Subversion Repositories Scribus

Compare Revisions

Ignore whitespace Rev 3349 → Rev 3350

/branches/Version13x/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/scripter1.html
2,29 → 2,25
<title>Scripting Scribus with Python</title>
<h2>Scripting Scribus with Python</h2>
 
<h4>Abstract</h4>
<p>This is the description how to use the Scripting Plugin for Scribus. This Plugin allows you to use the powerful Python Language as a Scripting Language in Scribus.</p>
<h4>Overview</h4>
<p>This is the description how to use the Scripting Plugin for Scribus. The scripter allows you to use the powerful Python Language as a scripting language in Scribus. This can allow you to automate otherwise repetitive tasks among other features. </p>
 
<p>This manual is the first version, by no means complete or fully accurate. There are just a couple of commands written in red letters aren't yet implemented yet in this version.</p>
<p>This manual is the first version, by no means complete or fully accurate. Addtions to the scripter are made frequently, so a short note to the mailing list is in order ifyou have questions.</p>
 
<p>There are some simple example scripts in the samples subdirectory where Scribus is installed. If you have created scripts which would be useful for other users, please feel free to contribute a copy to the program author, Franz Schmid. Hopefully, in the near future, a Scribus plug-in gallery will be added.</p>
<p>There are some simple example scripts in the samples subdirectory where Scribus is installed. If you have created scripts which would be useful for other users, please feel free to upload it to www.scribus.net or mail mrdocs at scribus.info with an attachment. We hope to add a plug-in gallery to the main website in the future. </p>
 
<h3>Using the Plugin</h3>
 
<table width="100%"><tr><td align="center"><img src="images/Scripter.png" align="center" alt="Running a script" title="Running a script" /></td></tr></table>
 
<p>To execute a Python Script select "Script-&gt;Execute Script..." Scribus will display a File select Box which allows you to select a Python Script. Below there is an extra Menu item "Recent Scripts" where all your recent Scripts are remembered. How many Scripts are remembered depends on your Setting for Recent Documents in the Scribus Preferences.</p>
<p>To execute a Python Script select "Script-&gt;Execute Script..." Scribus will display a File select Box which allows you to select a Python Script. Below that, there is a menu item "Recent Scripts" where the most recently run scripts are listed. The number listed depends on your preferences setting. </p>
 
<p>You can use many Python Programs with this Plugin. The only exception are Scripts who expect Parameters from the Command Line. They won't work because the Plugin gives the Python Interpreter an empty Command Line.</p>
<p>You can use many Python modules with this Plugin. The only exception are scripts who expect parameters from the command Line. They won't work because the plugin gives the Python interpreter an empty command line.</p>
 
<p>The Menu Item "Show Console" gives you an interactive Python Console, where you can execute Commands directly. There is no need to do a "from scribus import *", this has already been done. You can use all the following Commands in the Scripter API section directly without any Prefix. Scribus Python console is quite different from Python console itself. It takes some useful things from well known development tools.</p>
<p>The nenu item "Show Console" gives you an interactive Python console, where you can execute commands directly. There is no need to do a "from scribus import *", this has already been done. You can use all the following commands in the Scripter API section directly without any prefix.</p>
 
<p>The console window id divided into two parts. First part, the code editor, is simple programming text editor. You can here load and save your scripts or files with some unrelated commands. You can run all commands at once by "Script/Run" menu item (or just press "F9" key) but you can select only a piece of the text so then will be only selected commands processed. The second way can be used for simple debugging of the large scripts. You can have e.g. file with small pieces of the frequently used commands (e.g. a loop with eleven text boxes creation) then you can quickly "select and run" without any writting.</p>
<p>You can findsome useful information about any script calling "Script-&gt;About Script...".</p>
 
<p>Second part of the console is the output window. It is a container of the output of your commands or scripts. Text in this window is erased everytime you run new command but you can save actual content by "Script/Save Output...".</p>
<p>You can display the full Scripter reference manual when you select "Help-&gt;Scripter Manual...".</p>
 
<p>You can get some useful informations about any script calling "Script-&gt;About Script...".</p>
 
<p>You can display this Reference Manual when you select "Help-&gt;Scripter Manual...".</p>
 
</qt>
/branches/Version13x/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/toolbox6.html
9,9 → 9,9
<p>For use with Scribus, GSview has the following features:</p>
<ul>
<li>With the help of <a href="http://pstoedit.net">pstoedit</a>, you can convert bitmap images or PDF content back into SVG and other scalable vector file formats.</li>
<li>The ability to preview, convert and add previews (Tiff recommended) for raw EPS (Encapsulated Postscript Files). This is done using <a href="http://www.cs.wisc.edu/~ghost/gsview/epstool.htm">Epstool</a> from the same author. Epstool can also fix EPS files with incorrect or missing bounding boxes. This is a separate tool to be installed and works as a plugin like pstoedit.</li>
<li>The ability to preview, convert and add previews (Tiff recommended) for raw EPS (Encapsulated PostScript Files). This is done using <a href="http://www.cs.wisc.edu/~ghost/gsview/epstool.htm">Epstool</a> from the same author. Epstool can also fix EPS files with incorrect or missing bounding boxes. This is a separate tool to be installed and works as a plugin like pstoedit.</li>
<li>The ability to extract text from a PDF.</li>
<li>The ability to preview, convert and add previews for raw Postscript files. An easy to use interface for creating PDF's in applications without the high level of export capabilities of Scribus. (You are still recommended to use the Export to PDF Scribus, as it is optimized for Scribus files.)</li>
<li>The ability to preview, convert and add previews for raw PostScript files. An easy to use interface for creating PDF's in applications without the high level of export capabilities of Scribus. (You are still recommended to use the Export to PDF Scribus, as it is optimized for Scribus files.)</li>
<li>As an easy to use front end to Ghostscript's less well known features such as image conversion and re-sampling. The example below uses the <strong>epswrite</strong> &quot;device&quot;. There are others in Ghostscript including: converting between TIFF formats, changing the color depth of at TIFF, JPEG or the color space of an image.</li>
</ul>
<p>One example where I use GSview with Scribus is for troubleshooting/fixing EPS files which do not display correctly within Scribus. Although many applications can generate EPS files, some add their own quirks into the EPS, which can cause problems when used in other applications (like Scribus).</p>
/branches/Version13x/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/print1.html
1,7 → 1,7
<qt>
<title>Printing in Depth</title>
<h2>Printing in Depth</h2>
<p>One of the challenges of an advanced DTP application like Scribus, is the ability to generate what I refer to as "high-level" PostScript or PDF features. By <em>high level</em>, this is meant to describe things like transparency, blends, masks and gradients, usually created by professional grade DTP applications and illustration programs. <strong>Always</strong> make sure you have the newest updated version of CUPS and Ghostscript available for your distribution. Newer versions of CUPS and Ghostscript are much better at supporting the kinds of high level PS3 and PDF features Scribus can create.</p>
<p>One of the challenges of an advanced DTP application like Scribus, is the ability to generate what I refer to as "high-level" postscript or PDF features. By <em>high level</em>, this is meant to describe things like transparency, blends, masks and gradients, usually created by professional grade DTP applications and illustration programs. <strong>Always</strong> make sure you have the newest updated versions of CUPS and Ghostscript available for your distribution. Newer versions of CUPS and Ghostscript are much better at supporting the kinds of high level PS3 and PDF features Scribus can create.</p>
<h3>Basic Options:</h3>
<ul>
<li>Print to your default printer with the defaults set either by kprinter, CUPS or Lprng, depending on your specific installation. You can also specify printing in gray scale, as well as reverse the order of printing, which makes the pages stack in correct order on many ink jet printers.</li>
10,13 → 10,13
 
<h3>Advanced Options:</h3>
<ul>
<li>&#034;Print&#034; a separation as shown below. This enables you to create a 4 color separation of the CMYK inks used in process printing. Each of the inks will print on a separate page. This can also be saved to a PostScript file for later processing.</li>
<li>&#034;Print&#034; a separation as shown below. This enables you to create a 4 color separation of the CMYK inks used in process printing. Each of the inks will print on a separate page. This can also be saved to a postscript file for later processing.</li>
</ul>
<table width="100%"><tr><td align="center"><img src="images/printseps.png" alt="Printing Separations from Scribus" title="Printing Separations from Scribus" /></td></tr></table>
 
<ul>
<li>&#034;Print&#034; a PostScript file, which can be later &#034;distilled&#034; or transferred for processing by a printer or service bureau.</li>
<li>If you have the <strong>Gimp Print</strong> modules, selecting Options will bring up a panel similar to the one below. The exact contents will vary with the capabilities of the printer - one very good reason for having CUPS-Gimp Print. These modules are much less &quot;generic&quot; than many other printer drivers. When installed correctly they enable you to use all the options you printer is capable of handling such as different paper type, duplex modes, color printing modes etc. Scribus directly supports <strong>Gimp-Print</strong> drivers with CUPS, These high quality drivers are optimized for printing high resolution prints from ink-jet printers. The specific details are here: <a href="cups.html">CUPS and Gimp-Print</a>.</li>
<li>&#034;Print&#034; a postscript file, which can be later &#034;distilled&#034; or transferred for processing by a printer or service bureau.</li>
<li>If you have the <strong>Gimp Print</strong> modules, selecting Options will bring up a panel similar to the one below. The exact contents will vary with the capabilities of the printer - one very good reason for having CUPS-Gimp Print. These modules are much less &quot;generic&quot; than many other printer drivers. When installed correctly, they enable you to use all the options your printer is capable of handling such as: different paper types, duplex modes, color printing modes etc. Scribus directly supports <strong>Gimp-Print</strong> drivers with CUPS, These high quality drivers are optimized for printing high resolution prints from ink-jet printers. The specific details are here: <a href="cups.html">CUPS and Gimp-Print</a>.</li>
</ul>
<table width="100%"><tr><td align="center"><img src="images/printer1.png" alt="Setup Printer Dialog" title="Advanced CUPS Options in Scribus"/></td></tr></table>
 
/branches/Version13x/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/irc.html
12,7 → 12,7
<h4>Give Details</h4>
<p>It helps to know more than, "Something broke and now blah does not work." </p>
<ul>
<li>Start by saying which platform you are on and what version of Qt, is always helpful.</li>
<li>Start by saying which platform you are on and what version of Qt, knowing this immediately is always helpful. Some issues are platform or distribution specific.</li>
<li>Describe your problem in a way which makes it easy for others to answer. </li>
<li>Be prepared to answer specific questions about which versions of applications are installed.</li></ul>
 
/branches/Version13x/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/pdfx3.html
1,7 → 1,7
<qt>
<title>Scribus PDF/X-3 Information</title>
<h2>Scribus PDF/X-3 Information</h2>
<p>Support for PDF/X-3 is a major milestone in the development of Scribus. Scribus was the first DTP application to support a demanding, but open ISO standard: ISO 15930-3:2002. This type of support for high quality PDF creation has been, until now, available only in expensive proprietary applications. Moreover, creating &#034;press ready&#034; Creating commercial press ready PDFs has historically been fraught with errors, especially for users unfamiliar with the nuances of PostScript, PDF distilling and varying capabilities of image-setters. The saying &#034;It is hard to create a good PDF, but really easy to mess up&#034;, has a great deal of truth. The more common usage of the Adobe Acrobat Distiller family of applications for PDF creation has typically needed knowledge of at least some of the close to 100 Distiller parameters.</p>
<p>Support for PDF/X-3 is a major milestone in the development of Scribus. Scribus was the first DTP application to support a demanding, but open ISO standard: ISO 15930-3:2002. This type of support for high quality PDF creation has been, until now, available only in expensive proprietary applications. Moreover, creating &#034;press ready&#034; Creating commercial press ready PDFs has historically been fraught with errors, especially for users unfamiliar with the nuances of postscript, PDF distilling and varying capabilities of image-setters. The saying &#034;It is hard to create a good PDF, but really easy to mess up&#034;, has a great deal of truth. The more common usage of the Adobe Acrobat Distiller family of applications for PDF creation has typically needed knowledge of at least some of the close to 100 Distiller parameters.</p>
<p>In European countries the concept of PDF/X has been more widely accepted than in North America. Much of the push for these standards has come primarily from Germany and German pre-press companies, a worldwide leader in press and high end digital imaging technology.</p>
<p>The creation of PDF/X, currently with 3 defined ISO standards, is in part, an attempt to provide end users and creators with a vendor neutral measuring stick to vet files as suitable for professional printing or exchange with service bureaus. Scribus now has easy to understand and use options which enable end users to create 100% PDF/X-3 compliant files. By judicious use of PDF options, end users can be assured their files, if they require, too be 100% standards compliant. As always, be certain any PDFs you create can be used in the work-flow of your printer or pre-press service bureau. Not all are equipped to handle the latest in PDF technology. The latest Prinergy and Harlequin image-setting work-flows are capable of supporting PDF/X-3</p>
<p><strong>Warning: all images should be in RGB, not CMYK before importing. Otherwise, unwanted color shifts may appear.</strong></p>
25,7 → 25,7
 
<h3>How has Scribus been able to do this?</h3>
<ul>
<li>The PDF Exporter within Scribus is now in its seventh generation. By carefully refining the code both PDF output and color management for maximum quality output, Scribus created PDFs can be used with confidence for output to service bureaus that can use a PDF work-flow. Many magazines,newspapers and other publications now prefer PDF/X for advertiser created files for example. See the notes in <a href="prepress.html">Scribus and Pre-Press Considerations</a>.</li>
<li>The PDF Exporter within Scribus is now in its seventh generation. By carefully refining the code both PDF output and color management for maximum quality output, Scribus created PDFs can be used with confidence for output to service bureaus that can use a PDF work-flow. Many magazines, newspapers and other publications now prefer PDF/X for advertiser created files for example. See the notes in <a href="prepress.html">Scribus and Pre-Press Considerations</a>.</li>
<li>Credit must be given to Marti Maria for creating and actively maintaining <strong>little cms</strong> which is the color management system which Scribus uses. littlecms is not a end user application per se, but gives Scribus the color management tools, which were previously only available in proprietary systems.</li>
</ul>
 
37,7 → 37,7
 
<h3>What are the differences between PDF-X versions?</h3>
<p>In brief, <strong>PDF/X-1a</strong> requires the following: The color space to be CMYK/greyscale, all the fonts are embedded and the PDF indicates whether it is either pre-trapped = true or not-trapped = false. Think of this as a blind hand-off, as there is no certainty of how it will output.</p>
<p><strong>PDF/X-2</strong> is a looser standard - but with the requirement for more knowledge between the supplier and receiver of the file. Fonts are not required to embedded and it is possible to use OPI (Open Press Initiative). PDF/X-2 also allows device dependent color spaces, like CieLab, to be used.</p>
<p><strong>PDF/X-2</strong> is a looser standard - but with the requirement for more knowledge between the supplier and receiver of the file. Fonts are not required to embedded and it is possible to use OPI (Open Press Initiative). PDF/X-2 also allows device in dependent color spaces, like CieLab, to be used.</p>
<p><strong>PDF/X-3</strong> allows for ICC color profiles to be resident in the PDF, as well as different output intents and 'DeviceN' (spot color) color space - now supported in the AFPL version of Ghostscript 8.0+. This also allows overprinting colors.</p>
 
<h3>How do I test and really certify Scribus PDF files are truly PDF/X-3 compliant?</h3>
/branches/Version13x/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/pdfexport3.html
12,7 → 12,7
<li>Choose the lowest quality setting for compression which has acceptable on-screen viewing results.</li>
<li>You can often substitute Arial for Helvetica, as later viewers will often have this as an included font.</li>
<li>Avoid importing EPS or PDFs into your document - instead convert them to PNG with GSview, then place in your Scribus document. Why? They will render faster on your screen and often make for a smaller file size.</li>
<li>Avoid using the Nimbus fonts, if they are not at least sub-set. Acrobat Reader on other platforms does a poor job of substitution using its included fonts. One other issue which can trip you up is Helvetica is often alised to Nimbus Sans L on many distros.</li>
<li>Avoid using the Nimbus fonts, if they are not at least sub-set. Acrobat Reader on other platforms does a poor job of substitution using its included fonts. One other issue which can trip you up is Helvetica is often alaised to Nimbus Sans L on many distros.</li>
<li>Unless transparency in artwork is needed, select PDF 1.3 output for the greatest compatibility with other users.</li>
</ul>
</qt>
/branches/Version13x/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/cms4.html
4,7 → 4,7
<h4>PDF/X-3 and Color Management</h4>
<p>Above, we covered the basics of getting color management working and configured properly. Now, let's consider using PDF/X-3 to optimize our output for commercial printing. PDF/X-3 is the latest and most advanced ISO standard for PDF files and Scribus fully supports it, as well as being the first DTP app to be able to directly export PDF/X-3 conforming files.</p>
 
<p>The principal benefit of PDF/X-3 is the typically more accurate color conversion from RGB to a printer's CMYK output. The accuracy come from working in RGB colors until the very late in the printing process when the printer's own RIP does the RGB >CMYK conversion. The downside is only the latest and most updated RIPs support PDF/X-3, although others may support earlier PDF/X-x standards. As the RIP engine has detailed knowledge of the exact color range and capabilities, it is thought to offer, in most cases, a more accurate conversion. PDF/X-3 does not preclude using CMYK images, but is ideal for maintaining your colors in RGB as long as possible in the process. </p>
<p>The principal benefit of PDF/X-3 is the typically more accurate color conversion from RGB to a printer's CMYK output. The accuracy comes from working in RGB colors until the very late in the printing process when the printer's own RIP does the RGB >CMYK conversion. The downside is only the latest and most updated RIPs support PDF/X-3, although others may support earlier PDF/X-x standards. As the RIP engine has detailed knowledge of the exact color range and capabilities, it is thought to offer, in most cases, a more accurate conversion. PDF/X-3 does not preclude using CMYK images, but is ideal for maintaining your colors in RGB as long as possible in the process. </p>
<p>The major downside to working in PDF/X-3 are twofold: You cannot use transparency natively. PDF/X-3 is based on PDF-1.3, which does not support transparency. The second is the limited, but growing number of printers who can support it. If in doubt, inquire. My testing show very reliable results with a minimum of color shifting. </p>
<p></p>
<p>The other issue is which printer profile should I use. There are two strategies: The first is to have an actual ICC profile from your print for the matching paper type. The second is to use a well-known printing standard as SWOP, ECI or others. Using PDF/X-3 requires cooperation from your printer, but can really improve your print color matching. As always, a short visit to your printer <strong>in advance</strong> is strongly recommended. If answers are not forthcoming, try another one. Printing is a competitive business and alternatives almost always can be found.
/branches/Version13x/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/toolbox3.html
4,7 → 4,7
 
<p>Batik is actually a collection of Apache XML modules for on the fly export/conversion of SVG. One of the really useful tools in the collection is <strong>Squiggle</strong>, a Java application for simply viewing SVG. From my experience, this is a difficult application to compile on some distributions, so hopefully its packaged for you. </p>
 
<p>Why bother? Call it the sober judge of SVG. Of all of the SVG viewers, it is probably one of, if not the, most spec compliant viewers. If you receive or create an SVG and it won't import properly, see how it views with Batik. If it does not display properly it is more than likely an issue with the creating application. The exception to this is SVG exported from Adobe Illustrator, which often has Adobe only extensions included in the SVG file, thus only viewable in Adobe SVG viewers or applications. As the saying goes, your mileage may vary.</p>
<p>Why bother? Call it the sober judge of SVG. Of all of the SVG viewers, it is probably one of, if not, the most spec compliant viewers. If you receive or create an SVG and it won't import properly, see how it views with Batik. If it does not display properly it is more than likely an issue with the creating application. The exception to this is SVG exported from Adobe Illustrator, which often has Adobe only extensions included in the SVG file, thus only viewable in Adobe SVG viewers or applications. As the saying goes, your mileage may vary.</p>
 
<table width="100%"><tr><td align="center"><img src="images/batik1.png" alt="Batik" /></td></tr></table>
</qt>
/branches/Version13x/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/pdflavor.html
11,15 → 11,15
<li>PDF 1.2 = Acrobat 3.0 - relatively obsolete now
</li>
<li>PDF 1.3 = Acrobat 4.0 - The first version of PDF which truly had all the needed features to support "press-ready" PDF's including color management, ICC profiles etc. It also added javascript, interactive and multimedia capabilities. This standard is probably the safest to send if you are unsure of the capabilities of the receiver of your file. PDF/X-3 and a number of commercial print work flows are based on PDF 1.3.</li>
<li>PDF 1.4 = Acrobat 5.0 - Actually, introduced with Illustrator 9, The main difference to concern Scribus users is both transparency and alpha transparency capabilites. This makes a major difference in where a PDF with these features can be printed. It takes either the latest commercial RIPs or certain Level 3 Postscript printers to use these features properly. Moreover, not all Level 3 Postscript printers will handle transparency. The latest versions of Ghostscript support the advanced PDF 1.4 features Scribus can create when exporting PDF.<strong>The most distinguishing feature of PDF 1.4 for Scribus is the ability to export true transparency in PDF. </strong>Note: Often, the only way you will be able to print exactly the transparency features viewed on-screen is to export PDF 1.4 and print from Acrobat Reader 5.x or newer. </li>
<li>PDF 1.5 = Acrobat 6.0 - Among the most interesting for Scribus users: many improvements for "press-ready" PDF, the capability to have true layering within the PDF, PDF-X "pre-flight" capability, more security and interactive features, like the ability to add comments which are separate from the original doc. Scribus can support many PDF 1.5 features in the 1.3.x development version. PDF 1.5 can also support more sophisticated compression options for images. </li>
<li>PDF 1.6 = Acrobat 7.0 - Refinements of the 1.5 features and more extensive use of PKI and digital signing for document control as well as extended commenting for group collaboration. Where it concerns Scribus, nothing of importance, except the release of Adobe Reader 7.0 for Linux. </li>
<li>PDF 1.4 = Acrobat 5.0 - Actually, introduced with Illustrator 9. The main difference to concern Scribus users is both transparency and alpha transparency capabilites. This makes a major difference in where a PDF with these features can be printed. It takes either the latest commercial RIPs or certain Level 3 PostScript printers to use these features properly. Moreover, not all Level 3 PostScript printers will handle transparency. The latest versions of Ghostscript support the advanced PDF 1.4 features Scribus can create when exporting PDF.<strong>The most distinguishing feature of PDF 1.4 for Scribus is the ability to export true transparency in PDF. </strong>Note: Often, the only way you will be able to print exactly the transparency features viewed on-screen is to export PDF 1.4 and print from Acrobat Reader 5.x or newer. </li>
<li>PDF 1.5 = Acrobat 6.0 - Among the most interesting for Scribus users: many improvements for "press-ready" PDF, the capability to have true layering within the PDF, PDF-X "pre-flight" capability, more security and interactive features, like the ability to add comments which are separate from the original doc. Scribus can support many PDF 1.5 features in the 1.3.x development version. PDF 1.5 can also support more sophisticated compression options for images using JPEG 2000. </li>
<li>PDF 1.6 = Acrobat 7.0 - Refinements of the 1.5 features and more extensive use of PKI and digital signing for document control as well as extended commenting for group collaboration. Where it concerns Scribus, nothing of importance, except the release of Adobe Reader 7.0 for Linux. </li>
</ul>
<p>In deciding which version you choose for export, you need to consider the following: </p>
<ul>
<li><strong>Where am I ultimately printing ?</strong> - If you are planning to have your files printed commercially, always try to ask the printer first.</li>
<li><strong>Does my document have transparency features ?</strong> - See above and ensure the rest of your equipment or workflow can support PDF 1.4. </li>
<li><strong>I am exporting PDF forms. How do I know end receivers of my file can use it ?</strong> - Do you know the version of Acro Reader your users will have ? One </li>
<li><strong>I am exporting PDF forms. How do I know end receivers of my file can use it ?</strong> - Do you know the version of Acro Reader your users will have ? The safest is to use PDF 1.3 or 1.4.</li>
<li><strong>Do I need layers ?</strong> - Only PDF 1.5 supports this and only in the 1.3.x version of Scribus. Be aware support for PDF 1.5 is not complete in most open source viewers. Ghostscript 8.5x does support some, but not all PDF 1.5 features. </li>
</ul>
<p></p>
/branches/Version13x/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/fonts5.html
4,7 → 4,7
<h2>Basic Fonts Tests - Part 2</h2>
<h4>A second quality check for fonts.</h4>
<p>Included with Scribus is a wonderful and very powerful example of what the python scripter in Scribus can do. The font sampler script, written by Steve Callcott, is a tool to create a a nicely laid out catalog of your existing font, which you can print and bind, as well as make a PDF for reference. It also happens to make it easy to spot broken fonts or fonts which are missing needed glyphs which might pose a problem when printing, especially high end or commercial printing.</p>
<p>Included with Scribus is a wonderful and very powerful example of what the python scripter in Scribus can do. The font sampler script, written by Steve Callcott, is a tool to create a nicely laid out catalog of your existing font, which you can print and bind, as well as make a PDF for reference. It also happens to make it easy to spot broken fonts or fonts which are missing needed glyphs which might pose a problem when printing, especially high end or commercial printing.</p>
 
<table width="100%"><tr><td align="center"><img src="images/fontsampler.png" alt="Font Sampler with all fonts selected" title="Font Sampler with all fonts selected"/></td></tr></table>
 
21,7 → 21,7
 
<table width="100%"><tr><td align="center"><img src="images/Scripter.png" alt="Launching the Font Sampler" "title="Launching the Font Sampler"/></td></tr></table>
 
<p>Now, depending on the number of fonts, kinds of fonts and speed/memory of your machine, it might take a while for the script to run. Approximately, 700 plus fonts on a P4 might will take a few minutes, but also remember the script is not only scanning all your fonts, but also automagically adding pages and laying them out too. If memory is short or you have lots of fonts, in the order of 1000 plus,you might want to split the job in parts.</p>
<p>Now, depending on the number of fonts, kinds of fonts and speed/memory of your machine, it might take a while for the script to run. Approximately, 700 plus fonts on a P4 might will take a few minutes, but also remember the script is not only scanning all your fonts, but also automagically adding pages and laying them out too. If memory is short or you have lots of fonts, in the order of 1000 plus, you might want to split the job in parts.</p>
 
 
 
/branches/Version13x/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/print2.html
1,9 → 1,8
<qt>
<title>Print Previewing</title>
<h2>Print Previewing</h2>
<p>As mentioned in the prior section, one of the challenges of an advanced DTP application like Scribus, is the ability to generate what I refer to as "high-level" PostScript or PDF features. The print previewer in Scribus is quite special, as it does more than just generate a screen dump of your document. Scribus generates its print preview by actually outputting a temporary PS file and then using some of the special "devices" from Ghostscript. Have patience when launching the print preview, Scribus and Ghostscript do a lot of work in the background. Newer GS 8.x versions will have far fewer limits on the kinds of advanced PS which can be displayed. The print previewer also gives you the option to preview the individual inks in CMYK color.</p>
<p>As mentioned in the prior section, one of the challenges of an advanced DTP application like Scribus, is the ability to generate what I refer to as "high-level" postscript or PDF features. The print previewer in Scribus is quite special, as it does more than just generate a screen dump of your document. Scribus generates its print preview by actually outputting a temporary PS file and then using some of the special "devices" from Ghostscript. Have patience when launching the print preview, Scribus and Ghostscript do a lot of work in the background. Newer GS 8.x versions will have far fewer limits on the kinds of advanced PS which can be displayed. The print previewer also gives you the option to preview the individual inks in CMYK color.</p>
<p>The print previewer can help you to identify images and artwork, which may have difficulty printing directly on your particular printing setup. This often depends on the capabilities of your printing system, along with the types of advanced features included in your documents. The types of features which can be troublesome with some printing setups include gradients, transparency and complex masking to name a few. The print previewer also can help to give you an idea of color shifts which might occur when printing in CMYK mode.</p>
<p><strong>Note:</strong> Because the print previewer is based on on PS3 (PostScript Level 3), there are some cases where the image on screen can <strong>only</strong> exported via PDF 1.4 or higher, notably transparency and some gradient effects. This again is a case where having a newer Ghostscript is an advantage. </p>
<table width="100%"><tr><td align="center"><img src="images/printpreview.png" align="center" alt="Print Previewer" title="Print Previewer" /></td></tr></table>
<h4>Print Previewer Options</h4>
<p>Most of these options are for advanced CMYK or commercial printing. The first two check boxes are useful for all users.</p>
10,7 → 9,7
<ul>
<li><strong>Anti-Alias Text </strong>- enables/disables previewing text with anti-aliased fonts. This only affects Type 1 fonts and does slow down rendering slightly.</li>
<li><strong>Anti-Alias Graphics</strong> - enables/disables previewing vector graphics, as well as TrueType and OpenType fonts. This does slow down rendering slightly.</li>
<li><strong>Display Transparency </strong>- renders items with transparency enabled with a special GS driver. Note: This function requires GS 7.07 or newer and the <strong>pngalpha</strong> device in GS. Also, this does not show all transparency effects on screen as noted above. It will reliably show masking and clipping paths used for transparent effects. </li>
<li><strong>Display Transparency </strong>- renders items with transparency enabled with a special GS driver. Note: This function requires GS 7.07 or newer and the <strong>pngalpha</strong> device in GS. </li>
<li><strong>Under Color Removal</strong> - This feature enables/disables Under Color Removal, a technique which can improve CMYK printing, especially with media like newspaper or other highly absorbant papers. UCR, for short is used to prevent over saturation of inks in these situations. Normally, for common ink-jet printing this should be disabled.</li>
<li><strong>Display CMYK</strong> - Enabling this option gives you a simulation of generic CMYK inks on the screen. Once enabled, you can selectivly disable/enable any of the C (Cyan), M (Magenta),Y (Yellow) or K (BlacK) ink displays. </li>
</ul>
/branches/Version13x/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/toolbox4.html
9,18 → 9,18
<ul>
<li>Some distributions do not install the "Separate" plug-in which enables you to export CMYK TIFF and duotones. If you want to use duotones, it is recommended.</li>
<li>Make sure you have the latest 2.x.x stable version. There were some important bug fixes made after 2.0.1.</li>
<li>GIMP now can work with CMYK colors. While the color model internally is still RGBplus alpha channels, you can use CMYK measurements and CMYK color definitions. To supplement this, there is a third party plug-in called Separate, which can export CMYK TIFF, using a neat trick with alpha layers. The separate plug-in can also embed ICC profiles into the exported TIFF.</li>
<li>One of the really appreciated improvements is the text handling. GIMP 2.x uses <code>fontconfig</code>, so finding the fonts on your system are much less of an issue. Text can be kept in a separate layer to ease editing and correcting. In the 1.2.x versions certain type of handling were difficult, but there is little to complain about now. It is a pleasure to use the new text controls. In addition, there is also a separate freetype plug-in for GIMP, which allows you to manipulate type in the same means Scribus and Inkscape do. Recommended. You can find this on the ftp.gimp.org site.</li>
<li>The way that pixels are adjusted (interpolated) in filters and effects are applied use Linear as the default. This is a good compromise for speed vs. accuracy. Cubic should almost always be the default for print work, but do expect many operations, (re-scaling, filter application) to run slower. Using Cubic can make sometimes a dramatic difference in the perceived print quality of an image.</li>
<li>GIMP now can work with CMYK colors. While the color model internally is still RGB plus alpha channels, you can use CMYK measurements and CMYK color definitions. To supplement this, there is a third party plug-in called Separate, which can export CMYK TIFF, using a neat trick with alpha layers. The separate plug-in can also embed ICC profiles into the exported TIFF.</li>
<li>One of the really appreciated improvements is the text handling. GIMP 2.x uses <code>fontconfig</code>, so finding the fonts on your system is much less of an issue. Text can be kept in a separate layer to ease editing and correcting. In the 1.2.x versions certain type of handling were difficult, but there is little to complain about now. It is a pleasure to use the new text controls. In addition, there is also a separate freetype plug-in for GIMP, which allows you to manipulate type in the same means Scribus and Inkscape do. Recommended. You can find this on the ftp.gimp.org site.</li>
<li>The way that pixels are adjusted (interpolated) in filters and effects are applied use Linear as the default. This is a good compromise for speed vs. accuracy. <strong>Cubic should almost always be the default for print work</strong>, but do expect many operations, (re-scaling, filter application) to run slower. Using Cubic can make sometimes a dramatic difference in the perceived print quality of an image.</li>
</ul>
 
<table width="100%"><tr><td align="center"><img alt="Cubic Interpolation" src="images/gimpoptions1.png" /></td></tr></table>
 
<p>Like most image editors, GIMP's defaults are setup primarily for web site images, meaning waaaay too little resolution for print. So first thing, set the defaults to a <strong>minimum</strong> of 144 dpi in resolution. Remember using these higher resolutions will result in much larger size files, so you might also need to adjust maximum settings for memory usage as well in GIMP preferences. </p>
<p>Like most image editors, GIMP's defaults are setup primarily for web site images, meaning waaaay too little resolution for print. So first thing, set the defaults to a <strong>minimum</strong> of 144 DPI in resolution. Remember using these higher resolutions will result in much larger size files, so you might also need to adjust maximum settings for memory usage as well in GIMP preferences. </p>
 
<table width="100%"><tr><td align="center"><img alt="DPI Defaults" src="images/gimpoptions3.png" /></td></tr></table>
 
<p>The other notable addition is the beginnings of some very basic color managed “soft proofs” of your images. This is available via littlecms also used by Scribus. Accessing the controls is simple via View > Display Filters. This can be considered experimental at the moment, but expect a more complete color managed view in GIMP 2.4.</p>
<p>The other notable addition is the beginnings of some very basic color managed "soft proofs" of your images. This is available via littlecms also used by Scribus. Accessing the controls is simple via View > Display Filters. This can be considered experimental at the moment, but expect a more complete color managed view in GIMP 2.4. The most recent development 2.3.x versions of GIMP show dramatically more color management capabilities.</p>
 
<table width="100%"><tr><td align="center"><img alt="Display Filter" src="images/gimpoptions2.png" /></td></tr></table>
 
/branches/Version13x/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/toolbox8.html
1,11 → 1,11
<qt>
<title>Imagemagick</title>
<h2>Imagemagick</h2>
<p>Is a command-line image converter processor. While it does have a GUI display called Display, it powerful in three ways:</p>
<p>Is a command-line image converter processor. While it does have a GUI display called Display, it is powerful in three ways:</p>
 
<ul><li>A batch conversion application.</li>
<li>Ability to handle a wide range of image formats.</li>
<li>The newest versions understand color management and use littlecms, just like Scribus.</li></ul>
 
<p>Imagemagick is kind of a black box for image processing, but incredibly powerful when used properly.</p>
<p>Imagemagick is kind of a black box for image processing, but incredibly powerful when used properly. Versions for Linux, Windows and MacOSX are available.</p>
</qt>
/branches/Version13x/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/print3.html
8,11 → 8,12
 
<h4>If they accept PDF, which level ?</h4>
 
<p> PDF 1.3 (Acrobat 4), PDF 1.4 (Acrobat 5) or PDF/X-3 (ISO Standard) ? If they accept PDF/X-3, consider yourself lucky. This type of PDF is the most advanced for commercial printing and is expressly designed to assure good color fidelity between systems. If they can recommend specific ICC profiles to use, then even better.</p>
<p> PDF 1.3 (Acrobat 4), PDF 1.4 (Acrobat 5) or PDF/X-3 (ISO Standard) ? If they accept PDF/X-3, consider yourself lucky. This type of PDF is the most advanced for commercial printing.
PDF/X is expressly designed to assure good color fidelity between systems. If they can recommend specific ICC profiles to use, then even better.</p>
 
<h4>Will they be converting the PDF to other formats like EPS? </h4>
 
<p>Be aware, not all DTP apps are capable of supporting some of the advanced PS3 or PDF 1.4 features Scribus supports. Unless the printer's systems are using PDF 1.4, this is <strong>not</strong> a recommended solution.</p>
<p>Be aware, not all page layout app;ications are capable of supporting some of the advanced PS3 or PDF 1.4 features Scribus supports. Unless the printer's systems are using PDF 1.4, this is <strong>not</strong> a recommended solution.</p>
 
<h4>Can they provide an ICC profile of their printer if color fidelity is critical?</h4>
 
20,7 → 21,7
 
<p>This can be a determining factor in how you prepare the files. If their RIP is 3015.xxx+, you can be sure their RIP can handle 100% of the features of Scribus. They might not be able to directly answer that, but... </p>
 
<p>Consult <a href="prepress.html">The Pre-Press Notes</a> and you can even take a printed copy of the PDF with you if the printer has not heard of Scribus. Soon we will have online a listing of printers who support Scribus.</p>
<p>Consult <a href="prepress.html">The Pre-Press Notes</a> and you can even take a printed copy of the PDF with you if the printer has not heard of Scribus. We have an online a listing of printers who support Scribus. See: <a href="scprinters.html">Scribus Printers</a></p>
 
<p>If there remains unanswered issues, ask on the mailing list or on IRC. Usually, there is someone knowledgable who can answer your questions.</p>
 
/branches/Version13x/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/importhints.html
2,15 → 2,15
<title>Notes on Importing Issues with Scribus</title>
<h2>Notes on Importing Issues with Scribus</h2>
<p>Although Scribus imports most common DTP image formats like TIFF and EPS, over time one of the more difficult tasks in DTP is getting stuff into your layout. Unlike some other DTP programs where printing can be finicky, Scribus print and PDF export has always been very reliable. I can think of
a handful of times when I had crashes or could not get the desired print or PDF from Scribus. With correctly prepared images and files the output from Scribus matches proprietary layout programs.</p>
<p>In my experience, the keys to this are using the right format for the right type of image. Whenever possible, import your images as vector via SVG, EPS or PDF. The other is I am <strong>really</strong> picky about fonts. You will see this noted through the docs; when you are working with high-end DTP tools like Scribus, font quality matters. In professional DTP, it matters <strong>a lot</strong>. Probably the number one reason PostScript output fails, whether to a printer or PDF export, is a dodgy or corrupted font.</p>
a handful of times when I had crashes or could not get the desired print or PDF from Scribus. With correctly prepared images and files, the output from Scribus matches proprietary layout programs.</p>
<p>In my experience, the key to this are using the right format for the right type of image. Whenever possible, import your images as vector via SVG, EPS or PDF. The other is I am <strong>really</strong> picky about fonts. You will see this noted through the docs; when you are working with high-end DTP tools like Scribus, font quality matters. In professional DTP, it matters <strong>a lot</strong>. Probably the number one reason postscript output fails, whether to a printer or PDF export, is a dodgy or corrupted font.</p>
 
<h3>TIFF, JPEG, PNG what is the difference?</h3>
<p>Hints (or) avoiding some issues which can baffle a beginner:</p>
 
<h3>If it looks good on screen it will look good on paper</h3>
<p>Nope, sorry. One of the most common beginner mistakes is to assume a nice looking JPEG from website will print nicely on paper. Most websites use JPEGs, gifs or sadly, less commonly, PNGs. JPEGs, by their design, are lossy compression. In the process of compressing a JPEG, data is discarded and permanently lost. Moreover, there is a type of JPEG called progressive which is pure poison in a PostScript work-flow. A progressive JPEG is the type that partially displays as it is downloading in a web browser. <strong>Avoid these at all costs.</strong> Lastly, remember, most web page graphics have a resolution of 72-96 DPI. Scribus can generate PDFs with 4000 dpi.</p>
<p>For high-level PostScript printing there are three kinds of file formats that work well for images like photos and anything that is made up of pixels and have been time tested: TIFF, tif and Tiff.</p>
<p>Nope, sorry. One of the most common beginner mistakes is to assume a nice looking JPEG from website will print nicely on paper. Most websites use JPEGs, gifs or sadly, less commonly, PNGs. JPEGs, by their design, are lossy compression. In the process of compressing a JPEG, data is discarded and permanently lost. Moreover, there is a type of JPEG called progressive which is pure poison in a postscript work-flow. A progressive JPEG is the type that partially displays as it is downloading in a web browser. <strong>Avoid these at all costs.</strong> Scribus will not load, nor export progressive jpegs. Lastly, remember, most web page graphics have a resolution of 72-96 DPI. Scribus can generate PDFs with 4000 dpi.</p>
<p>For high-level postscript printing there are three kinds of file formats that work well for images like photos and anything that is made up of pixels and have been time tested: TIFF, tif and Tiff.</p>
<p>No matter which way you spell it, a Tagged Image File Format is the file format for bitmap images. Period. End of story. Don't give me any arguments: I'll win.</p>
 
<h3>Why?</h3>
20,7 → 20,7
<li>It handles ICC profiles without problems. You can &#034;tag&#034; it with the little cms utility tifficc or embed an ICC profile in Photoshop, Photopaint and other bitmap editors.</li>
<li>It supports CMYK colors better than almost any other bitmap format.</li>
<li>Every high end DTP application can support them, including Scribus.</li>
<li>TIFF files, if they are prepared properly in the GIMP or Photoshop are extremely reliable when printed commercially and rarely do PostScript devices have problems with them.</li>
<li>TIFF files, if they are prepared properly in the GIMP or Photoshop are extremely reliable when printed commercially. Rarely do postscript devices have problems with them.</li>
</ol>
 
<h3>Caveats</h3>
28,15 → 28,15
<p>Now the exception to that rule is PNG, especially for application screen shots. PNG has a lot of advanced features, like ICC color support and real alpha transparency, which are often not supported well by some applications (a certain leading browser comes to mind). PNG also compresses very well. The only time I prefer Jpeg to PNG is for photos with high dynamic range, mostly for reasons of size on a web page. For creating PDFs with screen shots, PNG is superb and will print well, as long as you do not make any scaling adjustments which reduce the image size. So if you have a screen shot which is typically at 72-96dpi, but you need to shrink it, do so by scaling the image in the GIMP or within Scribus. Whenever you are scaling screen shots disable re-sampling in any image editor. With screen-shots you should never reduce the number of pixels or you will lose sharpness quickly.</p>
 
<h3>If it looks bad on screen, it will print terribly</h3>
<p>EPS files or Encapsulated PostScript files. EPS files natively have no screen preview at all. EPS files are really a special subset of PostScript instructions. They typically look just plain awful on screen if they have a TIFF or PICT preview embedded or are just a simple gray box. EPS have two important virtues: They print well to both high resolution printers or when creating PDFs. EPS files can be resolution independent and are the only file you can (sometimes) safely scale larger than 100% than its native size without degrading image sharpness.</p>
<p>EPS files or Encapsulated PostScript files. EPS files natively have no screen preview at all. EPS files are really a special subset of postscript instructions. They typically look just plain awful on screen if they have a TIFF or PICT preview embedded or are just a simple gray box. EPS have two important virtues: They print well to both high resolution printers or when creating PDFs. EPS files can be resolution independent and are the only file you can (sometimes) safely scale larger than 100% than its native size without degrading image sharpness.</p>
<p>The one issue you might find with EPS files is while a lot of applications can generate EPS files, not all do so with the same fidelity to high-quality printing, nor do all apps follow the EPS specs properly. One way to test an EPS for use with Scribus, is to open the EPS in GSview and look in the message box, by pressing Shift M. This will show the output messages from Ghostscript. Ghostscript is correctly quite fussy about EPS files. So, if you are trying to import EPS files and they do not work properly in Scribus and GSview/Ghostscript is spitting lots of error messages, try using a different application to generate them.</p>
<p>One reason for the ubiquity of EPS files in DTP is there is another DTP application which historically had poor support for TIFF and other bitmap image files, but does have good support for EPS import. So, many DTP users habitually create EPS files from bitmap images from Photoshop or others. Unfortunately, this can have the side effect of receiving image files which may need adjustment, but without the original image file - impossible. EPS is ideal for receiving vector artwork like maps, mixed with text. The caveat is the fonts should be embedded in the EPS properly
to print properly from Scribus.</p>
<p>Fortunately, Scribus automatically creates a low resolution preview image which is handy for placing and adjusting sizing on the page. When importing an EPS, Scribus generates a 72dpi PNG preview of the EPS, so do not be concerned if it does not look sharp right away. Printing or exporting a PDF will generate the high resolution image in the file.</p>
<p>Skeptical about the difference between a vector and a bitmap image file ? Here is an example that you can see for yourself. Go to: <a href="http://www.isc.tamu.edu/~lewing/linux">http://www.isc.tamu.edu/~lewing/linux</a></p>
<p>Get the linked PostScript, which is an EPS version of Tux and then right click and download one of the gifs. They are about the same in file size. Now create a new doc in Scribus with 2 regular size pages. Place the gif on one page and then the eps file on another. Export a PDF at 600+dpi.
<p>Get the linked postscript, which is an EPS version of Tux and then right click and download one of the gifs. They are about the same in file size. Now create a new doc in Scribus with 2 regular size pages. Place the gif on one page and then the eps file on another. Export a PDF at 600+dpi.
Open in Acro Reader. Zoom in 200-400 %. Now you see the difference...</p>
<p>Why the difference? Scribus creates and Acrobat Reader renders something called PostScript operators - another fancy name for using math in drawing curves on screen and when printed. A gif, or JPEG is just a bunch of pixels, literally dots to create the image.</p>
<p>Why the difference? Scribus creates and Acrobat Reader renders something called postscript operators - another fancy name for using math in drawing curves on screen and when printed. A gif, or JPEG is just a bunch of pixels, literally dots to create the image.</p>
 
<h3>My New Favorite File Format</h3>
<p>With the recent addition of SVG import, this gives users one more excellent way of importing images and artwork. SVG - Scalable Vector Graphics. Scalable is great because well it is scalable, meaning you can in theory enlarge the the graphic to the size of the side of a house and it would retain its sharpness. Vector is how it does it, vectors meaning the shapes are drawn by mathematical commands to greatly simplify. More on the next page on some neat importing tricks.</p>
43,7 → 43,7
 
<h3>Think About Fonts When Importing Too</h3>
<p>A similar issue is the fonts look good on screen, but do not print well. Usually, this is the case of freeware TrueType fonts, downloaded from the web. TrueType fonts, on average will look better on screen, but may not print with the intended results. However, it takes a huge amount of time and QA to create high-quality fonts, especially correctly hinting TrueType fonts. Notice that there are very few high-quality fonts which have been developed in open source. There are a few, but sadly not with the regularity which we see new apps pop up on Freshmeat.</p>
<p>Conversely, the Type 1 fonts included with Ghostscript are not optimized for on-screen appearance, but they usually make excellent printer fonts. The fonts actually were made by URW++, a well regarded type foundry and were donated to the Ghostscript distribution by Artifex. The only issue is when the Nimbus fonts - their true PostScript name are often aliased to Times, Helvetica and Courier. This results in a user thinking it is not necessary to embed these fonts as they come standard with Acrobat Reader. Unfortunately, if they are not embedded Acro Reader does a particularly
<p>Conversely, the Type 1 fonts included with Ghostscript are not optimized for on-screen appearance, but they usually make excellent printer fonts. The fonts actually were made by URW++, a well regarded type foundry and were donated to the Ghostscript distribution by Artifex. The only issue is when the Nimbus fonts - their true postscript names are often aliased to Times, Helvetica and Courier. This results in a user thinking it is not necessary to embed these fonts as they come standard with Acrobat Reader. Unfortunately, if they are not embedded Acro Reader does a particularly
poor job of emulating these with its built-in multi-master fonts. With Scribus, you will not have this worry, as Scribus uses the correct PostScript name embedded in the font.</p>
<p>The Bitstream fonts included with Xfree86 like Charter and the new Vera fonts are fine fonts for printing. I also like the Utopia family which is actually an Adobe Type 1 font donated by IBM. When creating Scribus docs in PDF form, I pretty much use this family exclusively.</p>
</qt>
/branches/Version13x/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/pdfexport1.html
7,13 → 7,13
<p>The power and versatility with the PDF Export in Scribus is one of its notable features. Documenting all its features requires almost a chapter by itself. I encourage you to read this introductory part thoroughly to become familiar with all the PDF features and options, along with viewing some of the PDFs created with Scribus on-line at <a href="http://www.scribus.net">www.scribus.net</a> in the download section.</p>
<p>The platform neutral nature of PDF enables Scribus users to overcome a number of potential barriers to Linux and DTP. Scribus reliably exports high quality, "press-ready" PDF including advanced PDF 1.4 features, ISO compliant PDF/X-3 and ICC color managed PDFs, thanks to <a href="http://www.littlecms.com">little cms</a>. If your printer is skeptical, point them to <a href="prepress.html">Scribus Pre Press</a>. This is a downloadable PDF which outlines pre-press tests on Scribus, along with other supplementary info.</p>
<p>If Scribus only created high resolution commercial grade PDFs, that alone would make Scribus a great application. The bonus is all the easy to use versatility such as: creating presentations &#225; la Powerpoint or creating web-enabled PDF interactive forms which can be used with electronic document exchange, the ability to use JavaScript to control elements within the PDF. Scribus provides other user friendly touches like annotations, bookmarks and optionally, document security, if needed.</p>
<p>While PDF in one sense is a proprietary standard, it is also widely available on most every computing platform. It is also extremely well documented. The PDF 1.5 reference manual is a <em>mere</em> 1100 pages. The PDF abilities in Scribus enables for <strong>repurposing</strong> a document. One document can be produced for printing, web download or for presentation like StarOffice Impress or MS Power point. That this is a future trend in publishing is indicated by the same strategy in Adobe's InDesign 2.0+ and the new PDF capabilities in Quark Xpress 6 and Adobe Illustrator 10+. In electronic publishing and pre-press production, both have seen many enhancements to PDF, which often overcome the limitations of HTML and traditional PostScript, respectively.</p>
<p>Your best viewing / printing results will be with the newest version of Acrobat Reader 5.0.8 for Linux and version 6.0+ on other platforms, where it is available. Testing has shown the Linux version is missing some functionality in the JavaScript capabilities of Version 4.05 and 5.0.8 on Linux. Some of these bugs are not present in Acrobat Reader 5.0.5+ on the Mac or Win32.</p>
<p>One of the challenges with PDF and EPS viewers on Linux, is that Scribus creates high end PS level 3 and PDF 1.4, with capabilities beyond most of the open source viewers. Some of these features are only supported in commercial pre-press or DTP tools. Two plus years of working with Scribus has led me to the current conclusion that the following three viewers are the most reliable at displaying PS/EPS/PDF created by Scribus:</p>
<p>While PDF in one sense is a proprietary standard, it is also widely available on most every computing platform. It is also extremely well documented. The PDF 1.5 reference manual is a <em>mere</em> 1100 pages. The PDF abilities in Scribus enables for <strong>repurposing</strong> a document. One document can be produced for printing, web download or for presentation like StarOffice Impress or MS Power point. That this is a future trend in publishing is indicated by the same strategy in Adobe's InDesign 2.0+ and the new PDF capabilities in Quark Xpress 6 and Adobe Illustrator 10+. In electronic publishing and pre-press production, both have seen many enhancements to PDF, which often overcome the limitations of HTML and traditional postscript, respectively.</p>
<p>Your best viewing / printing results will be with the newest version of Acrobat Reader 5.0.10 or Adobe Reader 7.0.1 for Linux and version 6.0+ on other platforms, where it is available. Please also note, <strong>gv and derivatives are not suitable viewers</strong> for Scribus EPS or PDFs. Similarly, Adobe Reader on MacOSX is given preference over the built-in Preview app.</p>
<p>One of the challenges with PDF and EPS viewers on Linux, is that Scribus creates high end PS level 3 and PDF 1.4, with capabilities beyond most of the open source viewers. Some of these features are only supported in commercial pre-press or DTP tools. Moreover, none of the open source viewers are capable of correctly interpreting color managed PDF. Two plus years of working with Scribus has led me to the current conclusion that the following three viewers are the most reliable at displaying PS/EPS/PDF created by Scribus:</p>
<ul>
<li><strong>Adobe Reader 5.0.8+ for Linux</strong> - The best and sometimes the only choice for PDF viewing. Detailed notes and hints: <a href="toolbox1.html">Adobe Reader</a>.</li>
<li><strong>GSview 4.7+</strong> - with the latest version of Ghostscript available. This combination is your best choice for viewing EPS files, PS files and most PDFs. In addition, GSview has many other very useful capabilities with add-ons like <code>pstoedit</code> and <code>epstool</code>. For more detailed notes and hints: <a href="toolbox6.html">GSview</a>. I consider it an essential tool for DTP on Linux.</li>
<li><strong>Kpdf 3.4+</strong> - This updated PDF viewer from KDE 3.4has a new rendering engine and is capable of viewing PDF 1.5 files.</li>
<li><strong>Kpdf 3.4+</strong> - This updated PDF viewer from KDE 3.4 has a new rendering engine and is capable of viewing PDF 1.5 files.</li>
</ul>
<p><strong>If any other PDF or EPS viewer you choose cannot display PDFs from Scribus, but they do view properly in Acrobat Reader, file a bug with the upstream author. In virtually all cases I have tested, it is a limitation of the viewing application. Scribus PDFs are tested daily with specialist pre-press software to validate their adherence to the published PDF specifications.</strong></p>
</qt>
/branches/Version13x/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/gsfont.html
2,7 → 2,7
 
<em>These notes thanks to Craig Ringer and Russell Lang, maintainer of GSview.</em>
 
<p>One of the most common causes of Ghostscript failure to render/import/convert a file is when Ghostscript can't find the fonts it needs to either display an EPS or PS. This not a weakness or flaw in Ghostscript, as <strong>all</strong> EPS/PS interpreters need to be able access the correct fonts listed within the Postscript. This can most definitely affect EPS/PS files you are trying to import into Scribus. Some applications do not properly embed the fonts, so they must be supplied externally. </p>
<p>One of the most common causes of Ghostscript failure to render/import/convert a file is when Ghostscript can't find the fonts it needs to either display an EPS or PS. This not a weakness or flaw in Ghostscript, as <strong>all</strong> EPS/PS interpreters need to be able access the correct fonts listed within the PostScript. This can most definitely affect EPS/PS files you are trying to import into Scribus. Some applications do not properly embed the fonts, so they must be supplied externally. </p>
 
<p>When Ghostcript can't find a font usually an error message from the console will be something like:</p>
 
/branches/Version13x/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/cms2.html
21,16 → 21,14
 
<p><strong>Monitor Gamma</strong> - Gamma simply put is a number which represents the brightness of neutrals or grays. Having Gamma accurately setup is an important first step in getting good color balance before trying to creating an accurate profile. The monitor profiler from littlecms is well designed to help you set this correctly.</p>
 
<p>The next step is in accuracy is a custom generated profile created with profiling software, like the ones in the the littlecms profile constructor set. <a href="moncal.html">See the instructions for profiling your monitor for details.</a> It was interesting to see how similar the profile was to one created with professional pre-press color calibration software and a hardware tool under Windows 2000.</p>
<p>The next level in accuracy is a custom generated profile created with profiling software, like the ones in the the littlecms profile constructor set. <a href="moncal.html">See the instructions for profiling your monitor for details.</a> It was interesting to see how similar the profile was to one created with professional pre-press color calibration software and a hardware tool under Windows 2000.</p>
 
<p>The most precise way to profile a monitor is with a electronic profiling device, basically a very special type of camera which measures color. The software sends known reference colors to the monitor which then read the output to the profiling device and creates a profile. Linux drivers for common "<strong>spiders</strong>" or colorimeters are not yet available, but the profiler can use hardware when device drivers are written. Users who have created custom profiles with a "spider" under Windows, might have try using this same profile if the monitor is set up exactly as in Windows AND if the Linux video driver does not make any radical adjustments to the color values of your display. It is worth trying at least! My "spider" created monitor profile works very well with Scribus. With color management activated, the colors within Scribus are just about exactly the same in Photoshop 6.0. Quite an achievement by both Scribus and littlecms!</p>
 
<p><strong>Scribus Color Management Settings</strong></p>
 
<p><strong>System Profiles -</strong> These drop down boxes show the available profiles on your system. To enable Scribus to use profiles, they should be copied to the <pre>$prefix/share/Scribus/profiles</pre> directory or you can put them somewhere in your home directory and point to this directory in your preferences.. Color profiles, .icm and .icc, are platform independent, thus files created or available for a Mac or Windows are usable in Linux with littlecms in Scribus, as well. See the links page for more info where to obtain profiles. I highly recommend having the Adobe profiles which are shown on the links page if you plan to do an type of cross platform or commercial printing, as most well set up DTP workstations, as well as most commercial printers will be able to work with these profiles.</p>
<table width="100%"><center><img src="images/colormgmtscreen.png" title="Color Managment Options" alt="Color Management Options"/></center></td></tr></table>
 
<p><strong>System Profiles -</strong> These drop down boxes show the available profiles on your system. To enable Scribus to use profiles, they should be copied to the <pre>$prefix/share/Scribus/profiles</pre> directory or you can put them somewhere in your home directory and point to this directory in your preferences.. Color profiles, .icm and .icc, are platform independent, thus files created or available for a Mac or Windows are usable in Linux with littlecms in Scribus, as well. See the links page for more info where to obtain profiles. I highly recommend having the Adobe profiles which are shown on the links page if you plan to do an type of cross platform or commercial printing, as most well set up DTP workstations, as well as most commercial printers will be able to work with these profiles.</p>
 
<p>The above screen cap is a good starting point to explain the important parts of littlecms in Scribus. In this case, the images in the document have been created with a mid-range digital camera. The camera's itself performs come automatic color balancing and auto adjusts the output for the sRGB range or <strong>color space</strong>. So, leaving this within sRGB is a good choice. If the images came from a scanner, you would want to select the profile created with scanner profiling software.</p>
 
<p>Solid colors can be described within <strong>RGB</strong>
/branches/Version13x/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/toolbox1.html
7,7 → 7,7
 
<p> Moreover, while PDF is a published standard, Adobe invented PostScript on which PDF is based and has a commercial incentive to promote PDF on all platforms.</p>
<h3>Hints for Scribus users:</h3>
<p><strong>We highly recommend upgrading to the latest Adobe Reader 7. </strong>Simply put, there is nothing else more capable of rendering PDF correctly. Whatever your objections were to older versions (and there were some substantial ones), this latest version 7 amelorates the vast majority of them. It is far more stable, bug free and now has a modern look and feel. <strong>Any PDF rendering issues with Scribus exported PDF in other viewers should be cross-checked with Reader 7 before reporting bugs to us. </strong>We are aware of one color mismatch with RGB images and transparency in PDF 1.4. Yes, this has been duly reported as a bug to Adobe too.</p> <p><strong>Details:</strong> As soon there is an extended graphics state parameter dictionary present which contains any transparency related setting AcroReader switches into CMYK mode showing no incorrect colours. My local printer confirmed this strange behaviour even with files not generated by scribus, its clearly a bug from Adobe.</p>
<p><strong>We highly recommend upgrading to the latest Adobe Reader 7. </strong>Simply put, there is nothing else more capable of rendering PDF correctly. Whatever your objections were to older versions (and there were some substantial ones), this latest version 7 amelorates the vast majority of them. It is far more stable, bug free and now has a modern look and feel. <strong>Any PDF rendering issues with Scribus exported PDF in other viewers should be cross-checked with Reader 7 before reporting bugs to us. </strong>We are aware of one color mismatch with RGB images and transparency in PDF 1.4. Yes, this has been duly reported as a bug to Adobe too.</p> <p><strong>Details:</strong> As soon there is an extended graphics state parameter dictionary present which contains any transparency related setting, AcroReader switches into CMYK mode showing incorrect colours. My local printer confirmed this strange behaviour even with files not generated by scribus, its clearly a bug from Adobe.</p>
<h3>Tweaking the Viewer Preferences</h3>
 
<p>Right away, getting the preferences right in Reader is important to ensure the default preferences to set improve the reliability for our purposes with Scribus. There are a many preferences in Reader 7. The page display part is the most important. </p>
/branches/Version13x/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/toolbox5.html
4,7 → 4,7
 
<p>For those not familiar, Ghostscript strictly defined is a PostScript interpreter and many programs use GS for PostScript conversions and import/export. Likewise, Scribus uses Ghostscript, sometimes using some of the most advanced features available only in newer versions. </p>
 
<p>With regard to Scribus, there are two major issues: Ghostscript is a kind of black box command line tool with, sometimes obscure or difficult to understand switches. Accessing many of these is made much easier with GSview, noted later. The other is there have been some major improvements in the 8.x versions, especially with advanced PS3, PDF 1.4 features and high end printing features. The next section outlines a possible way to upgrade to the latest version, without breaking your existing CUPS/Foomatic/GIMP print setup.</p>
<p>With regard to Scribus, there are two major issues: Ghostscript is a kind of black box command line tool with sometimes obscure or difficult to understand switches. Accessing many of these is made much easier with GSview, noted later. The other is there have been some major improvements in the 8.x versions, especially with advanced PS3, PDF 1.4 features and high end printing features. The next section outlines a possible way to upgrade to the latest version, without breaking your existing CUPS/Foomatic/GIMP print setup.</p>
 
<p>While Ghostscript originates from a commercial company and is dual licensed, the Ghostscript developers are very OSS friendly and have been very helpful to the Scribus team, especially with documentation and learning some of the more esoteric features. Ghostscript is one of core building blocks of OSS software. It would be hard to imagine OSS software without it.</p>
 
/branches/Version13x/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/fonts3.html
10,19 → 10,19
<li>Indic Scripts are a much more difficult task, however, we have strong interest in supporting them. One developer has been working with Scribus developers to modify the display canvas to fully support the special features needed to display and print them properly.</li>
<li>Glyph combining in these languages is not supported (yet).</li>
<li>Scribus supports both Unicode TrueType fonts and OpenType Fonts, even if you export PDF 1.3.</li>
<li>Exported EPS or Postscript works fine with most CJK or Unicode fonts.</li>
<li>Exported EPS or PostScript works fine with most CJK or Unicode fonts.</li>
<li>Cyrillic works perfectly and Scribus has active translators for Russian and Ukrainian.</li>
</ul>
<h4>Hints: </h4>
<ul>
<li>To reduce the size of your exported PDF and Postscript files either:
<li>To reduce the size of your exported PDF and postscript files either:
<ol>
<li>Convert all fonts in text frames to Postscript outlines. </li>
<li>Convert all fonts in text frames to postscript outlines. </li>
<li>Enable sub-setting of any Unicode or CJK TrueType font in Settings > Fonts.</li>
</ol>
</li>
<li>When viewing in Acrobat Reader, enable the preference for smooth artwork display. See the <a href="toolbox1.html">Acrobat Reader section</a>.</li>
<li>If you are exporting to SVG, conversion of text to Postscript outlines is almost always more satisfactory.</li>
<li>If you are exporting to SVG, conversion of text to postscript outlines is almost always more satisfactory.</li>
<li>Some Unicode fonts are quite large and will slow launching Scribus significantly. You should expect higher memory usage as well. Scribus does some very needed sanity checks on fonts upon loading.</li>
</ul>
</qt>
</qt>
/branches/Version13x/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/pdf_form.html
2,9 → 2,9
<title>How To Create Your First PDF Web Form with Scribus</title>
<h2>How To Create Your First PDF Web Form with Scribus</h2>
<p><em><strong>With many thanks to Maciej Hanski</strong>, who kindly translated this from the Polish original, licenced under the FDL.</em></p>
<p><strong>The sample files, <code>scribusformphp.tar.gz</code>, a tarball of php file and sample doc, are available from http://docs.scribus.net</a></p>
<p><strong>The sample files, <code>scribusformphp.tar.gz</code>, a tarball of a php file and a sample doc, are available from http://docs.scribus.net</a></p>
 
<p>One of the biggest advantages of Scribus is the possibility to create PDF forms with embedded JavaScript scripts (in Adobe's own version, as described in the Adobe Javascript Reference at http://partners.adobe.com/asn/developer/pdfs/tn/5186AcroJS.pdf</p>
<p>One of the biggest advantages of Scribus is the possibility to create PDF forms with embedded JavaScript scripts (in Adobe's own version, as described in the Adobe JavaScript Reference at http://partners.adobe.com/asn/developer/pdfs/tn/5186AcroJS.pdf</p>
 
<p>Its rather simple to create a new form with Scribus. We start with clicking on the "New Document" icon or choosing <strong>New</strong> from the <strong>File</strong> menu.</p>
 
/branches/Version13x/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/about2.html
1,9 → 1,9
<qt>
<title>Scribus Basics</title>
<h2>Scribus Basics</h2>
<h3>Why DTP is different from Word Processing</h3>
<h3>Why Page Layout is different from Word Processing</h3>
 
<p>What can you do with Scribus? What is a &quot;page layout&quot; program? Among other types of docs, you can create PDF documents like this one.</p>
<p>What can you do with Scribus? What is a &quot;page layout&quot; program ? </p>
<p>Fundamentally, Scribus is <strong>not a word processor</strong>. This is a very important concept to understand. Scribus belongs to the family of applications known as page layout programs or more commonly known as Desktop Publishing programs. Scribus gives users great flexibility in placing objects like images, logos etc. in the exact place where you want them. This short guide is meant to give a first time user a sense of what Scribus can do. It is not meant to cover every feature, just a simple over view to get you started and being productive.</p>
 
<p>With Scribus you can:</p>
15,14 → 15,14
<li>Import photos and other artwork with high fidelity printing and precise color control.</li>
</ul>
<h4>First the Theory - The Right Approach</h4>
<p>First time users of DTP applications like Scribus can be very frustrated at first. The interface seems approachable and familiar enough, but when you start out things do not quite work as expected. Do not make the mistake of launching Scribus, opening a new document and expect to start typing. Making the most of an application like Scribus, requires a bit of understanding of the concepts within &quot;workflow&quot; in the DTP world. It might seem a bit arcane at first, but will pay off in the end.</p>
<p>First time users of page layout applications like Scribus can be very frustrated at first. The interface seems approachable and familiar enough, but when you start out things do not quite work as expected. Do not make the mistake of launching Scribus, opening a new document and expect to start typing. Making the most of an application like Scribus, requires a bit of understanding of the concepts within &quot;workflow&quot; in the DTP world. It might seem a bit arcane at first, but will pay off in the end.</p>
<p>Part of the challenge of learning Scribus is you are often not just trying to learn a program, but learning DTP, which has its own little rules. There are subtle differences from word processors or other text editors. Fortunately, Scribus comes with its own built-in story editor. Using this instead of editing on the canvas, understanding the setup and application of styles will greatly enhance your productivity, as well as providing you with more consistent, easier to edit documents.</p>
<p><i>Workflow</i>, means in the DTP world a way of assembling both the files to be used, but also some forethought on where and how your document will be printed or used. If for example, you were planning on creating a brochure for your business, you certainly would want to have it commercially printed. Thus, you would be sadly mistaken if you thought you could take the low resolution JPEG from your website and use them in Scribus directly. Web and print have two different objectives. <b><i>Graphics used on a website are almost always unusable for commercial printing.</i></b> You need <b>much</b> higher resolution graphics. File size should almost always be secondary to image quality when considering commercial print needs. A typical website image is 72-96 DPI , where for good print results, you need 200-300 DPI. Scribus can export PDF at <em>4000</em> DPI</p>
<p><i>Workflow</i>, means in the page layout world a way of assembling both the files to be used, but also some forethought on where and how your document will be printed or used. If for example, you were planning on creating a brochure for your business, you certainly would want to have it commercially printed. Thus, you would be sadly mistaken if you thought you could take the low resolution JPEG from your website and use them in Scribus directly. Web and print have two different objectives. <b><i>Graphics used on a website are almost always unusable for commercial printing.</i></b> You need <b>much</b> higher resolution graphics. File size should almost always be secondary to image quality when considering commercial print needs. A typical website image is 72-96 DPI , where for good print results, you need 200-300 DPI. Scribus can export PDF at <em>4000</em> DPI</p>
<p>A Simple DTP Workflow:</p>
<ol>
<li>Make a simple sketch on paper of the basic layout.. This helps to visualize how to mix text, artwork and images.</li>
<li>Get images collected as needed, preferably high 200DPI or more saved as TIFFs or PNG. Get your artwork (illustrations or line art in a suitable import format. SVG is usually the best option.</li>
<li>Write out the text in a word processor or text editor. Spell check, double check grammar etc.</li>
<li>Get images collected as needed, preferably high 200 DPI or more saved as TIFFs or PNG. Get your artwork (illustrations or line art in a suitable import format. SVG is usually the best option.</li>
<li>Write out the text in a word processor or text editor. Spell check, double check grammar, etc.</li>
<li>Collect all these files in a project directory and start building your document in Scribus.</li>
</ol>
<p>In a commercial setting, this might be far more complex. In my experience, using similar methods will allow the planning and structure to the planning and structure make sense and greatly enhances productivity.</p>
31,12 → 31,12
<p>For first time users, I would encourage you to launch Scribus while looking through some of the latter parts of the documentation, especially some of the sections on more advanced topics. Read everything once thoroughly. Make notes on what you do not understand, then post your questions to the mailing list or IRC.</p>
<p>Before diving into a project, sometimes the best thing is to put the computer aside, get out a sketch pad and make a simple drawing how you want the doc to appear. I too have rediscovered pen and paper. On a recent vacation, lacking a computer at times, I discovered my lack of writing by hand has lead to very poor penmanship. Results, I wrote 8 complete pages in an afternoon, more than I might write in three nights. Why? Because, I could only concentrate on content. I suggest you do the same. Scribus's real magic is the ability to assemble all the bits <i>at the end</i> to create your masterpiece.
</p>
<p>So, if text is going to be a big part of your document, start your favorite text editor or word processor and compose the text first. This way you can concentrate on content. This is where word processors sometimes work against you... Note how often you can be distracted by editing done to affect the look, instead of the content. (I'm guilty too.) I need not preach to the choir and explain the benefits of saving plain unformatted text. This, in the Unix/Linux world is a given, but for migrating Windows/Mac users may not be the usual habit. Save plain text, you will be happy about this some day. Alternatively, you can import Open Office.org 1.x and 2.x (OASIS) text and drawings.</p>
<p>So, if text is going to be a big part of your document, start your favorite text editor or word processor and compose the text first. This way you can concentrate on content. This is where word processors sometimes work against you... Note how often you can be distracted by editing done to affect the look, instead of the content. (I'm guilty too.) I need not preach to the choir and explain the benefits of saving plain unformatted text. This, in the Unix/Linux world is a given, but for migrating Windows/Mac users may not be the usual habit. Save plain text, you will be happy about this some day. Alternatively, you can import OpenOffice.org.org 1.x and 2.x (OASIS) text and drawings.</p>
<p>Next, you will need to consider drawings, photos, tables etc., which might be a part of your doc.</p>
 
<h4>Bitmap Images</h4>
<p>like photos come from the GIMP, Krita, Adobe Photoshop or similar. They could also be images from a digital camera or a scanner application like Xsane or Gphoto. Bitmap images are composed of pixels or dots, typically compressed in a file format like JPEG, TIFF, PNG or bmp. For images in Scribus, I prefer and recommend either PNG for things like screen captures or TIFFs. TIFFs are generally very reliable in DTP and should be chosen of any kind of high resolution photos.</p>
<h4>Vector Drawings or illustrations</h4><p>come from applications like Inkscape, Sodipodi, Adobe Illustrator, Corel Draw, Sketch, or Xfig. These generate line drawings and other artwork which is kept in a vector format in
<h4>Vector Drawings or illustrations</h4><p>come from applications like Inkscape, OpenOffice.org Draw, Adobe Illustrator, Corel Draw, Sketch, or Xfig. These generate line drawings and other artwork which is kept in a vector format in
ways which preserve their appearance at any scale. The preferred way to import them into Scribus is via EPS (Encapsulated Post Script) or via SVG (Scalable Vector Graphics) The advantage of SVG is Scribus imports this into native editable objects and can re-edit almost every features in SVG. The importer can import almost every type of SVG from the W3C test suite, excepting multimedia features and scripted actions for Win32 plug-ins in a browser.</p>
<h4>EPS/PS Importing</h4>
<p>One of the reasons we recommend the latest Ghostscript is to enable the best possibility of importing EPS and PS vector files, which can then be edited natively as Scribus objects. This can be very useful for imports which need further changes and you do not have the original source files. </p>
/branches/Version13x/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/scprinters.html
1,7 → 1,7
<qt>
<title>Scribus Friendly Printers</title>
<h2>Scribus Friendly Printers</h2>
<p>Once you have your masterpiece created, sometimes the next step is getting is commercially printed.</p>
<p>Once you have your masterpiece created, sometimes the next step is getting is your file commercially printed.</p>
<h4>What defines a "Scribus Friendly Printer" ?</h4>
<p>First and foremost the ability to handle PDF directly without conversion to other formats. Conversion for placement into other page layout applications is <strong>not</strong> recommended and may result in reduced print quality. Ideally, a printer can handle a Scribus file natively, but is not a necessity. The most important is the ability to handle correctly newer versions of PDF without further alteration.</p>
<p>This list is by no means comprehensive, but are printers who have been involved in developing Scribus and or have expressed a willingness to handle Scribus files natively or as PDF: </p>
/branches/Version13x/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/pdfexport2.html
12,7 → 12,7
<p><strong>Presentation Effects</strong> - the recommended settings are down-sample all images to 72, 96 or 120 dpi, depending on the resolution of the display screen. Embed all fonts and landscape page layouts will give you maximum image area on the screen if you plan on using a display projector. More hints on Presentation PDFs further on.</p>
</li>
<li>
<p><strong>Press Optimized</strong> - Clear all down-sampling or compression of images where image quality is of utmost importance. All images brought into to Scribus as placed images should be a minimum of 200 dpi and preferably 300 dpi or more for photos or TIFFs. Line art or vector graphics converted to an EPS in a program like Illustrator should have a minimum of 800 dpi for best results. Most vector EPS can be imported directly as native Scribus objects and recommended where possible. <strong>If your printer supports color managed PDF/X-3, This is the recommended method for optimal results. However, only the latest printing technology can support it and you should only enable this when your printer advises. </strong>.</p>
<p><strong>Press Optimized</strong> - Clear all down-sampling or compression of images where image quality is of utmost importance. All images brought into to Scribus as placed images should be a minimum of 200 dpi and preferably 300 dpi or more for photos or TIFFs. Line art or vector graphics converted to an EPS in a program like Illustrator should have a minimum of 800 dpi for best results. Most vector EPS can be imported directly as native Scribus objects and recommended where possible. <strong>If your printer supports color managed PDF/X-3, This is the recommended method for optimal results. However, only the latest printing technology can support PDF/X-3. You should only enable this when your printer advises. </strong>.</p>
</li>
<li>
<p><strong>Print Optimized</strong> - This would mean targeting the PDF for printing on an office laser jet or ink jet. Recommended settings: down-sample all images to 300 dpi or less, embed fonts and keep your page margins with enough tolerance for margin limits on desktop and common office laser printers (approx. 6/10th of an inch or 15cm.)</p>
/branches/Version13x/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/menu.xml
48,8 → 48,8
<!-- <submenuitem text="PDF 1.3 and 1.4" file=".html"/>-->
<submenuitem text="PDF/X-3" file="pdfx3.html"/>
<submenuitem text="PDF Forms" file="pdfexport3.html"/>
<submenuitem text="PDF and JavaScript" file="javascriptpdf.html"/>
<submenuitem text="PDF Forms and PHP" file="pdf_form.html"/>
<submenuitem text="PDF and JavaScript" file="javascriptpdf.html"/>
<submenuitem text="PDF Presentations" file="pdfexport4.html"/>
</submenuitem>
<submenuitem text="Printing" file="print1.html">
/branches/Version13x/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/importhints3.html
2,9 → 2,9
<title>Scribus and OpenOffice.org</title>
<h2>Scribus and OpenOffice.org.org</h2>
<h4>Overview</h4>
<p>The open and XML based file format used by OpenOffice.org in all versions, share some common traits with Scribus, The clear documentation and specs have helped the Scribus Team to create very useful import features. Expect more enhancements in the future. One of the pleasant surprises to see in the OpenOffice.org version 2 beta releases is the improved EPS exporter. The 1.1.x version sometimes had difficulties exporting correctly. The exporter in V 2.x in testing here seems to create better, more conformant files, which Scribus imports with little difficulties. Except for OpenOffice.org Writer files, the magic trick to get high quality imports into Scribus depends on using OO.org Draw. Almost any type of OpenOffice.org file can be imported into Scribus with high fidelity, provided you export from Draw as EPS. Native Draw files can usually be imported directly into Scribus. </p>
<p>The open and XML based file format used by OpenOffice.org in all versions, share some common traits with Scribus. The clear documentation and specs have helped the Scribus Team to create very useful import features. Expect more enhancements in the future. One of the pleasant surprises to see in the OpenOffice.org version 2 beta releases is the improved EPS exporter. The 1.1.x version sometimes had difficulties exporting correctly. The exporter in V 2.x in testing here seems to create better, more conformant files, which Scribus imports with little difficulties. Except for OpenOffice.org Writer files, the magic trick to get high quality imports into Scribus depends on using OO.org Draw. Almost any type of OpenOffice.org file can be imported into Scribus with high fidelity, provided you export from Draw as EPS. Native Draw files can usually be imported directly into Scribus. </p>
<h4>Importing from OpenOffice.org.org Writer</h4>
<p>The singular most important issue to take into consideration for hassle free OO.org Writer import is well chosen usage and correctly applying styles in OO.org. Doing so will greatly reduce the amount of time needed within Scribus formatting and styling text. Any special paragraph styles in your Writer document will automatically be imported into your existing Scribus layout. When importing text from OO.org there are three important options which need to be carefully considered:</p>
<p>The singular most important issue to take into consideration for hassle free OO.org Writer import is well chosen usage and correctly applying styles in OO.org. Doing so will greatly reduce the amount of time needed within Scribus to format and style text. Any special paragraph styles in your Writer document will automatically be imported into your existing Scribus layout. When importing text from OO.org there are three important options which need to be carefully considered:</p>
 
<table width="100%"><tr><td align="center"><img src="images/oogettext1.png" alt="Import Options for OO.org Writer and OASIS (Open Document) files." align="middle" title="Import Options for OO.org Writer and OASIS (Open Document) files." /></td></tr></table>
 
/branches/Version13x/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/cms3.html
22,5 → 22,5
 
<p>When printing, Scribus can optionally apply the printing profile you have chosen in the color management panel. This can be very useful, if you want to simulate a commercial printer profile with your ink-jet printer via CUPS. </p>
 
<p>Postscript Output - This would require having your images tagged before being placed in Scribus files when outputting a Scribus document either: as pure postscript or as individual EPS files. Scribus uses level 3 postscript.Level 2 and Level 3 postscript can read and use icc profiles within an image. Most color postscript devices will read the embedded profiles and use them to render color within the postscript using something called a rendering dictionary.</p>
<p>PostScript Output - This would require having your images tagged before being placed in Scribus files when outputting a Scribus document either: as pure postscript or as individual EPS files. Scribus uses level 3 postscript.Level 2 and Level 3 postscript can read and use icc profiles within an image. Most color postscript devices will read the embedded profiles and use them to render color within the postscript using something called a rendering dictionary.</p>
</qt>
/branches/Version13x/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/scribus-svg.html
1,7 → 1,7
<qt>
<title>Scribus SVG Import/Export</title>
<h2>Scribus SVG Import/Export</h2>
<p>Scribus 1.2.x includes SVG import/export plug-ins, which enables you to export Scribus pages or objects as SVG. The import plug-in allows you to import SVG drawings and documents from illustration programs like Inkscape, Skencil and Adobe Illustrator.</p>
<p>Scribus 1.3.x includes SVG import/export plug-ins, which enables you to export Scribus pages or objects as SVG. The import plug-in allows you to import SVG drawings and documents from illustration programs like Inkscape, Skencil and Adobe Illustrator.</p>
<p>These plug-ins have the capability to import and export SVG 1.0 standards 2D graphics primitives and text, which can then be displayed in web browsers with SVG capability, within SVG viewers or further edited with SVG capable vector editors, like Skencil, Inkscape or Adobe Illustrator.
</p>
<h4>Exporting using the Plug-in:</h4>
11,7 → 11,7
 
<h4>SVG Importing Hints:</h4>
<p>Scribus can handle most of the SVG features which can be created in Inkscape and Sketch, two well known vector drawing programs for Linux. The biggest issue I have observed is sometimes the paths when interpreted do not show up as closed. So parts of the SVG file look empty upon import. The simple fix is to ungroup the elements and then select the empty looking objects, then double click to bring up the editing palette for drawing objects and click on the close path button. Typically, then the invisible object will appear.</p>
<p>I generally avoid creating special text effects in SVG, unless a: It cannot be done in Scribus and Scribus has very versatile text effect tools. b: The text effects are converted to outlines before importation. Why ? Scribus uses a PostScript model for handlingfonts and text, where SVG uses a model much like html. </p>
<p>I generally avoid creating special text effects in SVG, unless a: It cannot be done in Scribus and Scribus has very versatile text effect tools. b: The text effects are converted to outlines before importation. Why ? Scribus uses a postscript model for handling fonts and text, where SVG uses a model much like html. </p>
 
<h3>Scribus - SVG Q and A</h3>
<h4>What is an SVG?</h4>
36,17 → 36,17
<ul>
<li>Easy to implement. The SVG file format is based on XML and has many similarities to Scribus' native file format.</li>
<li>SVG is a scalable vector graphics, so graphics do not become pixellated when zoomed.</li>
<li>They are XML format, text based and quick to load - much smaller than bitmap images. A typical SVG files is under 10k.</li>
<li>They are in XML format, text based and quick to load - much smaller than bitmap images. A typical SVG file is under 10k.</li>
<li>SVG is an open XML-based standard from the W3 consortium</li>
<li>It is platform neutral</li>
<li>Can be scripted for user interaction and control. Also has support for ICC color spaces so color display accurately, even within a browser.</li>
<li>Browser support is increasing. KDE has fairly complete native support for SVG in KDE 3.2+. KSVG will is now part of the kdegraphics package. More details: <a href="http://svg.kde.org/preview_kde32.html">svg.kde.org</a></li>
<li>Browser support is increasing. KDE has fairly complete native support for SVG in KDE 3.2+. KSVG will is now part of the kdegraphics package. More details: <a href="http://svg.kde.org">svg.kde.org</a></li>
<li>SVG can also be color managed and supports a well defined way to specify ICC profiles.</li>
</ul>
 
<h4>What about browser support?</h4>
<p>Mozilla has long had special builds which have native SVG support. Mozilla trunk code is regularly built with SVG support. You can find them on the Mozilla ftp site. Also interesting is the
latest SVG plug-in from Adobe it works well in my testing with Mozilla 1.4+ and in Konqueror.</p>
latest SVG plug-in from Adobe; it works well in my testing with Mozilla 1.4+ and in Konqueror.</p>
<h4>Where can I learn more?</h4>
<p><a href="http://www.svgx.org/">SVG Foundation</a> has a wealth of links and news.</p><p>Other links are listed in the <a href="sclinks.html">Links page</a></p>
<h4>A Scribus page displayed in a browser:</strong></h4>
/branches/Version13x/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/toolbox2.html
2,6 → 2,6
<title>Other PDF Viewers</title>
<h2>Other PDF Viewers</h2>
<p>Another useful PDF viewer to use with Scribus is GSview which is a graphical viewer/front end to Ghostscript. The latest version (4.7) with Ghostscript 7.07+ work very nicely together allow you to convert PS to PDF, as well as view and convert EPS, PS and PDF files among other tools. Version 4.3 is the first version to really work well under Linux (it was originally developed on another operating system). More details are in <a href="gsview.html">GSview and Scribus</a>.</p>
<p><strong>Kpdf 3.4+ / Xpdf </strong> The most recent Kpdf in KDE 3.4 shows me the the developers "get it". Based on Xpdf 3.x it has many nice touches and seems to be a pretty fast renderer. I say this not as a KDE fanboy, but based on using quite a bit in comparison to the larger Adobe Readers. One other note, look through Settings and enable the performance options, if you have the required memory. Enabling them makes a big difference. You still might want Xpdf 3.00+ from Foolabs as includes some command line tools for converting PDFs to PS. To get embedded fonts in all PDFs, not just Scribus, you should read the Xpdf man page about setting up the fonts paths correctly via the .xpdfrc file. Otherwise, embedded fonts may not display properly. One known limitation is the inability to display transparency in Scribus generated PDFs.</p>
<p><strong>Kpdf 3.4+ / Xpdf </strong> The most recent Kpdf in KDE 3.4 shows me the the developers "get it". Based on Xpdf 3.x it has many nice touches and seems to be a pretty fast renderer. I say this not as a KDE fanboy, but based on using quite a bit in comparison to the larger Adobe Readers. One other note, look through Settings and enable the performance options, if you have the required memory. Enabling them makes a big difference. You still might want Xpdf 3.00+ from Foolabs, as includes some command line tools for converting PDFs to PS. To display properly embedded fonts with Xpdf in all PDFs, not just Scribus ones, you should read the Xpdf man page about setting up the fonts paths correctly via the .xpdfrc file. Otherwise, embedded fonts may not display properly. One known limitation is the inability to display transparency in Scribus generated PDFs.</p>
<p>For a taste of some of the cool PDF tricks Scribus can do, make sure you read through the sample docs located in the samples subdirectory of where the Scribus files are located. Maximize Acrobat Reader, open the file and follow the instructions. Consider it the first "Easter Egg" in Scribus.;)</p>
</qt>
/branches/Version13x/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/moncal.html
15,11 → 15,11
<li>A utility ICC2IT8 for working with IT8 targets which are used for profiling scanners</li>
</ul>
 
<p>Here, we are going to focus on creation a monitor profile with <strong>qtmonitorprofiler</strong>. Without, some sort of accurate monitor profiler, you will find it difficult to obtain good results from the other tools. Before starting, you need to find if possible, your monitor manual or a spec sheet from your vendor's website. In addition, you might wish to locate the factory ICC profile, which we will use for comparison purposes later on.</p>
<p>Here, we are going to focus on creation a monitor profile with <strong>qtmonitorprofiler</strong>. Without some sort of accurate monitor profiler, you will find it difficult to obtain good results from the other tools. Before starting, you need to find if possible, your monitor manual or a spec sheet from your vendor's website. In addition, you might wish to locate the factory ICC profile, which we will use for comparison purposes later on.</p>
 
<h4>Installation</h4>
 
<p>It is simple to untar and simply type <code>make</code> in the source directory. This will build all five tools and leave the executables in the root source directory. If you are fussy like me, you can go in an hand edit the make files to taste. There is an option to compile this as a KDE application, but if KDE is in a non standard location, it will not compile in this manner. There is also available a patch availabe which enables correct compiling on Qt 3.x</p>
<p>It is simple to untar and simply type <code>make</code> in the source directory. This will build all five tools and leave the executables in the root source directory. If you are fussy like me, you can go in an hand edit the make files to taste. There is an option to compile this as a KDE application, but if KDE is in a non standard location, it will not compile in this manner. There is also available a patch availabe which enables correct compiling on Qt 3.x. Note: lprof as the package of tools is known is now a separate project. See: http://lprof.sourceforge.net</p>
 
<h4>Preparation</h4>
 
29,7 → 29,7
<li>You should have your monitor on for at least a half hour to stabilize the temperature.</li>
<li>In addition, for optimum results, set your desktop to a neutral gray background without any bitmaps or images. This is one of those times, when all that beautiful eye candy on Xfree is <em>definitely</em> not helpful. The switch to a gray desktop, helps to prevent your eyes from being being fooled by a lack of balance in the colors. My desktop is usually a darkish blue, but for color critical work - back to boring gray.</li>
 
<li>Configure, if possible, for your monitor's color temperature to 6500k through the on-screen controls. Your monitor manual should have directions to set this for your individual monitor.</li>
<li>Configure, if possible, your monitor's color temperature to 6500k through the on-screen controls. Your monitor manual should have directions to set this for your individual monitor.</li>
</ul>
 
<p><b>Explanation:</b> This step, helps to get your monitor to display with a closer match to the standards which are used in color measurement. Typically, most monitors are set at the factory to 9300k, which is too "cold" or bluish to depict colors in a balanced manner. After changing your monitor temperature to 6500k, you might think it has a yellowish cast, but walk away for a few minutes and return. Your eyes will adjust.</p>
48,7 → 48,7
 
<table width="100%"><tr><td align="center"><img src="images/monprof2.png" title="Setting gamma and monitor white space with qtmonitorprofiler." alt="Setting gamma and monitor white space with qtmonitorprofiler."/></td></tr></table>
 
<p>Now that we have switched the monitor temperature to 6500K, set the same in the white point drop down list. Then, unless you know there is a specific reason to over ride the default sRGB, leave this as is. You do not need to name the profile as indicated just yet. Knowledgeable folks in India indicate 7500K is a more common setting for that area. </p>
<p>Now that we have switched the monitor temperature to 6500K, set the same in the white point drop down list. Unless you know there is a specific reason to over ride the default sRGB, leave this as is. You do not need to name the profile as indicated just yet. Knowledgeable folks in India indicate 7500K is a more common setting for that area. </p>
 
<p>Next adjust the slider to adjust the gamma so the two shades of gray blend together with the closest color match possible. Most IBM compatible PC's have a gamma setting between 2.1 and 2.4. Macs are generally 1.8. This the reason it is common to find images on edited on a PC looking darker on a Mac. If you monitor is older, it might have a slight color cast and you can try adjusting the individual color channel settings. Don't overdo it. Slight subtle adjustments are better.</p>
 
64,16 → 64,16
 
<p>The last step is to <strong>click go</strong> and the profiler will create the icm file. This takes but a second or two. Now you can close the profiler for now.</p>
 
<p>Then, copy the profile to the Scribus profiles directory from a console as root: <code># cp ./d650023.icm /usr/local/lib/scribus/profiles/</code> This is the default
directory, your might be different if you installed from a package. You can also set it to a folder in your home directory.</p>
<p>Then, copy the profile to the Scribus profiles directory from a console to $home/.color/icc : <code># cp ./d650023.icm $home/.color/icc</code> This is one the default directories Scribus will search for profiles.
</p>
 
<p>Now Scribus can use this profile for more accurately managing screen previews. Start or restart Scribus and go <strong>Settings &gt; Color Management</strong>. Enable color management and select the monitor profile as below:</p>
 
<table width="100%"><tr><td align="center"><img src="images/scribuscms1.png" title="Scribus CMS settings for the monitor profile" alt="Scribus CMS settings for the monitor profile"/></td></tr></table>
 
<p>By setting this monitor profile to be the default, you have enhanced the accuracy of your screen previews. You can selectively enable the gamut checking in your previews, but this is not quite perfected in littlecms. This is not a weakness is littlecms nor Scribus, but a limitation of the current icc specs. When enabling this consider the preview a warning - not definitive. The true test is what actually will print.</p>
<p>By setting this monitor profile to be the default, you have enhanced the accuracy of your screen previews. You can selectively enable the gamut checking in your previews, but this is not quite perfected in littlecms. This is not a weakness in littlecms nor Scribus, but a limitation of the current icc specs. When enabling this consider the preview a warning - not definitive. The true test is what actually will print.</p>
 
<p>You can also use this profile to enhance the previews in Corel Photopaint or other image editing programs like Photoshop which are color management savvy. Monitor colors and brightness vary over time, so re-profiling at least once every couple of months is a good idea. In professional settings, sometimes they are re-profiled every week.</p>
<p>You can also use this profile to enhance the previews in Cinepaint, GIMP or other image editing programs which are color management savvy. Monitor colors and brightness vary over time, so re-profiling at least once every couple of months is a good idea. In professional settings, sometimes they are re-profiled every week.</p>
 
<p><strong>Note:</strong> The latest beta profilers for littlecms adds new features, including support for profiling digital cameras and additional enhancements. However, it is a Windows only program. Fortunately, it includes the updated lcms 1.14 and it installs and runs fine under any recent version of Wine.</p>
<p><strong>Note:</strong> The latest beta profilers from littlecms adds new features, including support for profiling digital cameras and additional enhancements. However, it is a Windows only program. Fortunately, it includes the updated lcms 1.14 and it installs and runs fine under any recent version of Wine.</p>
</qt>
/branches/Version13x/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/cups.html
11,7 → 11,7
<li><strong>cups-calibrate</strong> is a command line program you can run as root to calibrate the printer. This only works with the gimp-print drivers - not other CUPS drivers. This is a step by step procedure which in some cases can improve the sharpness of your prints.</li>
<li>CUPS also has an <strong>escputil</strong> command line utility for cleaning the heads etc. Simply type: <strong>escputil -help</strong> for options. This is for Epson printers only.</li>
</ul>
<p>Image below shows the difference in having the GIMP-Print Plug-in.</p>
<p>The image below shows the difference with the GIMP-Print Plug-in installed.</p>
<table width="100%"><tr><td align="center"><img align="center" alt="Cups Control Panel in Scribus With Gimp-Print" src="images/cups2.png" /></td></tr></table>
<p>The main difference is the more refined color adjustments and color space adjustments available in GIMP Print. It is slower than other drivers, but the output quality is the main reason. You can also use kprinter in combination with other programs which are not CUPS aware, but can benefit from high quality printing. As an example, Acrobat Reader on Linux does not recognize CUPS, but has a command line window to call kprinter. Thus, you can print high resolution PDF's with the same high quality as Scribus.</p>
<p>What I recommend with CUPS is to set up your everyday printer with the ijs or regular kprinter driver and then add a second printer instance with GIMP Print, so you have quicker output with everyday docs like text files etc..</p>