/Ubuntu Users: </strong>
<p>
If Scribus does not start while complaining about the absence of
PostScript fonts please install either xfonts-scalable or gsfonts-x11.
They are in the "Recommends" and will be installed by all sensible apt
front-ends.
</p>
</p>
<p>We recommend all Debian/Ubuntu users to use the Scribus Debian Repository for updated Scribus package. These are newer and contain many bug fixes and updates, compared to the ones installed by default. See http://debian.scribus.net </p>
<p><strong> For SuSE 9.x Users:</strong></p>
<ul>
<li>The littlecms libs 1.10, which shipped with Suse 9.0 does not offer complete
/trunk/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/importhints3.html
2,9 → 2,9
<title>Scribus and OpenOffice.org</title>
<h2>Scribus and OpenOffice.org.org</h2>
<h4>Overview</h4>
<p>The open and XML based file format used by OpenOffice.org in all versions, share some common traits with Scribus, The clear documentation and specs have helped the Scribus Team to create very useful import features. Expect more enhancements in the future. One of the pleasant surprises to see in the OpenOffice.org version 2 beta releases is the improved EPS exporter. The 1.1.x version sometimes had difficulties exporting correctly. The exporter in V 2.x in testing here seems to create better, more conformant files, which Scribus imports with little difficulties. Except for OpenOffice.org Writer files, the magic trick to get high quality imports into Scribus depends on using OO.org Draw. Almost any type of OpenOffice.org file can be imported into Scribus with high fidelity, provided you export from Draw as EPS. Native Draw files can usually be imported directly into Scribus. </p>
<p>The open and XML based file format used by OpenOffice.org in all versions, share some common traits with Scribus. The clear documentation and specs have helped the Scribus Team to create very useful import features. Expect more enhancements in the future. One of the pleasant surprises to see in the OpenOffice.org version 2 beta releases is the improved EPS exporter. The 1.1.x version sometimes had difficulties exporting correctly. The exporter in V 2.x in testing here seems to create better, more conformant files, which Scribus imports with little difficulties. Except for OpenOffice.org Writer files, the magic trick to get high quality imports into Scribus depends on using OO.org Draw. Almost any type of OpenOffice.org file can be imported into Scribus with high fidelity, provided you export from Draw as EPS. Native Draw files can usually be imported directly into Scribus. </p>
<h4>Importing from OpenOffice.org.org Writer</h4>
<p>The singular most important issue to take into consideration for hassle free OO.org Writer import is well chosen usage and correctly applying styles in OO.org. Doing so will greatly reduce the amount of time needed within Scribus formatting and styling text. Any special paragraph styles in your Writer document will automatically be imported into your existing Scribus layout. When importing text from OO.org there are three important options which need to be carefully considered:</p>
<p>The singular most important issue to take into consideration for hassle free OO.org Writer import is well chosen usage and correctly applying styles in OO.org. Doing so will greatly reduce the amount of time needed within Scribus to format and style text. Any special paragraph styles in your Writer document will automatically be imported into your existing Scribus layout. When importing text from OO.org there are three important options which need to be carefully considered:</p>
 
<table width="100%"><tr><td align="center"><img src="images/oogettext1.png" alt="Import Options for OO.org Writer and OASIS (Open Document) files." align="middle" title="Import Options for OO.org Writer and OASIS (Open Document) files." /></td></tr></table>
 
/trunk/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/scribus-svg.html
11,7 → 11,7
 
<h4>SVG Importing Hints:</h4>
<p>Scribus can handle most of the SVG features which can be created in Inkscape and Sketch, two well known vector drawing programs for Linux. The biggest issue I have observed is sometimes the paths when interpreted do not show up as closed. So parts of the SVG file look empty upon import. The simple fix is to ungroup the elements and then select the empty looking objects, then double click to bring up the editing palette for drawing objects and click on the close path button. Typically, then the invisible object will appear.</p>
<p>I generally avoid creating special text effects in SVG, unless a: It cannot be done in Scribus and Scribus has very versatile text effect tools. b: The text effects are converted to outlines before importation. Why ? Scribus uses a postscript model for handlingfonts and text, where SVG uses a model much like html. </p>
<p>I generally avoid creating special text effects in SVG, unless a: It cannot be done in Scribus and Scribus has very versatile text effect tools. b: The text effects are converted to outlines before importation. Why ? Scribus uses a postscript model for handling fonts and text, where SVG uses a model much like html. </p>
 
<h3>Scribus - SVG Q and A</h3>
<h4>What is an SVG?</h4>
36,17 → 36,17
<ul>
<li>Easy to implement. The SVG file format is based on XML and has many similarities to Scribus' native file format.</li>
<li>SVG is a scalable vector graphics, so graphics do not become pixellated when zoomed.</li>
<li>They are XML format, text based and quick to load - much smaller than bitmap images. A typical SVG files is under 10k.</li>
<li>They are in XML format, text based and quick to load - much smaller than bitmap images. A typical SVG file is under 10k.</li>
<li>SVG is an open XML-based standard from the W3 consortium</li>
<li>It is platform neutral</li>
<li>Can be scripted for user interaction and control. Also has support for ICC color spaces so color display accurately, even within a browser.</li>
<li>Browser support is increasing. KDE has fairly complete native support for SVG in KDE 3.2+. KSVG will is now part of the kdegraphics package. More details: <a href="http://svg.kde.org/preview_kde32.html">svg.kde.org</a></li>
<li>Browser support is increasing. KDE has fairly complete native support for SVG in KDE 3.2+. KSVG will is now part of the kdegraphics package. More details: <a href="http://svg.kde.org">svg.kde.org</a></li>
<li>SVG can also be color managed and supports a well defined way to specify ICC profiles.</li>
</ul>
 
<h4>What about browser support?</h4>
<p>Mozilla has long had special builds which have native SVG support. Mozilla trunk code is regularly built with SVG support. You can find them on the Mozilla ftp site. Also interesting is the
latest SVG plug-in from Adobe it works well in my testing with Mozilla 1.4+ and in Konqueror.</p>
latest SVG plug-in from Adobe; it works well in my testing with Mozilla 1.4+ and in Konqueror.</p>
<h4>Where can I learn more?</h4>
<p><a href="http://www.svgx.org/">SVG Foundation</a> has a wealth of links and news.</p><p>Other links are listed in the <a href="sclinks.html">Links page</a></p>
<h4>A Scribus page displayed in a browser:</strong></h4>
/trunk/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/toolbox2.html
2,6 → 2,6
<title>Other PDF Viewers</title>
<h2>Other PDF Viewers</h2>
<p>Another useful PDF viewer to use with Scribus is GSview which is a graphical viewer/front end to Ghostscript. The latest version (4.7) with Ghostscript 7.07+ work very nicely together allow you to convert PS to PDF, as well as view and convert EPS, PS and PDF files among other tools. Version 4.3 is the first version to really work well under Linux (it was originally developed on another operating system). More details are in <a href="gsview.html">GSview and Scribus</a>.</p>
<p><strong>Kpdf 3.4+ / Xpdf </strong> The most recent Kpdf in KDE 3.4 shows me the the developers "get it". Based on Xpdf 3.x it has many nice touches and seems to be a pretty fast renderer. I say this not as a KDE fanboy, but based on using quite a bit in comparison to the larger Adobe Readers. One other note, look through Settings and enable the performance options, if you have the required memory. Enabling them makes a big difference. You still might want Xpdf 3.00+ from Foolabs as includes some command line tools for converting PDFs to PS. To get embedded fonts in all PDFs, not just Scribus, you should read the Xpdf man page about setting up the fonts paths correctly via the .xpdfrc file. Otherwise, embedded fonts may not display properly. One known limitation is the inability to display transparency in Scribus generated PDFs.</p>
<p><strong>Kpdf 3.4+ / Xpdf </strong> The most recent Kpdf in KDE 3.4 shows me the the developers "get it". Based on Xpdf 3.x it has many nice touches and seems to be a pretty fast renderer. I say this not as a KDE fanboy, but based on using quite a bit in comparison to the larger Adobe Readers. One other note, look through Settings and enable the performance options, if you have the required memory. Enabling them makes a big difference. You still might want Xpdf 3.00+ from Foolabs, as includes some command line tools for converting PDFs to PS. To display properly embedded fonts with Xpdf in all PDFs, not just Scribus ones, you should read the Xpdf man page about setting up the fonts paths correctly via the .xpdfrc file. Otherwise, embedded fonts may not display properly. One known limitation is the inability to display transparency in Scribus generated PDFs.</p>
<p>For a taste of some of the cool PDF tricks Scribus can do, make sure you read through the sample docs located in the samples subdirectory of where the Scribus files are located. Maximize Acrobat Reader, open the file and follow the instructions. Consider it the first "Easter Egg" in Scribus.;)</p>
</qt>
/trunk/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/moncal.html
15,11 → 15,11
<li>A utility ICC2IT8 for working with IT8 targets which are used for profiling scanners</li>
</ul>
 
<p>Here, we are going to focus on creation a monitor profile with <strong>qtmonitorprofiler</strong>. Without, some sort of accurate monitor profiler, you will find it difficult to obtain good results from the other tools. Before starting, you need to find if possible, your monitor manual or a spec sheet from your vendor's website. In addition, you might wish to locate the factory ICC profile, which we will use for comparison purposes later on.</p>
<p>Here, we are going to focus on creation a monitor profile with <strong>qtmonitorprofiler</strong>. Without some sort of accurate monitor profiler, you will find it difficult to obtain good results from the other tools. Before starting, you need to find if possible, your monitor manual or a spec sheet from your vendor's website. In addition, you might wish to locate the factory ICC profile, which we will use for comparison purposes later on.</p>
 
<h4>Installation</h4>
 
<p>It is simple to untar and simply type <code>make</code> in the source directory. This will build all five tools and leave the executables in the root source directory. If you are fussy like me, you can go in an hand edit the make files to taste. There is an option to compile this as a KDE application, but if KDE is in a non standard location, it will not compile in this manner. There is also available a patch availabe which enables correct compiling on Qt 3.x</p>
<p>It is simple to untar and simply type <code>make</code> in the source directory. This will build all five tools and leave the executables in the root source directory. If you are fussy like me, you can go in an hand edit the make files to taste. There is an option to compile this as a KDE application, but if KDE is in a non standard location, it will not compile in this manner. There is also available a patch availabe which enables correct compiling on Qt 3.x. Note: lprof as the package of tools is known is now a separate project. See: http://lprof.sourceforge.net</p>
 
<h4>Preparation</h4>
 
29,7 → 29,7
<li>You should have your monitor on for at least a half hour to stabilize the temperature.</li>
<li>In addition, for optimum results, set your desktop to a neutral gray background without any bitmaps or images. This is one of those times, when all that beautiful eye candy on Xfree is <em>definitely</em> not helpful. The switch to a gray desktop, helps to prevent your eyes from being being fooled by a lack of balance in the colors. My desktop is usually a darkish blue, but for color critical work - back to boring gray.</li>
 
<li>Configure, if possible, for your monitor's color temperature to 6500k through the on-screen controls. Your monitor manual should have directions to set this for your individual monitor.</li>
<li>Configure, if possible, your monitor's color temperature to 6500k through the on-screen controls. Your monitor manual should have directions to set this for your individual monitor.</li>
</ul>
 
<p><b>Explanation:</b> This step, helps to get your monitor to display with a closer match to the standards which are used in color measurement. Typically, most monitors are set at the factory to 9300k, which is too "cold" or bluish to depict colors in a balanced manner. After changing your monitor temperature to 6500k, you might think it has a yellowish cast, but walk away for a few minutes and return. Your eyes will adjust.</p>
48,7 → 48,7
 
<table width="100%"><tr><td align="center"><img src="images/monprof2.png" title="Setting gamma and monitor white space with qtmonitorprofiler." alt="Setting gamma and monitor white space with qtmonitorprofiler."/></td></tr></table>
 
<p>Now that we have switched the monitor temperature to 6500K, set the same in the white point drop down list. Then, unless you know there is a specific reason to over ride the default sRGB, leave this as is. You do not need to name the profile as indicated just yet. Knowledgeable folks in India indicate 7500K is a more common setting for that area. </p>
<p>Now that we have switched the monitor temperature to 6500K, set the same in the white point drop down list. Unless you know there is a specific reason to over ride the default sRGB, leave this as is. You do not need to name the profile as indicated just yet. Knowledgeable folks in India indicate 7500K is a more common setting for that area. </p>
 
<p>Next adjust the slider to adjust the gamma so the two shades of gray blend together with the closest color match possible. Most IBM compatible PC's have a gamma setting between 2.1 and 2.4. Macs are generally 1.8. This the reason it is common to find images on edited on a PC looking darker on a Mac. If you monitor is older, it might have a slight color cast and you can try adjusting the individual color channel settings. Don't overdo it. Slight subtle adjustments are better.</p>
 
64,16 → 64,16
 
<p>The last step is to <strong>click go</strong> and the profiler will create the icm file. This takes but a second or two. Now you can close the profiler for now.</p>
 
<p>Then, copy the profile to the Scribus profiles directory from a console as root: <code># cp ./d650023.icm /usr/local/lib/scribus/profiles/</code> This is the default
directory, your might be different if you installed from a package. You can also set it to a folder in your home directory.</p>
<p>Then, copy the profile to the Scribus profiles directory from a console to $home/.color/icc : <code># cp ./d650023.icm $home/.color/icc</code> This is one the default directories Scribus will search for profiles.
</p>
 
<p>Now Scribus can use this profile for more accurately managing screen previews. Start or restart Scribus and go <strong>Settings &gt; Color Management</strong>. Enable color management and select the monitor profile as below:</p>
 
<table width="100%"><tr><td align="center"><img src="images/scribuscms1.png" title="Scribus CMS settings for the monitor profile" alt="Scribus CMS settings for the monitor profile"/></td></tr></table>
 
<p>By setting this monitor profile to be the default, you have enhanced the accuracy of your screen previews. You can selectively enable the gamut checking in your previews, but this is not quite perfected in littlecms. This is not a weakness is littlecms nor Scribus, but a limitation of the current icc specs. When enabling this consider the preview a warning - not definitive. The true test is what actually will print.</p>
<p>By setting this monitor profile to be the default, you have enhanced the accuracy of your screen previews. You can selectively enable the gamut checking in your previews, but this is not quite perfected in littlecms. This is not a weakness in littlecms nor Scribus, but a limitation of the current icc specs. When enabling this consider the preview a warning - not definitive. The true test is what actually will print.</p>
 
<p>You can also use this profile to enhance the previews in Corel Photopaint or other image editing programs like Photoshop which are color management savvy. Monitor colors and brightness vary over time, so re-profiling at least once every couple of months is a good idea. In professional settings, sometimes they are re-profiled every week.</p>
<p>You can also use this profile to enhance the previews in Cinepaint, GIMP or other image editing programs which are color management savvy. Monitor colors and brightness vary over time, so re-profiling at least once every couple of months is a good idea. In professional settings, sometimes they are re-profiled every week.</p>
 
<p><strong>Note:</strong> The latest beta profilers for littlecms adds new features, including support for profiling digital cameras and additional enhancements. However, it is a Windows only program. Fortunately, it includes the updated lcms 1.14 and it installs and runs fine under any recent version of Wine.</p>
<p><strong>Note:</strong> The latest beta profilers from littlecms adds new features, including support for profiling digital cameras and additional enhancements. However, it is a Windows only program. Fortunately, it includes the updated lcms 1.14 and it installs and runs fine under any recent version of Wine.</p>
</qt>
/trunk/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/cups.html
11,7 → 11,7
<li><strong>cups-calibrate</strong> is a command line program you can run as root to calibrate the printer. This only works with the gimp-print drivers - not other CUPS drivers. This is a step by step procedure which in some cases can improve the sharpness of your prints.</li>
<li>CUPS also has an <strong>escputil</strong> command line utility for cleaning the heads etc. Simply type: <strong>escputil -help</strong> for options. This is for Epson printers only.</li>
</ul>
<p>Image below shows the difference in having the GIMP-Print Plug-in.</p>
<p>The image below shows the difference with the GIMP-Print Plug-in installed.</p>
<table width="100%"><tr><td align="center"><img align="center" alt="Cups Control Panel in Scribus With Gimp-Print" src="images/cups2.png" /></td></tr></table>
<p>The main difference is the more refined color adjustments and color space adjustments available in GIMP Print. It is slower than other drivers, but the output quality is the main reason. You can also use kprinter in combination with other programs which are not CUPS aware, but can benefit from high quality printing. As an example, Acrobat Reader on Linux does not recognize CUPS, but has a command line window to call kprinter. Thus, you can print high resolution PDF's with the same high quality as Scribus.</p>
<p>What I recommend with CUPS is to set up your everyday printer with the ijs or regular kprinter driver and then add a second printer instance with GIMP Print, so you have quicker output with everyday docs like text files etc..</p>