Subversion Repositories Scribus

Compare Revisions

Ignore whitespace Rev 593 → Rev 594

/trunk/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/scripter1.html
1,3 → 1,5
<qt>
<title>Scripting Scribus with Python</title>
<h2>Scripting Scribus with Python</h2>
 
<h4>Abstract</h4>
9,7 → 11,7
 
<h3>Using the Plugin</h3>
 
<div style="text-align: center"><img src="<?php echo $scr_shots_root; ?>Scripter.png" align="center" alt="Running a script" title="Running a script" /></div>
<table width="100%"><tr><td align="center"><img src="images/Scripter.png" align="center" alt="Running a script" title="Running a script" /></td></tr></table>
 
<p>To execute a Python Script select "Script-&gt;Execute Script..." Scribus will display a File select Box which allows you to select a Python Script. Below there is an extra Menu item "Recent Scripts" where all your recent Scripts are remembered. How many Scripts are remembered depends on your Setting for Recent Documents in the Scribus Preferences.</p>
 
17,4 → 19,5
 
<p>The Menu Item "Show Console" gives you an interactive Python Console, where you can execute Commands directly. There is no need to do a "from scribus import *", this has already been done. You can use all the following Commands in the Scripter API section directly without any Prefix.</p>
 
<p>You can display this Reference Manual when you select "Help-&gt;Scripter Manual...".</p>
<p>You can display this Reference Manual when you select "Help-&gt;Scripter Manual...".</p>
</qt>
/trunk/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/toolbox6.html
1,3 → 1,5
<qt>
<title>GSview - Looking into the black box</title>
<h2>GSview - Looking into the black box</h2>
<p><em>Parts of this section are thanks to Russell Lang, author and maintainer of GSview, epstool and Ghostscript for his hints and patiently answering my questions about GSview and Ghostscript. It has helped the Scribus Team to use some of the more advanced features of Ghostscript to improve certain features of Scribus.</em> </p>
<p>Although Acrobat ReaderĀ® is in my experience sometimes a better pure viewer for PDF, I also consider GSview one of the most essential tools to have when using Scribus. GSview has a handful of extremely useful functions. For those unfamiliar, it provides an easy to use "front end" to Ghostscript, as well as pstoedit for converting bitmaps into vector files. For those coming from the Windows/Mac world, it also has the functionality of Distiller with a graphical front end for those applications which do not export PDF natively.</p>
16,4 → 18,5
<p>One example where I use GSview with Scribus is for troubleshooting/fixing EPS files which do not display correctly within Scribus. Although many applications can generate EPS files, some add their own quirks into the EPS, which can cause problems when used in other applications (like Scribus).</p>
<p>So, if you find difficulty with an EPS or PDF you wish to use in Scribus, open the EPS in GSview. Then, use the key command M to display messages from Ghostscript. The messages can indicate problems which cause display or printing errors. You can also use the epswrite "device" to re-save the EPS, which can help to strip out or fix issues with an EPS. GSview easily allows you access to most all of the Ghostscript drivers and devices.</p>
<p>You can also rasterize an EPS image like this, by converting to PNG or TIFF and then resize, adjust colors etc with an image program like GIMP or Corel Photoshop. I did this with a troublesome EPS and converted it to a 600dpi PNG, which would then display and print perfectly from Scribus. Sometimes when working with images and DTP there are several different ways to accomplish the same task - in my example, it was getting a complex EPS file from Illustrator to display and print properly from Scribus. The fact that there problem displaying the EPS, was not a bug in Scribus, but some non-standard PostScript information in the file, which by using Ghostscript as a back end to GSview I could strip out and then display properly in Scribus.</p>
<p>GSview since about 4.3, has been, in my experience, the most reliable and versatile PDF viewer along with Acrobat Reader on Linux. For DTP with Scribus, I consider it essential.</p>
<p>GSview since about 4.3, has been, in my experience, the most reliable and versatile PDF viewer along with Acrobat Reader on Linux. For DTP with Scribus, I consider it essential.</p>
</qt>
/trunk/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/print1.html
1,3 → 1,5
<qt>
<title>Printing in Depth</title>
<h2>Printing in Depth</h2>
<p>One of the challenges of an advanced DTP application like Scribus, is the ability to generate what I refer to as "high-level" postscript or PDF features. By <em>high level</em>, this is meant to describe things like transparency, blends, masks and gradients, usually created by professional grade DTP applications and illustration programs. <strong>Always</strong> make sure you have the newest updated version of CUPS and Ghostscript available for your distribution. Newer versions of CUPS and Ghostscript are much better at supporting the kinds of high level PS3 and PDF features Scribus can create.</p>
<h3>Basic Options:</h3>
10,21 → 12,22
<ul>
<li>&#034;Print&#034; a separation as shown below. This enables you to create a 4 color separation of the CMYK inks used in process printing. Each of the inks will print on a separate page. This can also be saved to a postscript file for later processing.</li>
</ul>
<div style="text-align: center"><img src="<?php echo $scr_shots_root; ?>printseps.png" alt="Printing Separations from Scribus" title="Printing Separations from Scribus" /></div>
<table width="100%"><tr><td align="center"><img src="images/printseps.png" alt="Printing Separations from Scribus" title="Printing Separations from Scribus" /></td></tr></table>
 
<ul>
<li>&#034;Print&#034; a postscript file, which can be later &#034;distilled&#034; or transferred for processing by a printer or service bureau.</li>
<li>If you have the <strong>Gimp Print</strong> modules, selecting Options will bring up a panel similar to the one below. The exact contents will vary with the capabilities of the printer - one very good reason for having CUPS-Gimp Print. These modules are much less &quot;generic&quot; than many other printer drivers. When installed correctly they enable you to use all the options you printer is capable of handling such as different paper type, duplex modes, color printing modes etc. Scribus directly supports <strong>Gimp-Print</strong> drivers with CUPS, These high quality drivers are optimized for printing high resolution prints from ink-jet printers. The specific details are here: <a href="cups.html">CUPS and Gimp-Print</a>.</li>
</ul>
<div style="text-align: center"><img src="<?php echo $scr_shots_root; ?>printer1.png" alt="Setup Printer Dialog" title="Advanced CUPS Options in Scribus"/></div>
<table width="100%"><tr><td align="center"><img src="images/printer1.png" alt="Setup Printer Dialog" title="Advanced CUPS Options in Scribus"/></td></tr></table>
 
<ul>
<li>&#034;Mirrored&#034; Printing - this option enables you to mirror pages on the printer. This is useful when printing things like card layouts, calendars or brochures to compensate for folds and cuts or when duplexing prints.</li>
</ul>
<div style="text-align: center"><img src="<?php echo $scr_shots_root; ?>printer3.png" alt="Advanced Options Dialog"/></div>
<table width="100%"><tr><td align="center"><img src="images/printer3.png" alt="Advanced Options Dialog"/></td></tr></table>
 
<ul>
<li>Color Managed Printing - When color management is enabled Scribus can apply ICC profiles to the print output. This option can be used to make simple simulations of CMYK press conditions. This can also be used if have special profiles of your printer for special papers like glossy photo paper or specially coated stock paper for color laser printers. More details are found in <a href="cms.html">Scribus and littlecms</a>.</li>
</ul>
 
<div style="text-align: center"><img src="<?php echo $scr_shots_root; ?>printer2.png" alt="Printing with Color Management Enabled" title="Printing with Color Management Enabled" /></div>
<table width="100%"><tr><td align="center"><img src="images/printer2.png" alt="Printing with Color Management Enabled" title="Printing with Color Management Enabled" /></td></tr></table>
</qt>
/trunk/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/specs.html
1,3 → 1,5
<qt>
<title>Scribus Specifications</title>
<h2>Scribus Specifications</h2>
<h3>Summary:</h3>
<p>Scribus is a GPL desktop publishing (DTP) program similar for Linux and Unix-based operating systems. Its goals are to be both user friendly, yet offer advanced professional features.</p>
57,4 → 59,5
<li>Layouts for newsletters, corporate stationery, posters, training manuals, technical documentation, business cards and other documents which need flexible layout and/or sophisticated image handling, as well as precise typography controls and image sizing not available in current word processors.</li>
<li>Users needing the ability to output to professional quality image setting equipment, as well as re-purposing for internal printing, web distributed PDFs or presentations.</li>
<li>Users needing to create interactive PDF forms for presentations and cgi-form submission via PDF.</li>
</ul>
</ul>
</qt>
/trunk/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/translation_howto.html
1,3 → 1,5
<qt>
<title>How to create or update a translation of Scribus</title>
<h2>How to create or update a translation of Scribus</h2>
 
<p>Scribus is available in over 20 languages thanks to the many willing souls out there who have spent the time translating. This is no small task, but to be honest, not a very difficult one technically. This page outlines the requirements and procedures for creating or updating such a translation.</p>
32,4 → 34,5
<li>That's it! When the next CVS release is made, your new translation will be added by the team.</li>
</ol>
 
<p>So that's it really! Enjoy Scribus in your favourite language!</p>
<p>So that's it really! Enjoy Scribus in your favourite language!</p>
</qt>
/trunk/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/cms.html
1,3 → 1,5
<qt>
<title>Color management with Scribus, an Introduction</title>
<h2>Color management with Scribus, an Introduction</h2>
 
<p>The objective of a color management system is to reduce the differences between the on-screen colors and final printing, as well as showing colors which are out of gamut, beyond the color range of your selected printer. The caveat is you need to provide a profile which is reasonably accurate. For users of other applications, the default settings and descriptions can be quite confusing to new users. Without prior knowledge of the terminology, it is <strong>very</strong> easy to choose the wrong settings. This can often makes images look worse on screen or print. Then, the first time user simply says enough and disables color management.</p>
23,7 → 25,7
 
<p><strong>Device Profiles</strong> - are separate files which describe the way a device creates (scanner or digital camera), displays (monitor) or outputs (printer) colors. Users of of Photoshop will be familiar with the choice of <strong>Working Profiles</strong> or <strong>Working Space</strong> - which are color profiles not related to a particular device, but to assist in the conversion of color from one device to another. Well known RGB "working spaces" Include sRGB, Adobe&#174; RGB 1998, Colormatch,Bruce RGB or CIERGB. Users of Photoshop or other color may be wondering if this is a missing feature, but littlecms uses its own internal color conversion process to make the transformation between color spaces. One less setting to worry about!</p>
 
<div style="text-align: center;"><img src="<?php echo $scr_shots_root; ?>cmsmodify1.png" title="Modify Color Management Dialog" alt="Modify Color Management Dialog"></div>
<table width="100%"><tr><td><img src="images/cmsmodify1.png" align="center" title="Modify Color Management Dialog" alt="Modify Color Management Dialog"/></td></tr></table>
 
<p>Why "soft proofing" ? With the proper setup of device profiles, littlecms can adjust the colors of your monitor to more accurately represent how your document will actually look when finally printed., This can be doubly helpful if you are sending it to be printed commercially or for service bureau output. Moreover, each image can be individually modified by Scribus to assign profiles in an image, ( Select image &gt; right click &gt; Modify ) so that it can be properly color managed in document production, such as preparing film, a PDF/X-3 or direct to plate technologies. This does not however, alter the image file internally. Preview profiles <strong>assigned</strong> to an image are part of the setting retained in a Scribus document or in the creation of a PDF. <a href="corelphoto.html">This article</a> explains how to convert color spaces or embed icc profiles using Corel Photopaint 9. There is also a command line tool in littlecms to embed profiles with <strong>tifficc</strong> and <strong>jpegicc</strong>.</p>
 
53,7 → 55,7
 
<p><strong>Scribus Color Management Settings</strong></p>
 
<div style="text-align: center;"><img src="<?php echo $scr_shots_root; ?>colormgmtscreen.png" title="Color Managment Options" alt="Color Managment Options"></div>
<table width="100%"><img src="images/colormgmtscreen.png" align="center" title="Color Managment Options" alt="Color Managment Options"/></td></tr></table>
 
<p><strong>System Profiles -</strong> These drop down boxes show the available profiles on your system. To enable Scribus to use profiles, they should be copied to the /usr/local/share/Scribus/profiles directory. Color profiles, .icm and .icc, are platform independent, thus files created or available for a Mac or Windows are usable in Linux with littlecms in Scribus, as well. See the links page for more info where to obtain profiles. I highly recommend having the Adobe profiles which are shown on the links page if you plan to do an type of cross platform or commercial printing, as most well set up DTP workstations, as well as most commercial printers will be able to work with these profiles.</p>
 
113,3 → 115,5
<p>Acknowledgments:</p>
 
<p>Mart&iacute; Maria; Developer of little cms, without which this would not be possible.</p>
 
</qt>
/trunk/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/pdfx3.html
1,3 → 1,5
<qt>
<title>Scribus PDF/X-3 Information</title>
<h2>Scribus PDF/X-3 Information</h2>
<p>Support for PDF/X-3 is a major milestone in the development of Scribus. Scribus was the first DTP application to support a demanding, but open ISO standard: ISO 15930-3:2002. This type of support for high quality PDF creation has been, until now, available only in expensive proprietary applications. Moreover, creating &#034;press ready&#034; Creating commercial press ready PDFs has historically been fraught with errors, especially for users unfamiliar with the nuances of postscript, PDF distilling and varying capabilities of image-setters. The saying &#034;It is hard to create a good PDF, but really easy to mess up&#034;, has a great deal of truth. The more common usage of the Adobe Acrobat Distiller family of applications for PDF creation has typically needed knowledge of at least some of the close to 100 Distiller parameters.</p>
<p>In European countries the concept of PDF/X has been more widely accepted than in North America. Much of the push for these standards has come primarily from Germany and German pre-press companies, a worldwide leader in press and high end digital imaging technology.</p>
10,12 → 12,12
<li>Select <strong>File &#062; Export...&#062; Save as PDF..</strong> or select the PDF icon from the tool bar.</li>
</ol>
<p>This panel will open first and select <strong>PDF/X-3</strong> in the compatibility drop down as shown below. This will change the default settings, as needed, automatically.</p>
<div style="text-align: center"><img alt="PDF Create Dialog General Tab" src="<?php echo $scr_shots_root; ?>pdfx3-1.png" /></div>
<table width="100%"><tr><td align="center"><img alt="PDF Create Dialog General Tab" src="images/pdfx3-1.png" /></td></tr></table>
<p>Next, select the <strong>Color</strong> tab, as shown below:</p>
<div style="text-align: center"><img alt="PDF Create Dialog Color Tab" src="<?php echo $scr_shots_root; ?>pdfxcolor.png" /></div>
<table width="100%"><tr><td align="center"><img alt="PDF Create Dialog Color Tab" src="images/pdfxcolor.png" /></td></tr></table>
<p>Here is where you select color profile choices to embed in the PDF. By not selecting or embedding an ICC profile for solid colors, CMYK is automatically assigned as the color space.</p>
<p>Next,select the <strong>PDF/X-3</strong> tab, as shown below:</p>
<div style="text-align: center"><img alt="PDF Create Dialog PDF/X-3 Tab" src="<?php echo $scr_shots_root; ?>pdfxoutpint.png" /></div>
<table width="100%"><tr><td align="center"><img alt="PDF Create Dialog PDF/X-3 Tab" src="images/pdfxoutpint.png" /></td></tr></table>
<p>This is where you can adjust the trim box, as well as embed in the PDF the intended press condition, which is defined by the ICC printing profile. This is probably the most important choice in terms of color profiles, as it affects color throughout the whole document. You can also put in a short note about the document, which is useful later on. <strong>This should not be left blank - otherwise - technically it will fail the PDF/X-3 standards.</strong><p>
<p>Note: Because of the exacting standards of PDF/X-3, some PDF features are disabled including encryption, presentation effects and all fonts are automatically embedded. Likewise, annotations and transparency is disabled. You should carefully follow the advice given in <a href="pdfexport1.html">PDF Export Options</a> for file preparation and choice of image formats.</p>
 
42,4 → 44,5
<h3>PDF/X Links:</h3>
<p><a href="http://www.ddap.org/resource_center/article_index.php">http://www.ddap.org/resource_center/article_index.php</a></p>
<p><a href="http://www.ipa.org/PDFS/pdfxguide.zip">http://www.ipa.org/PDFS/pdfxguide.zip</a></p>
<p><a href="http://www.pdf-x.com/downloads/pdf/application_notes_pdfx3.pdf">http://www.pdf-x.com/downloads/pdf/application_notes_pdfx3.pdf</a></p>
<p><a href="http://www.pdf-x.com/downloads/pdf/application_notes_pdfx3.pdf">http://www.pdf-x.com/downloads/pdf/application_notes_pdfx3.pdf</a></p>
</qt>
/trunk/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/toolbox10.html
1,5 → 1,8
<qt>
<title>KSnapshot</title>
<h2>KSnapshot</h2>
 
<p>Following the *nix mentality of one tool for the job, Ksnapshot does one thing really really well: Take screen captures. Even in preferences to the GIMP, which has a good screen capture feature. Ksnapshot is fast and generates perfect screen captures with a default export of 32bit PNG, the best format in my opinion for screen shots. <span class="warning">Never, ever use Jpeg for screen shots which you intend to use for print.</span> Probably 95% of the Scribus screen shots I've ever made for both web and print are done with Ksnapshot. As I mentioned, there are others, this is just my choice and it works TM.</p>
 
<div style="text-align: center"><img src="<?php echo $scr_shots_root; ?>ksnapshot.png" alt="KSnapshot Screenshot" title="KSnapshot Screenshot" /></div>
<table width="100%"><tr><td align="center"><img src="images/ksnapshot.png" alt="KSnapshot Screenshot" title="KSnapshot Screenshot" /></td></tr></table>
</qt>
/trunk/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/install3.html
1,3 → 1,5
<qt>
<title>Compiling and Installing</title>
<h2>Compiling and Installing</h2>
<p>In order to compile and install Scribus on your system, type the following
in the base directory of the Scribus distribution after uncompressing the
57,3 → 59,5
<p>The default location for the Scribus executable is located in <code>/usr/local/bin</code>. Documentation is located in <code>/usr/local/lib/scribus/doc</code></p>
<p>In addition, there is a <code>desktop.config</code> file named <code>scribus.desktop</code> which can be used for a menu shortcut or desktop shortcut. Simply copy this from the base directory of the installation source directory to your KDE desktop and this will launch Scribus. After dragging this to the desktop, right click and make sure the execute check box is checked. This file conforms to the latest <a href="http://www.freedesktop.org">www.freedesktop.org</a> specifications.</p>
<p>Since Scribus uses <code>autoconf</code>, as long as you have the correct developement versions of the libraries, you should have little difficulty compiling it. Should you run into problems please report them to the Scribus mailing list or IRC channel. See <a href="resources.html">Community Resources</a> section of this manual.</p>
 
</qt>
/trunk/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/install-dpkg.html
1,3 → 1,5
<qt>
<title>How to use the Scribus Debian Repository</title>
<h2>How to use the Scribus Debian Repository</h2>
<p><em>These notes are kindly provided by our Debian package maintainer, Alex Moskalenko.</em> malex at tagancha.org. Please direct questions related to Scribus on Debian to the above email.</p>
 
46,4 → 48,5
<p>Note: these instructions are also partially available at:</p>
<a href="http://www.debian.org/doc/FAQ/ch-pkg_basics.en.html">http://www.debian.org/doc/FAQ/ch-pkg_basics.en.html</a>
<p>See section 6.13 "How do I install a source package?" and section 6.14 "How do I build binary packages from a source package?"</p>
<p>Enjoy Scribus!</p>
<p>Enjoy Scribus!</p>
</qt>
/trunk/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/pdfexport3.html
1,3 → 1,5
<qt>
<title>PDF Exporting from Scribus</title>
<h2>PDF Exporting from Scribus</h2>
<h3>Screen Display and On-line PDF Forms</h3>
<p>Choose these settings when downloading speed or small size is important.</p>
12,4 → 14,5
<li>Avoid importing EPS or PDFs into your document - instead convert them to PNG with GSview, then place in your Scribus document. Why? They will render faster on your screen and often make for a smaller file size.</li>
<li>Avoid using the Nimbus fonts, if they are not at least sub-set. Acrobat Reader on other platforms does a poor job of substitution using its included fonts. One other issue which can trip you up is Helvetica is often alised to Nimbus Sans L on many distros.</li>
<li>Unless transparency in artwork is needed, select PDF 1.3 output for the greatest compatibility with other users.</li>
</ul>
</ul>
</qt>
/trunk/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/screenshots.html
1,15 → 1,17
<h2>Scribus Screen Shot Gallery</h2><p>
<qt>
<title>Scribus Screenshot Gallery</title>
<h2>Scribus Screenshot Gallery</h2><p>
 
<table>
<tr>
<td align='center'>
<a href="<?php echo $scr_shots_root; ?>colormanager.png"><img src="<?php echo $scr_shotsthumbs_root; ?>colormanager.png" width="140" height="88" alt="<?php echo $scr_shotsthumbs_root; ?>colormanager.png"/></a>
<a href="images/colormanager.png"><img src="<?php echo $scr_shotsthumbs_root; ?>colormanager.png" width="140" height="88" alt="<?php echo $scr_shotsthumbs_root; ?>colormanager.png"/></a>
<div>colormanager.png</div>
<div>536 x 337</div>
<div>(20 KB) </div>
</td>
<td align='center'>
<a href="<?php echo $scr_shots_root; ?>colormanager2.png"><img src="<?php echo $scr_shotsthumbs_root; ?>colormanager2.png" width="128" height="140" alt="<?php echo $scr_shotsthumbs_root; ?>colormanager2.png"/></a>
<a href="images/colormanager2.png"><img src="<?php echo $scr_shotsthumbs_root; ?>colormanager2.png" width="128" height="140" alt="<?php echo $scr_shotsthumbs_root; ?>colormanager2.png"/></a>
<div>colormanager2.png</div>
<div>311 x 339</div>
 
16,13 → 18,13
<div>(28 KB) </div>
</td>
<td align='center'>
<a href="<?php echo $scr_shots_root; ?>fontprev.png"><img src="<?php echo $scr_shotsthumbs_root; ?>fontprev.png" width="140" height="70" alt="<?php echo $scr_shotsthumbs_root; ?>fontprev.png"/></a>
<a href="images/fontprev.png"><img src="<?php echo $scr_shotsthumbs_root; ?>fontprev.png" width="140" height="70" alt="<?php echo $scr_shotsthumbs_root; ?>fontprev.png"/></a>
<div>fontprev.png</div>
<div>535 x 268</div>
<div>(33 KB) </div>
</td>
<td align='center'>
<a href="<?php echo $scr_shots_root; ?>gradients1.jpg"><img src="<?php echo $scr_shotsthumbs_root; ?>gradients1.png" width="140" height="118" alt="<?php echo $scr_shotsthumbs_root; ?>gradients1.png"/></a>
<a href="images/gradients1.jpg"><img src="<?php echo $scr_shotsthumbs_root; ?>gradients1.png" width="140" height="118" alt="<?php echo $scr_shotsthumbs_root; ?>gradients1.png"/></a>
<div>gradients1.jpg</div>
<div>820 x 696</div>
 
31,13 → 33,13
</tr>
<tr>
<td align='center'>
<a href="<?php echo $scr_shots_root; ?>gradients1.png"><img src="<?php echo $scr_shotsthumbs_root; ?>gradients1.png" width="140" height="118" alt="<?php echo $scr_shotsthumbs_root; ?>gradients1.png"/></a>
<a href="images/gradients1.png"><img src="<?php echo $scr_shotsthumbs_root; ?>gradients1.png" width="140" height="118" alt="<?php echo $scr_shotsthumbs_root; ?>gradients1.png"/></a>
<div>gradients1.png</div>
<div>820 x 696</div>
<div>(103 KB) </div>
</td>
<td align='center'>
<a href="<?php echo $scr_shots_root; ?>gradients2.png"><img src="<?php echo $scr_shotsthumbs_root; ?>gradients2.png" width="140" height="118" alt="<?php echo $scr_shotsthumbs_root; ?>gradients2.png"/></a>
<a href="images/gradients2.png"><img src="<?php echo $scr_shotsthumbs_root; ?>gradients2.png" width="140" height="118" alt="<?php echo $scr_shotsthumbs_root; ?>gradients2.png"/></a>
<div>gradients2.png</div>
 
<div>820 x 696</div>
44,13 → 46,13
<div>(86 KB) </div>
</td>
<td align='center'>
<a href="<?php echo $scr_shots_root; ?>pages1.png"><img src="<?php echo $scr_shotsthumbs_root; ?>pages1.png" width="140" height="119" alt="<?php echo $scr_shotsthumbs_root; ?>pages1.png"/></a>
<a href="images/pages1.png"><img src="<?php echo $scr_shotsthumbs_root; ?>pages1.png" width="140" height="119" alt="<?php echo $scr_shotsthumbs_root; ?>pages1.png"/></a>
<div>pages1.png</div>
<div>822 x 701</div>
<div>(157 KB) </div>
</td>
<td align='center'>
<a href="<?php echo $scr_shots_root; ?>properties1.png"><img src="<?php echo $scr_shotsthumbs_root; ?>properties1.png" width="67" height="140" alt="<?php echo $scr_shotsthumbs_root; ?>properties1.png"/></a>
<a href="images/properties1.png"><img src="<?php echo $scr_shotsthumbs_root; ?>properties1.png" width="67" height="140" alt="<?php echo $scr_shotsthumbs_root; ?>properties1.png"/></a>
<div>properties.png</div>
 
<div>221 x 438</div>
59,7 → 61,7
</tr>
<tr>
<td align='center'>
<a href="<?php echo $scr_shots_root; ?>scribus1.png"><img src="<?php echo $scr_shotsthumbs_root; ?>scribus1.png" width="140" height="105" alt="<?php echo $scr_shotsthumbs_root; ?>scribus1.png"/></a>
<a href="images/scribus1.png"><img src="<?php echo $scr_shotsthumbs_root; ?>scribus1.png" width="140" height="105" alt="<?php echo $scr_shotsthumbs_root; ?>scribus1.png"/></a>
<div>scribus1.png</div>
<div>1024 x 768</div>
<div>(147 KB) </div>
66,13 → 68,13
</td>
<td align='center'>
 
<a href="<?php echo $scr_shots_root; ?>scribus2.png"><img src="<?php echo $scr_shotsthumbs_root; ?>scribus2.png" width="140" height="92" alt="<?php echo $scr_shotsthumbs_root; ?>scribus2.png"/></a>
<a href="images/scribus2.png"><img src="<?php echo $scr_shotsthumbs_root; ?>scribus2.png" width="140" height="92" alt="<?php echo $scr_shotsthumbs_root; ?>scribus2.png"/></a>
<div>scribus2.png</div>
<div>704 x 466</div>
<div>(17 KB) </div>
</td>
<td align='center'>
<a href="<?php echo $scr_shots_root; ?>scribustru1.png"><img src="<?php echo $scr_shotsthumbs_root; ?>scribustru1.png" width="140" height="118" alt="<?php echo $scr_shotsthumbs_root; ?>scribustru1.png"/></a>
<a href="images/scribustru1.png"><img src="<?php echo $scr_shotsthumbs_root; ?>scribustru1.png" width="140" height="118" alt="<?php echo $scr_shotsthumbs_root; ?>scribustru1.png"/></a>
<div>scribustru1.png</div>
<div>820 x 696</div>
<div>(137 KB) </div>
79,7 → 81,7
</td>
 
<td align='center'>
<a href="<?php echo $scr_shots_root; ?>scribustru2.png"><img src="<?php echo $scr_shotsthumbs_root; ?>scribustru2.png" width="140" height="75" alt="<?php echo $scr_shotsthumbs_root; ?>scribustru2.png"/></a>
<a href="images/scribustru2.png"><img src="<?php echo $scr_shotsthumbs_root; ?>scribustru2.png" width="140" height="75" alt="<?php echo $scr_shotsthumbs_root; ?>scribustru2.png"/></a>
<div>scribustru2.png</div>
<div>744 x 399</div>
<div>(51 KB) </div>
87,7 → 89,7
</tr>
<tr>
<td align='center'>
<a href="<?php echo $scr_shots_root; ?>scribustru3.png"><img src="<?php echo $scr_shotsthumbs_root; ?>scribustru3.png" width="140" height="117" alt="<?php echo $scr_shotsthumbs_root; ?>scribustru3.png"/></a>
<a href="images/scribustru3.png"><img src="<?php echo $scr_shotsthumbs_root; ?>scribustru3.png" width="140" height="117" alt="<?php echo $scr_shotsthumbs_root; ?>scribustru3.png"/></a>
<div>scribustru3.png</div>
<div>592 x 495</div>
 
94,13 → 96,13
<div>(53 KB) </div>
</td>
<td align='center'>
<a href="<?php echo $scr_shots_root; ?>scribustru4.png"><img src="<?php echo $scr_shotsthumbs_root; ?>scribustru4.png" width="140" height="86" alt="<?php echo $scr_shotsthumbs_root; ?>scribustru4.png"/></a>
<a href="images/scribustru4.png"><img src="<?php echo $scr_shotsthumbs_root; ?>scribustru4.png" width="140" height="86" alt="<?php echo $scr_shotsthumbs_root; ?>scribustru4.png"/></a>
<div>scribustru4.png</div>
<div>610 x 377</div>
<div>(43 KB) </div>
</td>
<td align='center'>
<a href="<?php echo $scr_shots_root; ?>sepsprev1.png"><img src="<?php echo $scr_shotsthumbs_root; ?>sepsprev1.png" width="134" height="140" alt="<?php echo $scr_shotsthumbs_root; ?>sepsprev1.png"/></a>
<a href="images/sepsprev1.png"><img src="<?php echo $scr_shotsthumbs_root; ?>sepsprev1.png" width="134" height="140" alt="<?php echo $scr_shotsthumbs_root; ?>sepsprev1.png"/></a>
<div>sepsprev1.png</div>
<div>622 x 646</div>
 
107,7 → 109,7
<div>(126 KB) </div>
</td>
<td align='center'>
<a href="<?php echo $scr_shots_root; ?>sepsprev2.png"><img src="<?php echo $scr_shotsthumbs_root; ?>sepsprev2.png" width="134" height="140" alt="<?php echo $scr_shotsthumbs_root; ?>sepsprev2.png"/></a>
<a href="images/sepsprev2.png"><img src="<?php echo $scr_shotsthumbs_root; ?>sepsprev2.png" width="134" height="140" alt="<?php echo $scr_shotsthumbs_root; ?>sepsprev2.png"/></a>
<div>sepsprev2.png</div>
<div>622 x 646</div>
<div>(111 KB) </div>
115,7 → 117,7
</tr>
<tr>
<td align='center'>
<a href="<?php echo $scr_shots_root; ?>sepspreview1.png"><img src="<?php echo $scr_shotsthumbs_root; ?>sepspreview1.png" width="140" height="94" alt="<?php echo $scr_shotsthumbs_root; ?>sepspreview1.png"/></a>
<a href="images/sepspreview1.png"><img src="<?php echo $scr_shotsthumbs_root; ?>sepspreview1.png" width="140" height="94" alt="<?php echo $scr_shotsthumbs_root; ?>sepspreview1.png"/></a>
<div>sepspreview1.png</div>
 
<div>836 x 564</div>
122,13 → 124,13
<div>(49 KB) </div>
</td>
<td align='center'>
<a href="<?php echo $scr_shots_root; ?>storyedit.png"><img src="<?php echo $scr_shotsthumbs_root; ?>storyedit.jpg" width="140" height="89" alt="<?php echo $scr_shotsthumbs_root; ?>storyedit.jpg"/></a>
<a href="images/storyedit.png"><img src="<?php echo $scr_shotsthumbs_root; ?>storyedit.jpg" width="140" height="89" alt="<?php echo $scr_shotsthumbs_root; ?>storyedit.jpg"/></a>
<div>storyedit.png</div>
<div>668 x 526</div>
<div>(85 KB) </div>
</td>
<td align='center'>
<a href="<?php echo $scr_shots_root; ?>vectoredit1.png"><img src="<?php echo $scr_shotsthumbs_root; ?>vectoredit1.png" width="140" height="105" alt="<?php echo $scr_shotsthumbs_root; ?>vectoredit1.png"/></a>
<a href="images/vectoredit1.png"><img src="<?php echo $scr_shotsthumbs_root; ?>vectoredit1.png" width="140" height="105" alt="<?php echo $scr_shotsthumbs_root; ?>vectoredit1.png"/></a>
<div>vectoredit1.png</div>
 
<div>1024 x 768</div>
135,10 → 137,11
<div>(120 KB) </div>
</td>
<td align='center'>
<a href="<?php echo $scr_shots_root; ?>vectoredit2.png"><img src="<?php echo $scr_shotsthumbs_root; ?>vectoredit2.png" width="140" height="105" alt="<?php echo $scr_shotsthumbs_root; ?>vectoredit2.png"/></a>
<a href="images/vectoredit2.png"><img src="<?php echo $scr_shotsthumbs_root; ?>vectoredit2.png" width="140" height="105" alt="<?php echo $scr_shotsthumbs_root; ?>vectoredit2.png"/></a>
<div>vectoredit2.png</div>
<div>1024 x 768</div>
<div>(126 KB) </div>
</td>
</tr>
</table>
</table>
</qt>
/trunk/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/cygwin.html
1,2 → 1,5
<qt>
<title>Scribus and Cygwin</title>
<h2>Scribus and Cygwin</h2>
<p>This section coming soon.</p>
<p>This section coming soon.</p>
</qt>
/trunk/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/gsadv.html
1,3 → 1,5
<qt>
<title>Advanced Ghostscript and GSview Hints</title>
<h2>Advanced Ghostscript and GSview Hints</h2>
<p>One of the frustrations for users of RPM-based or commercially created distros, is the lack of availability of the latest versions of Ghostscript(GS). Because of the differences in licensing between the GPL Ghostscript and AFPL Ghostscript, GPL Ghostscript releases usually follow by about a year, the release of the most up to date AFPL GS. Because, there are certain restrictions in AFPL, most Linux distros ship an older and heavily patched version of GPL Ghostscript.</p>
<p>As the current GS 8.x resource configuration is new, simply dropping in the latest GS tarball and rebuilding the RPM does not quite work. Lord knows I've tried on Red Hat and I consider myself to be pretty well versed in RPM building. If you have ever seen the Red Hat or SuSE rpm spec file for GS, you will know what I mean. ;)</p>
89,13 → 91,14
</ol>
<p>If you are concerned about messing about with your existing packaging setup, you could use: <a href="http://asic-linux.com.mx/~izto/checkinstall/">checkinstall</a> or <a href="http://xstow.sourceforge.net/">Xstow</a>. These programs will keep track of applications which are outside of your normal packaging system. I have used checkinstall with good luck in these kinds of situations on RedHat systems.</p>
<p>Next,if installed, open up GSview and go to <strong>Options.. > Advanced Configure.</strong> Then, make sure the "Ghostscript Shared Object" is pointing at the correct libgs.so. Below is how I have setup GSview on my system.: </p><br />
<div style="text-align: center"><img src="<?php echo $scr_shots_root; ?>gsadv1.png" alt="GSview - Advanced Options Panel" align="middle" title="GSview - Advanced Options Panel" /></div>
<table width="100%"><tr><td align="center"><img src="images/gsadv1.png" alt="GSview - Advanced Options Panel" align="middle" title="GSview - Advanced Options Panel" /></td></tr></table>
<p>Next, we need to tell Scribus where to find the newer GS. Go <strong>Edit..> Preferences.. >General.</strong> Then in <strong>External Tools</strong>, add the path the new GS.</p>
 
<div style="text-align: center"><img src="<?php echo $scr_shots_root; ?>gsadv2.png" alt="Scribus External Tools Preferences" align="middle" title="Scribus External Tools Preferences" /></div>
<table width="100%"><tr><td align="center"><img src="images/gsadv2.png" alt="Scribus External Tools Preferences" align="middle" title="Scribus External Tools Preferences" /></td></tr></table>
 
<p>Another tool which is available with GSview is <strong>epstool</strong>. An older version is shipped with the current GSview 4.6, but a newer one is available on the GSview home page. This is a great command line tool, which can perform advanced EPS/DCS 2.0 conversion. This is very useful when someone sends you an EPS file from other DTP applications - even those created on Macs. Upgrading this to work with GSview gives you excellent support on Linux to handle EPS files from all platforms. Recommended.</p>
<p>Lastly, one other tool which works as a plug-in with GSview is <a href="http://pstoedit.net">pstoedit</a> This is a command line tool for converting bitmap images into vectors and postscript, which then, depending on the nature of the image, can be edited in a vector drawing tool like Inkscape or Skencil. See the section <a href="import.html">Import Hints</a> for hints on how I used this to convert the Scribus logo into SVG and then a native Scribus file. GSview uses this as a plug-in to convert files into vector format. </p>
 
<p>GSview has been, in my experience, the most reliable and
versatile EPS/PS viewer on Linux. How good is it ? Well, the best example is letting you know this usually installed on every Windows DTP workstation I support for clients. For DTP with Scribus, I consider it essential.</p>
versatile EPS/PS viewer on Linux. How good is it ? Well, the best example is letting you know this usually installed on every Windows DTP workstation I support for clients. For DTP with Scribus, I consider it essential.</p>
</qt>
/trunk/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/scripterapi-dialogs.html
1,3 → 1,5
<qt>
<title>Using Dialogs from Scribus</title>
<h2>Using Dialogs from Scribus</h2>
 
<dl>
32,4 → 34,5
<dt>DocChanged(1|0)</dt>
<dd>Enable/disable save icon.</dd>
 
</dl>
</dl>
</qt>
/trunk/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/gettexthowto.html
1,5 → 1,7
<qt>
<title>How To Write a Scribus Get Text Plugin</title>
<h2>How To Write a Scribus Get Text Plugin</h2>
<h4>Plug-in and article written by Riku Leino</h4>
<h4>Plugin interface and article written by Riku Leino</h4>
<h3>Preface</h3>
 
<p>This article shows you how to write Get Text plugins for Scribus. Plugins are dynamic loaded libraries in "so" format. Get Text Plugins are used to import formatted text from all kinds of file formats into a Scribus text frame.</p>
66,7 → 68,7
</pre>
</small></td></tr></table></blockquote>
 
<p><a href="<?php echo $scr_download_root?>importnothingplugin-1.0.tar.bz2">importnothingplugin-1.0.tar.bz2</a> can be used as a basis of your own get text plugin.</p>
<p>The <code>importnothingplugin-1.0.tar.bz2</code> from http://docs.scribus.net can be used as a basis of your own get text plugin.</p>
 
<h3>How does it work?</h3>
 
140,6 → 142,7
</small></td></tr></table></blockquote>
 
<p>Now after right clicking on a text frame, choosing "Get Text..." and selecting our just built importer and opening some file we get a text frame with the sample text formatted correctly.</p>
<img src="<?php echo $scr_shots_root; ?>result.png" alt="Sample frame"/>
<table width="100%"><tr><td align="center"><img src="images/result.png" alt="Sample frame"/></td></tr></table>
 
<p>If you have any questions send mail to Riku Leino (IRC nick:Tsoots) tsoots at welho.com</a>, register for Scribus mailing list or join the irc channel #scribus at irc.freenode.net.</p>
<p>If you have any questions send mail to Riku Leino (IRC nick:Tsoots) tsoots at welho.com, register for Scribus mailing list or join the irc channel #scribus at irc.freenode.net.</p>
</qt>
/trunk/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/install.html
1,3 → 1,5
<qt>
<title>Installation of Scribus</title>
<h2>Installation of Scribus</h2>
 
<p>The installation process of Scribus depends on the distribution of Linux/Unix that you are using. This is the case just like it is for any program you may wish to install. The following are examples for how to install Scribus on various distributions:</p>
18,3 → 20,5
<p>Depending on the version of your distribution, there is the possiblity that you may need to upgrade various dependencies of Scribus and the above commands should make sure the required packages are installed.</p>
<p>For example, to access the font files you want to use in Scribus, Scribus relies on FreeType. For getting the best results we recommend using FreeType version 2.1.3 or later. Without having certain levels of software, we cannot guarantee correct operation of Scribus, or guarantee you achieve the results you are trying to get. If the above commands do not upgrade all the dependencies on your system, please refer to the <a href="install2.html">Requirements</a> page to make sure you have them.</p>
<p>For those who wish to install a more recent version of Scribus than that is included in their distribution, please check you have all the <a href="install2.html">Requirements</a> and continue into the <a href="install1.html">Scribus Source</a> section.</p>
 
</qt>
/trunk/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/toolbox3.html
1,3 → 1,5
<qt>
<title>Batik</title>
<h2>Batik</h2>
 
<p>Batik is actually a collection of Apache XML modules for on the fly export/conversion of SVG. One of the really useful tools in the collection is <strong>Squiggle</strong>, a Java application for simply viewing SVG. From my experience, this is a difficult application to compile on some distributions, so hopefully its packaged for you. </p>
4,4 → 6,5
 
<p>Why bother? Call it the sober judge of SVG. Of all of the SVG viewers, it is probably one of, if not the, most spec compliant viewers. If you receive or create an SVG and it won't import properly, see how it views with Batik. If it does not display properly it is more than likely an issue with the creating application. The exception to this is SVG exported from Adobe Illustrator, which often has Adobe only extensions included in the SVG file, thus only viewable in Adobe SVG viewers or applications. As the saying goes, your mileage may vary.</p>
 
<div style="text-align: center"><img src="<?php echo $scr_shots_root; ?>batik1.png" align="center" alt="Batik" /></div>
<table width="100%"><tr><td align="center"><img src="images/batik1.png" align="center" alt="Batik" /></td></tr></table>
</qt>
/trunk/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/fonts1.html
1,3 → 1,5
<qt>
<title>Font Preferences and Managing Fonts with Scribus</title>
<h2>Font Preferences and Managing Fonts with Scribus</h2>
 
<h3>Overview</h3>
17,22 → 19,22
 
<p>Open Scribus <strong>without</strong> any documents open. Then <strong>Edit &#062; Preferences &#062; Fonts</strong>, which will bring up a tabbed panel. Select the Additional Paths tab:</p>
 
<div style="text-align: center"><img src="<?php echo $scr_shots_root; ?>fontpref1.png" alt="Adding additional font paths." title="Adding additional font paths."/></div>
<table width="100%"><tr><td align="center"><img src="images/fontpref1.png" alt="Adding additional font paths." title="Adding additional font paths."/></td></tr></table>
 
<p>Here you can add font paths, which are not part of the XFree86 or X-org defaults. In the example here, we have added three user defined paths where there are fonts we wish to use within Scribus. The
directory <code>.fonts</code> is the default directory for use with the new <a href="<?php echo $site_content_root;?>fontconfig.php">fontconfig</a> mechanism with Xft2 included with newer distributions. After clicking <strong>OK</strong>, Scribus will add these font paths and any correctly installed fonts will be available immediately to new or existing documents you open.</p>
directory <code>.fonts</code> is the default directory for use with the new <a href="fontconfig.html">fontconfig</a> mechanism with Xft2 included with newer distributions. After clicking <strong>OK</strong>, Scribus will add these font paths and any correctly installed fonts will be available immediately to new or existing documents you open.</p>
 
<h3>Font Substitutions</h3>
 
<p>When opening a Scribus document, Scribus runs a check to see if all fonts specified in a document are available. In the case a given font is not available on your workstation, you are given a choice upon opening the doc to make a substitution. You can can further adjust this preference with the <strong>Font Substitutions</strong> tab. This allows you to change the default substitution pattern. In this example, we are substituting Timmons Bold, included with Star Office 5.2, with a True Type version of Time New Roman.</p>
 
<div style="text-align: center"><img src="<?php echo $scr_shots_root; ?>fontpref2.png" alt="Font Substitutions" title="Font Substitutions" /></div>
<table width="100%"><tr><td align="center"><img src="images/fontpref2.png" alt="Font Substitutions" title="Font Substitutions" /></td></tr></table>
 
<h4>Available Fonts</h4>
 
<p>This tab shows available system-wide fonts, including user specified paths. You can also change which fonts are used within Scribus on a font by font basis, as well as which fonts are embedded within postscript output.</p>
 
<div style="text-align: center"><img src="<?php echo $scr_shots_root; ?>fontpref3.png" alt="Available Fonts and Embedding Preferences" title="Available Fonts and Embedding Preferences"/></div>
<table width="100%"><tr><td align="center"><img src="images/fontpref3.png" alt="Available Fonts and Embedding Preferences" title="Available Fonts and Embedding Preferences"/></td></tr></table>
 
<p>In this example, Nimbus Roman (a Times or Times Roman lookalike) has been disabled, as we find on occasion, it does not display optimally on other platforms, as Acrobat Reader will substitute its own Multi Master fonts.</p>
 
41,4 → 43,5
<li><strong>Sub-Setting</strong> fonts is including all the glyphs in the font in the postscript stream or a PDF. This allows smaller PDFs, at the expense of making it difficult to make minor edits in pre-press tools like Pit Stop. Unless you are sending PDF to commerical printer, you can sub-set fonts fairly reliably. This is important when you are trying to keep a downloadable PDF to the smallest size.</li>
<li><strong>Open Type Fonts</strong> cannot be fully embedded by default. This greatly simplifies handling them in other applications. Open Type Fonts and Unicode True Type Fonts can be quite large. Open Type Fonts are exported as outlines in PDF. The allows them to be used in PDF, where often other applications cannot use them.</li>
<li><strong>Converting to outlines.</strong> Scribus can optionally convert text to postscript outlines. This can be a valuable option when your printer might not have a new enough RIP or imagesetter to accept PDF 1.4. This is also sometime a good option before exporting SVG or EPS files. When you are certain EPS files will be imported into other applications or across platforms this is recommended.</li>
</ul>
</ul>
</qt>
/trunk/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/toolbox7.html
1,3 → 1,5
<qt>
<title>Advanced Ghostscript and GSview Hints</title>
<h2>Advanced Ghostscript and GSview Hints</h2>
<p>One of the frustrations for users of RPM-based or commercially created distributions, is the lack of availability of the latest versions of Ghostscript(GS). Because of the differences in licensing between the GPL Ghostscript and AFPL Ghostscript, GPL Ghostscript releases usually follow by about a year, the release of the most up to date AFPL GS. Because, there are certain restrictions in AFPL, most Linux distributions ship an older and heavily patched version of GPL Ghostscript.</p>
<p>As the current GS 8.x resource configuration (where it looks for fonts and fontmaps) is new, simply dropping in the latest GS tarball and rebuilding the RPM does not quite work. Lord knows I've tried on Red Hat and I consider myself to be pretty well versed in RPM building. If you have ever seen the Red Hat or Suse rpm spec file for GS, you will know what I mean. ;)</p>
76,10 → 78,12
<li>There is a reasonable search path for fonts, so GS can find your fonts. You will get errors in Scribus, when attempting to import EPS files or using the print preview, if this path is not set correctly and GS cannot find fonts. GS determines where to find fonts in a file called Fontmap. Setting this option is explained in the GS documentation.</li> </ol>
<p>If you are concerned about messing about with your existing packaging setup, you could use: <code>checkinstall</code> or <code>Xstow</code>. These programs will keep track of applications which are outside of your normal packaging system. I have used checkinstall with good luck in these kinds of situations on Red Hat systems.</p>
<p>Next,if installed, open up GSview and go to <strong>Options.. &#062; Advanced Configure</strong>. Then, make sure the &#034;Ghostscript Shared Object&#034; is pointing at the correct libgs.so. Below is how I have setup GSview on my system.: </p>
<div style="text-align: center"><img src="<?php echo $scr_shots_root; ?>gsadv1.png" alt="GSview - Advanced Options Panel" align="middle" title="GSview - Advanced Options Panel" /></div>
<table width="100%"><tr><td align="center"><img src="images/gsadv1.png" alt="GSview - Advanced Options Panel" align="middle" title="GSview - Advanced Options Panel" /></td></tr></table>
 
<p>Next, we need to tell Scribus where to find the newer GS. Go <strong>Edit..&#062; Preferences.. &#062;General</strong>. Then in External Tools, add the path the new GS.</p>
<div style="text-align: center"><img src="<?php echo $scr_shots_root; ?>gsadv2.png" alt="Scribus External Tools Preferences" align="middle" title="Scribus External Tools Preferences" /></div>
<table width="100%"><tr><td align="center"><img src="images/gsadv2.png" alt="Scribus External Tools Preferences" align="middle" title="Scribus External Tools Preferences" /></td></tr></table>
<p>Another tool which is available with GSview is <code>epstool</code>. An older version is shipped with the current GSview 4.6, but a newer one is available on the GSview home page. This is a great command line tool, which can perform advanced EPS/DCS 2.0 conversion. This is very useful when someone sends you an EPS file from other DTP applications - even those created on Macs. Upgrading this to work with GSview gives you excellent support on Linux to handle EPS files from all platforms. Recommended.</p>
<p>Lastly, one other tool which works as a plug-in with GSview is <code>pstoedit</code> This is a command line tool for converting bitmap images into vectors and PostScript, which then, depending on the nature of the image, can be edited in a vector drawing tool like Inkscape or Skencil. See the section Import Hints for hints on how I used this to convert the Scribus logo into SVG and then a native Scribus file. GSview uses this as a plug-in to convert files into vector format. </p>
<p>GSview has been, in my experience, the most reliable and versatile EPS/PS viewer on Linux. How good is it ? Well, the best example is letting you know this usually installed on every Windows DTP workstation I support for clients. For DTP with Scribus, I consider it essential.</p>
 
</qt>
/trunk/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/print2.html
1,7 → 1,9
<qt>
<title>Print Previewing</title>
<h2>Print Previewing</h2>
<p>As mentioned in the prior section, one of the challenges of an advanced DTP application like Scribus, is the ability to generate what I refer to as "high-level" postscript or PDF features. The print previewer in Scribus is quite special, as it does more than just generate a screen dump of your document. Scribus generates its print preview by actually outputting a temporary PS file and then using some of the special "devices" from Ghostscript. Have patience when launching the print preview, Scribus and Ghostscript do a lot of work in the background. Newer GS 8.x versions will have far fewer limits on the kinds of advanced PS which can be displayed. The print previewer also gives you the option to preview the individual inks in CMYK color.</p>
<p>The print previewer can help you to identify images and artwork, which may have difficulty printing directly on your particular printing setup. This often depends on the capabilities of your printing system, along with the types of advanced features included in your documents. The types of features which can be troublesome with some printing setups include gradients, transparency and complex masking to name a few. The print previewer also can help to give you an idea of color shifts which might occur when printing in CMYK mode.</p>
<div style="text-align: center"><img src="<?php echo $scr_shots_root; ?>printpreview.png" align="center" alt="Print Previewer" title="Print Previewer" /></div>
<table width="100%"><tr><td align="center"><img src="images/printpreview.png" align="center" alt="Print Previewer" title="Print Previewer" /></td></tr></table>
<h4>Print Previewer Options</h4>
<p>Most of these options are for advanced CMYK or commercial printing. The first two check boxes are useful for all users.</p>
<ul>
10,4 → 12,5
<li><strong>Display Transparency </strong>- renders items with transparency enabled with a special GS driver. Note: This function requires GS 7.07 or newer and the <strong>pngalpha</strong> device in GS. </li>
<li><strong>Under Color Removal</strong> - This feature enables/disables Under Color Removal, a technique which can improve CMYK printing, especially with media like newspaper or other highly absorbant papers. UCR, for short is used to prevent over saturation of inks in these situations. Normally, for common ink-jet printing this should be disabled.</li>
<li><strong>Display CMYK</strong> - Enabling this option gives you a simulation of generic CMYK inks on the screen. Once enabled, you can selectivly disable/enable any of the C (Cyan), M (Magenta),Y (Yellow) or K (BlacK) ink displays. </li>
</ul>
</ul>
</qt>
/trunk/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/docinfo.html
1,3 → 1,5
<qt>
<title>Scribus Document Information</title>
<h2>Scribus Document Information</h2>
<h4>Overview</h4>
<p>There are a couple of important points to consider in the document info fields:</p>
7,7 → 9,7
</ol>
<p>The second tab is document info which is strictly Dublin Core, thus defined by the specifications:</p>
 
<div style="text-align: center"><img src="<?php echo $scr_shots_root; ?>RDF.png" alt="Dublin Core Properties" title="Dublin Core Properties in Document" /></div>
<table width="100%"><tr><td align="center"><img src="images/RDF.png" alt="Dublin Core Properties" title="Dublin Core Properties in Document" /></td></tr></table>
 
<table>
<tbody>
56,4 → 58,5
<td align="justify"> Information about rights held in and over the document, eg. copyright, patent or trademark</td>
</tr>
</tbody>
</table>
</table>
</qt>
/trunk/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/settings1.html
1,3 → 1,5
<qt>
<title>Settings and Preferences Panels</title>
<h2>Settings and Preferences Panels</h2>
 
<p>The settings panels are the heart of changing the default behaviours of Scribus and give you considerable flexibility in setting document and program defaults. If you are new to DTP, there are extensive tool tips which can guide you for each setting, as well as the included documentation.</p>
9,7 → 11,7
<p>You can change the default theme with Scribus to include themes like Liquid or the new themes based on KDE plug-ins. Scribus will inherit KDE themes and decorations if you have KDE running. If you do not have KDE installed, you can also tune the look of your Qt programs separately with <strong><code>qtconfig</code></strong> from the command line. Simply open a console window and type <code>qtconfig</code>. The configuration panels in Qtconfig are pretty self explanatory. I would advise not increasing the font size above 12 points, as some buttons in Scribus menus might be obscured. In this example, the fonts have been changed to True Type fonts at 10 points and
the latest Mostfet Liquid theme has been applied.</p>
 
<div style="text-align: center"><img src="<?php echo $scr_shots_root; ?>prefspanel1.png" align="center" alt="Edit Style Dialog" title="General Preferences" /></div>
<table width="100%"><tr><td align="center"><img src="images/prefspanel1.png" align="center" alt="Edit Style Dialog" title="General Preferences" /></td></tr></table>
 
<h3>Mouse settings</h3>
<p>If you have a wheel mouse, one of the nice defaults of Scribus is using this to scroll through a Document. Wheel jump changes the number of lines for each scroll of the mouse wheel. <strong>Grab Radius</strong> defines how much distance is allowed to select an object. Smaller numbers mean more
21,24 → 23,24
<h3>Document</h3>
<p>This panel sets the defaults for paper size, page margins and Auto save options. Auto-save enables Scribus to save your file with a backup file with <code>.sla.bak</code> extension.</p>
 
<div style="text-align: center"><img src="<?php echo $scr_shots_root; ?>prefspanel2.png" align="center" alt="Default Document Settings" title="Default Document Settings" /></div>
<table width="100%"><tr><td align="center"><img src="images/prefspanel2.png" align="center" alt="Default Document Settings" title="Default Document Settings" /></td></tr></table>
 
<h3>Guides</h3>
<p>This panel sets the default distances and colors, as well as the snap to settings. <strong>Baseline Grids</strong> is the set of horizontal guides which forces text in multiple columns to align horizontally, as shown below. Settings for the distances for baselines are in Paragraph Styles, as well as the next panel <strong>Typography</strong></p>
 
<div style="text-align: center"><img src="<?php echo $scr_shots_root; ?>prefsguides.png" alt="Guides and Baseline Grid Settings" align="middle" title="Guides and Baseline Grid Settings" /></div>
<table width="100%"><tr><td align="center"><img src="images/prefsguides.png" alt="Guides and Baseline Grid Settings" align="middle" title="Guides and Baseline Grid Settings" /></td></tr></table>
 
<h3>Typography</h3>
<p>Here you can change options for typographic features including subscript, superscript, automatic line spacing and scaling of small capitals. <strong>Disp.:</strong> means displacement or difference in distance above/below normal text. <strong>Baseline Grids</strong> are non-printing grids which align text across multiple columns on the page. <strong>Baseline Offset</strong> is the distance from the top of the page where the topmost baseline is placed.</p>
 
<div style="text-align: center"><img src="<?php echo $scr_shots_root; ?>prefsblgrid1.png" alt="Baseline Grids"title="Baseline Grids" /></div>
<table width="100%"><tr><td align="center"><img src="images/prefsblgrid1.png" alt="Baseline Grids"title="Baseline Grids" /></td></tr></table>
 
<div style="text-align: center"><img src="<?php echo $scr_shots_root; ?>prefspanel3.png" align="center" alt="Typography Tab Panel" /></div>
<table width="100%"><tr><td align="center"><img src="images/prefspanel3.png" align="center" alt="Typography Tab Panel" /></td></tr></table>
 
<h3>Tools</h3>
<p>In the Tools tab you can change the defaults for many common tasks and tools: font, size and color, text frame defaults, image frame defaults and zoom defaults. Most all of these can be overridden or changed with the the right click context menu or in the Properties Palette when selecting an object.</p>
 
<div style="text-align: center"><img src="<?php echo $scr_shots_root;?>prefspanel4.png" alt="Tools Tab Panel" /></div>
<table width="100%"><tr><td align="center"><img src="images/prefspanel4.png" alt="Tools Tab Panel"/></td></tr></table>
 
<h4>Polygon objects</h4>
<p>You can make stars, triangles and convex polygons with intuitive controls. You can also apply gradient colors to all of these shapes within the measurements panel. This picture above makes a star the default.</p>
49,11 → 51,12
<h3>Display</h3>
<p>This panel sets the defaults and options for margin colors, frame display, page background and you have the option to display unprintable areas in the selected margin color. You can also enable page side by side or also known in DTP lingo as &#034;reader spreads&#034;.</p>
 
<div style="text-align: center"><img src="<?php echo $scr_shots_root; ?>prefspanel5.png" alt="Setting the Display Preferences for Scribus" title="Setting the Display Preferences for Scribus" /></div>
<table width="100%"><tr><td align="center"><img src="images/prefspanel5.png" alt="Setting the Display Preferences for Scribus" title="Setting the Display Preferences for Scribus" /></td></tr></table>
 
<p>This panel also enables PDF 1.4 (Acrobat 5+) transparency features. The default is disabled. For more info on PDF look at <a href="pdfexport1.html">PDF Export Options</a> and <a href="pdfx3.html">PDF/X-3 and Scribus</a>. The Adjust Display Size enables you to adjust the screen sizing in order that 1 inch on the screen actually measures 1 inch. Just take an accurate ruler and place it on the screen and adjust the slider until it matches your ruler.</p>
 
<div style="text-align: center"><img src="<?php echo $scr_shots_root; ?>gsadv2.png" alt="External Tools Settings" title="External Tools Settings" /></div>
<table width="100%"><tr><td align="center"><img src="images/gsadv2.png" alt="External Tools Settings" title="External Tools Settings" /></td></tr></table>
 
<h3>External Tools</h3>
<p>This panel enables you to change the default settings for the location of Ghostscript and your preferred image editing tool. In the example above, a parallel build of Ghostscript 8.14 has been installed in <code>/usr/local/bin/</code> for better results with EPS,PS and PDF importing, as well as speedier print-previews. See the hints in <a href="toolbox7.html" title="Advanced Setup of Ghostscript">Advanced Ghostscript.</a> One other important note, when using the GIMP as your image editor, <strong>you must close GIMP completely before, control will return to Scribus.</strong> </p>
<p>This panel enables you to change the default settings for the location of Ghostscript and your preferred image editing tool. In the example above, a parallel build of Ghostscript 8.14 has been installed in <code>/usr/local/bin/</code> for better results with EPS,PS and PDF importing, as well as speedier print-previews. See the hints in <a href="toolbox7.html" title="Advanced Setup of Ghostscript">Advanced Ghostscript.</a> One other important note, when using the GIMP as your image editor, <strong>you must close GIMP completely before, control will return to Scribus.</strong> </p>
</qt>
/trunk/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/toolbox.html
1,3 → 1,5
<qt>
<title>My Linux DTP Tool Box</title>
<h2>My Linux DTP Tool Box</h2>
<p>This is wholly my own personal selection, based fairly narrowly on how capable I find these applications to work with Scribus for print. If you disagree, I'll listen to a well reasoned argument. Note though that part of my day job is to evaluate similar commercial applications for clients. Some of these apps have been tested within the limitations of modern PC hardware. Example: Telling Xnview to create 10,000 thumbnails at once. So in alphabetical order:</p>
<ul>
15,3 → 17,5
<li><a href="toolbox12.html">WINE</a></li>
<li><a href="toolbox13.html">Xnview</a></li>
</ul>
 
</qt>
/trunk/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/faq1.html
1,3 → 1,5
<qt>
<title>General Questions</title>
<a name="top"></a>
<h2>General Questions</h2>
<ul>
144,4 → 146,5
<p>The glyph shaping is a very difficult thing to achieve, we plan to add this in one of the 1.3.x Developers versions.</p>
<a href="#top">Back to top</a><hr>
</li>
</ul>
</ul>
</qt>
/trunk/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/toolbox11.html
1,3 → 1,5
<qt>
<title>Tracing Tools - Converting Bitmap into Vector</title>
<h2>Tracing Tools - Converting Bitmap into Vector</h2>
 
<p>The programs below are known as tracing tools of various types. I recommend if you are working a lot with scanned images, you might want all of them. They share common features in their ability to open bitmap files and convert them into vector format. This can very desirable if you have artwork, which needs to be replicated or reproduced with high fidelity. The reason I suggest all is they use different algorithms for performing conversions.</p>
11,3 → 13,5
<p><strong>Pstoedit</strong> - is slightly different in that it specializes in the conversion of PostScript in to vector using Ghostscript. It works as a plug-in for GSview. </p>
 
<p>The thing to keep in mind when using these is there are many options when performing traces and some experimentation is sometimes required, especially more complex artwork. Don't expect perfection. The first time, it took me a bit of experimenting when I converted the Scribus logo from an EPS with a bitmap embedded into pure SVG, which then imported in Scribus.</p>
 
</qt>
/trunk/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/install4.html
1,3 → 1,5
<qt>
<title>Platforms</title>
<h2>Platforms</h2>
<p>Although developed primarily for Linux, the team is aware of ports or successful compilation for Scribus on FreeBSD, NetBSD, Fink (GPL applications running on OSX with XFree86), Solaris-Sparc and Solaris-x86, HP-UX11 and IRIX. In addition, the author has successfully complied and run earlier versions of Scribus under Solaris/Intel 8 using Sun's Openwin. Scribus has very little platform dependent code, except for Xlibs. News of other successful ports would be welcome. For running Scribus with KDE-Cygwin, see: <a href="cygwin.html">Windows with Cygwin</a>.</p>
<p>Scribus is currently included, packaged or ported for the following distributions or platforms as of 2004-04-30:</p>
18,4 → 20,5
<li>Ark Linux has downloadable rpms and includes Scribus as a standard package.</li>
<li>http://www.linuxpackages.net/index.php</a> has Slackware 9.x packages.</li>
<li>Konstruct which allows one to build KDE 3.2 versions, also includes the latest development version of Scribus in the /unstable section.</li>
</ul>
</ul>
</qt>
/trunk/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/intro.html
1,3 → 1,5
<qt>
<title>Preface</title>
<h2>Preface</h2>
 
<p>This document is a semi-ambitious attempt to create something quite different in technical documentation. The aim is to give the reader a new and different way of learning about a software program, but also using the very tools of the program - while it is being developed to create this modest tome. This documentation is ideally in printed form and also in electronic form using the features of the freely available Adobe Acrobat Reader.</p>
13,3 → 15,5
<p>Thus, the following, is my modest attempt at adding some help to a great program.</p>
 
<p>And remember this is just Version 1.2... </p>
 
</qt>
/trunk/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/scripterapi-getobjprop.html
1,3 → 1,5
<qt>
<title>Getting Object Properties</title>
<h2>Getting Object Properties</h2>
 
<dl>
42,4 → 44,5
<dt>GetSize(["name"]) </dt>
<dd>Returns a tuple with the actual Size of the Object "name" If "name" is not given the currently selected Item is used. The Size is expressed in the actual Measurement Unit of the Document.</dd>
</dl>
</dl>
</qt>
/trunk/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/scripterapi-constants.html
1,3 → 1,5
<qt>
<title>Predefined Constants</title>
<h2>Predefined Constants</h2>
 
<p>There are some Constants defined to help using the Commands: </p>
133,4 → 135,5
<dt>CrossDiagonalGradient</dt>
<dt>RadialGradient</dt>
</dl>
</qt>
/trunk/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/pdfexport4.html
1,3 → 1,5
<qt>
<title>Creating PDF Presentations</title>
<h2>Creating PDF Presentations</h2>
<h3>Presentation PDFs</h3>
<p>Creating Presentation PDFs in Scribus, is not only easy, they work great. Using PDF in place of traditional "presentation" applications does have some advantages:</p>
17,4 → 19,5
<li>When displaying images like photos or screen shots, use a black or dark background on your page. They will make the colors more vibrant and give your viewers more contrast to see all the details in your slides.</li>
<li>Use RGB colors for your images and always use Screen/Web for Export.</li>
<li>One trick I have learned from using PDF for presentation. Load the PDF and run through each page once before giving the presentation, so the file is loaded in memory. This will make for smoother transitions on the screen.</li>
</ul>
</ul>
</qt>
/trunk/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/scripterapi-select.html
1,3 → 1,5
<qt>
<title>Selecting Objects</title>
<h2>Selecting Objects</h2>
 
<dl>
12,4 → 14,5
<dt>SelectObject("name")</dt>
<dd>Selects the Object with the given Name.</dd>
</dl>
</dl>
</qt>
/trunk/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/wine.html
1,3 → 1,5
<qt>
<title>A little WINE with Scribus</title>
<h2>A little WINE with Scribus</h2>
<h3><a name="overview">Overview</a></h2>
<p>One of the facts of life in the desktop publishing world, is the occassional need for working in a cross platform environment. Fortunately, for Linux users in particular, the <a href="http://www.winehq.org">Wine Project</a> and <a href="http://www.codeweavers.com">Codeweavers</a> have made much progress in being able to sucessfully run many Windows applications on top of Linux.</p>
30,6 → 32,7
<p>I would not discourage anyone from buying Crossover Office. The newest version 3.0 runs a number of applications quite well, including Photoshop 5,6,7, as well as in my tests, Illustrator 10 and Indesign 2.0.2. The last two can be taxing even on real Windows at times. I found the demo to have a very polished and easy to use installer, which makes configuration a snap. Codeweavers has contributed a great deal to the success of the Wine project thus far and have been good citizens in the open source community. You can also get Crossover Office with some versions of the Suse and Xandros distributions.</p>
 
<h3>Success</h2>
<p align="center"><img align="center" alt="Acrobat Reader 5.1 under WINE" src="<?php echo $scr_shots_root; ?>acroreader5.1.png" /></p>
<p align="center"><img align="center" alt="PDF Inspektor" src="<?php echo $scr_shots_root; ?>pdfinspektor1.png" /></p>
<p>Although Acrobat 5.0.5 is not offically supported by Codeweavers, it installs and runs very well. Until the day when Linux/Unix has the same parity in commerical application support, Wine is a good transition strategy. Hopefully, you will find these notes useful in supporting your use of Scribus.</p>
<p align="center"><img align="center" alt="Acrobat Reader 5.1 under WINE" src="images/acroreader5.1.png" /></p>
<p align="center"><img align="center" alt="PDF Inspektor" src="images/pdfinspektor1.png" /></p>
<p>Although Acrobat 5.0.5 is not offically supported by Codeweavers, it installs and runs very well. Until the day when Linux/Unix has the same parity in commerical application support, Wine is a good transition strategy. Hopefully, you will find these notes useful in supporting your use of Scribus.</p>
</qt>
/trunk/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/scribuscopyright.html
1,3 → 1,5
<qt>
<title>Scribus Copyright</title>
<h2>Scribus Copyright 2001,2002,2003,2004 Franz Schmid, <a href="mailto:Franz.Schmid@altmuehlnet.de">Franz.Schmid@altmuehlnet.de</a></h2>
 
<p>This program is free software; you can redistribute it and/or modify it under the terms of the GNU General Public License as published by the Free Software Foundation; either version 2 of the License, or (at your option) any later version.</p>
4,4 → 6,5
 
<p>This program is distributed in the hope that it will be useful, but WITHOUT ANY WARRANTY; without even the implied warranty of MERCHANTABILITY or FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. See the GNU General Public License for more details.</p>
 
<p>You should have received a copy of the GNU General Public License along with this program; if not, write to the Free Software Foundation, Inc., 675 Mass Ave, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA.</p>
<p>You should have received a copy of the GNU General Public License along with this program; if not, write to the Free Software Foundation, Inc., 675 Mass Ave, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA.</p>
</qt>
/trunk/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/gsview.html
1,3 → 1,5
<qt>
<title>GSview and Scribus</title>
<h2>GSview and Scribus</h2>
<p><strong>Parts of this section are thanks to Russell Lang, author and maintainer of GSiew, epstool and Ghostscript for his hints and patiently answering my questions about GSview and Ghostscript. It has allowed the Scribus Team to use some of the more advanced features of Ghostscript in Scribus. </strong></p>
<p>Although Acrobat Reader&#174; is in my experience sometimes a better pure viewer for PDF, I also consider GSview one of the most essential tools to have when using Scribus. GSview has a handful of extremely useful functions. For those unfamiliar, it provides an easy to use &quot;front end&quot; to
21,4 → 23,5
<p>So, if you find difficulty with an EPS or PDF you wish to use in Scribus, open the EPS in GSview. Then, use the key command <strong>M</strong> to display messages from Ghostscript. The messages can indicate problems which cause display or printing errors. You can also use the <strong>epswrite</strong> &quot;device&quot; to re-save the EPS, which can help to strip out or fix issues with an EPS.</p>
<p>You can also <em>rasterize</em> an EPS image like this, by converting to PNG or TIFF and then resize, adjust colors etc with an image program like GIMP or Corel Photoshop. I did this with a troublesome EPS and converted it to a 600dpi PNG, which would then display and print perfectly from Scribus. Sometimes when working with images and DTP there are several different ways to accomplish the same task - in my example, it was getting a complex EPS file from Illustrator to display and print properly from Scribus. The fact that there problem displaying the EPS, was not a bug in Scribus, but some non-standard postscript info in the file, which by using Ghostscript as a back end to GSview I could strip out and then display properly in Scribus.</p>
<p>GSview since about 4.3, has been, in my experience, the most reliable and versatile PDF viewer along with Acrobat Reader on Linux. For DTP with Scribus, I consider it essential.</p>
<p>Now, for advanced hints with GSview and Ghostscript, see: <a href="toolbox7.html">Advanced Ghostscript and GSview Hints</a></p>
<p>Now, for advanced hints with GSview and Ghostscript, see: <a href="toolbox7.html">Advanced Ghostscript and GSview Hints</a></p>
</qt>
/trunk/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/scripterapi-setobjprop.html
1,3 → 1,5
<qt>
<title>Setting Object Properties</title>
<h2>Setting Object Properties</h2>
 
<dl>
49,4 → 51,5
<dt>UnlinkTextFrames('name') </dt>
<dd>Remove the specified (named) object from the text frame flows/linkage. </dd>
 
</dl>
</dl>
</qt>
/trunk/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/toolbox4.html
1,3 → 1,5
<qt>
<title>GIMP 2.x</title>
<h2>GIMP 2.x</h2>
 
<p>There is not much to say about the best image application for Linux. GIMP 2.0 has too many improvements to list. A couple of notes though: </p>
5,4 → 7,5
<li>Some distributions do not install the "separate" plug-in which enables you to export CMYK TIFF and duotones. This is very useful in certain circumstances. </li>
<li>GIMP 2.0.x has a Display Filter Tool, which can do some "soft proofing" of images in CMYK colors, but it is not a completely finished feature. GIMP 2.2 will more than likely have much more complete color management features.</li>
<li>Make sure you have the latest 2.0.x stable version. There were some important bug fixes made after 2.0.1.</li>
</ul>
</ul>
</qt>
/trunk/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/keys.html
1,3 → 1,5
<qt>
<title>Keyboard Shortcut Settings</title>
<h2>Keyboard Shortcut Settings</h2>
 
<p>Looking at this panel, you also can click on the keyboard shortcuts button and change the default keys for many menu functions and actions. There is also a PDF of the shortcuts which can be downloaded from the Scribus website. These are the English defaults, all of which can be changed:</p>
56,4 → 58,5
<p>End moves to the end of the line</p>
<p>Ctrl+Shift+Click selects the Object beneath another</p>
<p>Shift+Click adds an Object to the Selection</p>
<p>Ctrl+Alt+Click selects a single Object out of a Groups</p>
<p>Ctrl+Alt+Click selects a single Object out of a Groups</p>
</qt>
/trunk/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/cross-platform.html
1,3 → 1,5
<qt>
<title>Cross Platform Hints and Issues</title>
<h2>Cross Platform Hints and Issues</h2>
 
<p>One thing that exposure has taught me is DTP is one of those areas where cross-platform issues come into play more than most types of applications. PDF does help, but sooner or later, something will pop-up. This section also includes hints on installing Scribus under Cygwin and particular hints for those who wish to use Scribus under fink and MacOSX.</p>
5,4 → 7,5
<li>Have a look through the <a href="http://ahnews.music.salford.ac.uk/scribus/modules.php?op=modload&name=Web_Links&file=index">Web Links</a> for cross-platform tools and downloads.</li>
<li><a href="machints1.html">Mac OSX/Fink Hints</a></li>
<li><a href="cygwin.html">Scribus on KDE-Cygwin</a></li>
</ol>
</ol>
</qt>
/trunk/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/fonts2.html
1,3 → 1,5
<qt>
<title>Fonts in Depth</title>
<h2>Fonts in Depth</h2>
 
<p>Fonts are often where the trouble starts and often ends in DTP. They are in my experience one of the leading troubles in DTP in general and one of the sources of constant questions on the mailing list and IRC. </p>
29,4 → 31,5
 
<p>As for installation, if you use <code>$home/.fonts</code> directory for adding fonts, Scribus should find them just fine. For those leery of messing around with the command line tools for font installation, KDE 3.2+ includes an improved version of Keith Drummond's kfontinstaller program. The one in KDE 3.3 works superbly and you can even preview fonts within Konqueror. In my opinion it is one of the most user friendly font installers I have seen on any platform. Recommended. </p>
 
<p>Scribus also makes it easy to add additional font paths. Simply, close all documents, then select Settings > Fonts > Additional Paths. Select the new path and click OK. If fonts, still do not show up, you may need to add these to either your <code>$home/.fonts.conf</code> file or other method depending on your distro. If some still fail to show up, it is possibly Scribus's font checking mechanism has disabled them. </p>
<p>Scribus also makes it easy to add additional font paths. Simply, close all documents, then select Settings > Fonts > Additional Paths. Select the new path and click OK. If fonts, still do not show up, you may need to add these to either your <code>$home/.fonts.conf</code> file or other method depending on your distro. If some still fail to show up, it is possibly Scribus's font checking mechanism has disabled them. </p>
</qt>
/trunk/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/plugin_howto.html
1,3 → 1,5
<qt>
<title>How to write a Scribus Plugin</title>
<h2>How to write a Scribus Plugin</h2>
 
<h3>Preface</h3>
163,7 → 165,7
 
<h4>Back to business...</h4>
 
<p>Download the <a href="<?php echo $site_examples_root?>donothingplugin-1.0.tar.gz">example</a>, unpack it and browse it.</p>
<p>Download the <code>donothingplugin-1.0.tar.gz</code> example from http://docs.scribus.net, unpack it and browse it.</p>
<p>When you enter the main directory you can see a lot of files and directories. <b>Warning</b>, do not change anything in the admin directory. It's content is TABOO for you!</p>
<p>As you read the automagic docs (surely) you know that there is an important file in every directory of your project called <code>Makefile.am</code>. Here is a short commented example:</p>
 
193,7 → 195,7
</pre>
</small></td></tr></table></blockquote>
 
<p>Shortly - if you take the <a href="<?php echo $scr_download_root?>donothingplugin-1.0.tar.gz">donothingplugin-1.0.tar.gz</a> file and parse the content (and rename it of course :)) of <code>Makefile.am</code> files you'll get a functional package.</p>
<p>Shortly - if you take the <code>donothingplugin-1.0.tar.gz</code> file and parse the content (and rename it of course :)) of <code>Makefile.am</code> files you'll get a functional package.</p>
<p>There is one more thing to do. You have to specify directory structure in <code>configure.in</code> in the project root directory too:</p>
 
<blockquote><table width="100%" border="1" bgcolor="#eeeeee"><tr><td border="0"><small>
270,4 → 272,5
<h3>Plugin related links</h3>
<a href="http://doc.trolltech.com/">Qt documentation from Trolltech</a><br />
<a href="http://doc.trolltech.com/3.2/qmake-manual.html">QMake documentation from Trolltech</a><br />
<a href="http://www.murrayc.com/learning/linux/automake/automake.shtml">Automake/autoconf example</a><br />
<a href="http://www.murrayc.com/learning/linux/automake/automake.shtml">Automake/autoconf example</a><br />
</qt>
/trunk/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/toolbox8.html
1,4 → 1,6
<h2>Imagemagick </h2>
<qt>
<title>Imagemagick</title>
<h2>Imagemagick</h2>
<p>Is a command-line image converter processor. While it does have a GUI display called Display, it powerful in three ways:</p>
 
<ul><li>A batch conversion application.</li>
5,4 → 7,5
<li>Ability to handle a wide range of image formats.</li>
<li>The newest versions understand color management and use littlecms, just like Scribus.</li></ul>
 
<p>Imagemagick is kind of a black box for image processing, but incredibly powerful when used properly.</p>
<p>Imagemagick is kind of a black box for image processing, but incredibly powerful when used properly.</p>
</qt>
/trunk/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/print3.html
1,3 → 1,5
<qt>
<title>Prepping files for Commercial Printing</title>
<h2>Prepping files for Commercial Printing</h2>
<p>If you have never dealt with printers, nothing will assure a worry free experience for printing files commercially better than talking to your printer well in advance. Preventing mis-understandings and making them well aware in advance of your goals will more than likely prevent 90% of the mistakes. If you do not get satisfactory answers shop around. The printing business is competitive. The best offer both technical savvy and good service. </p>
 
19,3 → 21,5
<p>This can be a determining factor in how you prepare the files. If their RIP is 3015.xxx+, you can be sure their RIP can handle 100% of the features of Scribus. They might not be able to directly answer that, but... </p>
 
<p>Consult <a href="prepress.html">The Pre-Press Notes</a> and you can even take a printed copy of the PDF with you if the has not heard of Scribus. Soon we will have online a listing of printers who support Scribus.</p>
 
</qt>
/trunk/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/importhints.html
1,3 → 1,5
<qt>
<title>Notes on Importing Issues with Scribus</title>
<h2>Notes on Importing Issues with Scribus</h2>
<p>Although Scribus imports most common DTP image formats like TIFF and EPS, over time one of the more difficult tasks in DTP is getting stuff into your layout. Unlike some other DTP programs where printing can be finicky, Scribus print and PDF export has always been very reliable. I can think of
a handful of times when I had crashes or could not get the desired print or PDF from Scribus. With correctly prepared images and files the output from Scribus matches proprietary layout programs.</p>
43,4 → 45,5
<p>A similar issue is the fonts look good on screen, but do not print well. Usually, this is the case of freeware True Type fonts, downloaded from the web. True Type fonts, on average will look better on screen, but may not print with the intended results. However, it takes a huge amount of time and QA to create high-quality fonts, especially correctly hinting True Type fonts. Notice that there are very few high-quality fonts which have been developed in open source. There are a few, but sadly not with the regularity which we see new apps pop up on Freshmeat.</p>
<p>Conversely, the Type 1 fonts included with Ghostscript are not optimized for on-screen appearance, but they usually make excellent printer fonts. The fonts actually were made by URW++, a well regarded type foundry and were donated to the Ghostscript distribution by Artifex. The only issue is when the Nimbus fonts - their true postscript name are often aliased to Times, Helvetica and Courier. This results in a user thinking it is not necessary to embed these fonts as they come standard with Acrobat Reader. Unfortunately, if they are not embedded Acro Reader does a particularly
poor job of emulating these with its built-in multi-master fonts. With Scribus, you will not have this worry, as Scribus uses the correct Postscript name embedded in the font.</p>
<p>The Bitstream fonts included with Xfree86 like Charter and the new Vera fonts are fine fonts for printing. I also like the Utopia family which is actually an Adobe Type 1 font donated by IBM. When creating Scribus docs in PDF form, I pretty much use this family exclusively.</p>
<p>The Bitstream fonts included with Xfree86 like Charter and the new Vera fonts are fine fonts for printing. I also like the Utopia family which is actually an Adobe Type 1 font donated by IBM. When creating Scribus docs in PDF form, I pretty much use this family exclusively.</p>
</qt>
/trunk/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/machints1.html
1,3 → 1,5
<qt>
<title>Mac OSX Hints and Notes</title>
<h2>Mac OSX Hints and Notes</h2>
 
<p><strong>Editor's Note:</strong> These notes are based on advice and notes kindly provided by Martin Costabel. He has done a terrific job of maintaining the Scribus fink package, as well as, providing assistance to fink users on the mailing list. Some of these hints are directed to DTP users who might not have much experience with the vagaries of X11 or its font handling.</p>
38,4 → 40,5
<p>I would avoid using the gimp-freefonts package in Scribus, while they might be fine in other applications.</p>
<p>In addition, Scribus supports Open Type Fonts, but not in the DFONT format that MacOSX uses. You can use <a href="http://fondu.sourceforge.net/">fondu</a>, a tool to convert fonts with resource forks, into a format which can be understood by X11. You are recommended to convert Open Type fonts into True Type/ Open Type fonts, to preserve all the glyphs. (Type 1 fonts are limited to 256 gylphs per font.) </p>
<p>Newer X windows system with the so-called <strong>fontconfig</strong> system have the concept of a personal fonts directory, usually in a hidden directory named <code>.fonts</code>. Scribus can add this and any other directories which contain Type 1 (PC) or True Type / Open Type fonts. Scribus does not need the <code>.afm</code> files for a Type 1 font, just the <code>.pfm</code> files. Scribus obtains the font metrics via freetype2.</p>
<p>To build the latest greatest CVS version, look here: <a href="machints2.html">Mac OSX/Fink &#038; CVS</a></p>
<p>To build the latest greatest CVS version, look here: <a href="machints2.html">Mac OSX/Fink &#038; CVS</a></p>
</qt>
/trunk/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/install1.html
1,3 → 1,5
<qt>
<title>How to obtain the Scribus source</title>
<h2>How to obtain the Scribus source</h2>
<p>You can get the most recent version of Scribus from:</p>
<ul class="simple">
33,4 → 35,5
make -f Makefile.dist
</pre>
</small></td></tr></table></blockquote>
<p>From here, continue with the <a href="install3.html">Compiling and Installing</a> instructions.</p>
<p>From here, continue with the <a href="install3.html">Compiling and Installing</a> instructions.</p>
</qt>
/trunk/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/scripterapi-font.html
1,4 → 1,6
<h2>Font Related Commands </h2>
<qt>
<title>Font Related Commands</title>
<h2>Font Related Commands</h2>
 
<dl>
<dt>GetFontNames()</dt>
9,4 → 11,5
<dt>RenderFont()</dt>
<dd>Creates an image preview of font with given text </dd>
</dl>
</dl>
</qt>
/trunk/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/faq2.html
1,3 → 1,5
<qt>
<title>Miscellaneous Questions</title>
<a name="top"></a>
<h2>Miscellaneous Questions</h2>
<ul>
50,4 → 52,5
<p>Scribus does remember them and will attempt to put them back in the correct place, but depending on the window manager, or on various Qt bugs, it may not work. Eg, it works on Qt 3.1.x, but not on all versions of Qt 3.2.x and Qt 3.3.x</p>
<a href="#top">Back to top</a><hr>
</li>
</ul>
</ul>
</qt>
/trunk/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/scripterapi-object.html
1,3 → 1,5
<qt>
<title>Creating and Destroying Objects</title>
<h2>Creating and Destroying Objects</h2>
 
<dl>
40,4 → 42,5
DeleteObject('Text1')</pre></small></td></tr></table>
</blockquote></dd>
 
</dl>
</dl>
</qt>
/trunk/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/toolbox12.html
1,3 → 1,5
<qt>
<title>A little WINE with Scribus</title>
<h2>A little WINE with Scribus</h2>
<h3>Overview</h3>
<p>One of the facts of life in the desktop publishing world, is the occasional need for working in a cross platform environment. Fortunately, for Linux users in particular, the Wine Project and Codeweavers have made much progress in being able to successfully run many Windows applications on top of Linux.</p>
28,4 → 30,5
 
<h3>Success</h3>
 
<p>Although Acrobat 5.0.5 is not officially supported by Codeweavers, it installs and runs very well. Until the day when Linux/Unix has the same parity in commercial application support, Wine is a good transition strategy. Hopefully, you will find these notes useful in supporting your use of Scribus.</p>
<p>Although Acrobat 5.0.5 is not officially supported by Codeweavers, it installs and runs very well. Until the day when Linux/Unix has the same parity in commercial application support, Wine is a good transition strategy. Hopefully, you will find these notes useful in supporting your use of Scribus.</p>
</qt>
/trunk/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/about1.html
1,3 → 1,5
<qt>
<title>About the Scribus Team</title>
<h2>About the Scribus Team (in order of joining)</h2>
 
<p>Franz Schmid - "Our Linus..." original author, main coder; 40, employee at a mining company; [RedHat, Suse 9.1 - KDE]</p>
39,4 → 41,5
 
<p>Johannes R&#252;schel - Excellent bug finder, German translator; 18, German Civil Service</p>
 
<p>Alexandre Prokoudine - Russian Translator, has helped a bunch with i18n issues.</p>
<p>Alexandre Prokoudine - Russian Translator, has helped a bunch with i18n issues.</p>
</qt>
/trunk/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/pdfexport1.html
1,3 → 1,5
<qt>
<title>PDF Exporting from Scribus</title>
<h2>PDF Exporting from Scribus</h2>
 
<h3>Overview</h3>
13,4 → 15,5
<li><strong>GSview 4.6+</strong> - with the latest version of Ghostscript available. This combination is your best choice for viewing EPS files, PS files and most PDFs. In addition, GSview has many other very useful capabilities with add-ons like <code>pstoedit</code> and <code>epstool</code>. For more detailed notes and hints: <a href="toolbox6.html">GSview</a>. I consider it an essential tool for DTP on Linux.</li>
<li><strong>Xpdf 3.00+</strong> - This updated PDF viewer has a new rendering engine and is capable of viewing PDF 1.5 files.</li>
</ul>
<p><strong>If any other PDF or EPS viewer you choose cannot display PDFs from Scribus, but they do view properly in Acrobat Reader, file a bug with the upstream author. In virtually all cases I have tested, it is a limitation of the viewing application. Scribus PDFs are tested daily with specialist pre-press software to validate their adherence to the published PDF specifications.</strong></p>
<p><strong>If any other PDF or EPS viewer you choose cannot display PDFs from Scribus, but they do view properly in Acrobat Reader, file a bug with the upstream author. In virtually all cases I have tested, it is a limitation of the viewing application. Scribus PDFs are tested daily with specialist pre-press software to validate their adherence to the published PDF specifications.</strong></p>
</qt>
/trunk/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/scripterapi-layer.html
1,4 → 1,6
<h2>Layer related Commands </h2>
<qt>
<title>Layer related Commands</title>
<h2>Layer related Commands</h2>
 
 
<dl>
23,4 → 25,5
<dd>Sets the Layer "layer" to be printable or not. A Value of 1 for "flag" means that the Layer "layer" can be printed, a Value of 0 means that printing the Layer "layer" is disabled. </dd>
<dt>SetLayerVisible("layer", flag) </dt>
<dd>Sets the Layer "layer" to be visible or not. A Value of 1 for "flag" means that the Layer "layer" is visible, a Value of 0 means that the Layer "layer" is invisible. </dd>
</dl>
</dl>
</qt>
/trunk/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/scripterapi-page.html
1,3 → 1,5
<qt>
<title>Page related Commands</title>
<h2>Page related Commands</h2>
 
<dl>
36,4 → 38,5
 
<dt>PageDimension()</dt>
<dd>Returns a tupple with page dimensions in chosen measurements type (see e.g. GetUnit())</dd>
</dl>
</dl>
</qt>
/trunk/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/parallel-install.html
1,4 → 1,6
<h2>How to install more than one version of Scribus on one computer </h2>
<qt>
<title>How to install more than one version of Scribus on one computer</title>
<h2>How to install more than one version of Scribus on one computer</h2>
 
<p>Imagine a situation when you have one Scribus already installed. It's likely possible because of Scribus quality, usability and presence in a wide amount of distributions :)</p>
<p>And then the day came. The day you read about <em><strong>the magnificent feature</strong></em> implemented in CVS. You really want to try it but you're afraid of the possible problems with untested code etc, so you don't want to replace your stable installed package.</p>
27,4 → 29,5
make install
</pre>
</small></td></tr></table></blockquote>
<p>When it's done, you can run the new Scribus by <code>~/scribus_cvs/bin/scribus</code></p>
<p>When it's done, you can run the new Scribus by <code>~/scribus_cvs/bin/scribus</code></p>
</qt>
/trunk/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/javascriptpdf.html
1,7 → 1,9
<qt>
<title>Enhancing Scribus PDF with JavaScript</title>
<h2>Enhancing Scribus PDF with JavaScript</h2>
<p>Scribus has very complete support for adding interactive features to PDF. This is enabled via dialog boxes in the field properties and by adding JavaScript based functions attached to PDF buttons and text fields. The best way to demonstrate this is via PDFs which have these features:</p>
<p><a href="<?php echo $site_pdfs_root; ?>javascriptpdfus.pdf">Javascripting PDF US Letter</a> (240 kb) or <a href="<?php echo $site_pdfs_root; ?>javascriptpdfa4.pdf">Javascripting PDF A4</a> (240
kb) are step by step guides for beginning to enhance PDF with Javascript.</p>
<p>The "Javascripting PDF US Letter" or "Javascripting PDF A4" from http://docs.scribus.net are step by step guides for beginning to enhance PDF with Javascript.</p>
<p>After reading this PDF tutorial, the next section, PDF Web Forms walks you through the step by step creation of a web based PDF form with a sample .php snippet to read the submitted data.</p>
<p>This is best viewed by Acrobat Reader 5.x downloaded and run outside of a browser. You can typically right click the links to the PDF and <em>Save As.*</em>. to save the file locally. Other PDF viewers do not have the Javascript support to view this properly.</p>
<p>This is best viewed by Acrobat Reader 5.x downloaded and run outside of a browser. You can typically right click the links to the PDF and <em>Save As.*</em>. to save the file locally. Other PDF viewers do not have the Javascript support to view this properly.</p>
</qt>
/trunk/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/scripterapi-color.html
1,4 → 1,6
<h2>Color related Commands </h2>
<qt>
<title>Color related Commands</title>
<h2>Color related Commands</h2>
 
<dl>
<dt>ChangeColor("name", c, m, y, k) </dt>
18,4 → 20,5
<dt>ReplaceColor("name", "replace")</dt>
<dd>Every occurence of that Color is replaced by the Color "replace".</dd>
</dl>
</dl>
</qt>
/trunk/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/importhints2.html
1,3 → 1,5
<qt>
<title>Advanced Importing Tricks with Scribus</title>
<h2>Advanced Importing Tricks with Scribus</h2>
<p>As I said in the previous page, one of the more difficult tasks in DTP is getting stuff <em>into</em> your layout. Below are some hints I developed while working with the new SVG importer. Among the reasons I like SVG import is: Scribus can edit it and it can be color managed very easily. It is compact and the resultant PDFs are also small. Imported SVGs print superbly.</p>
<p>Background: I had agreed to give a presentation to a local tech group made up of mostly MS based web developers. My topic was PDF and the web. My aim was to show where PDF files could be integrated into web content. I had decided I wanted to show off Scribus and the power of open source web development tools to these folks via a &#034;presentation&#034; PDF.</p>
11,11 → 13,10
<p>Franz had the original logo as an EPS, thankfully. However, part of the logo in the EPS was a bitmap. The secret weapon was <code>pstoedit</code>, a command line tool which can converts bitmaps EPS and PS files into all kinds of different vector formats. When installed correctly, you can use this as kind of a plug-in to GSview.</p>
<p>Open Scribus EPS logo file in GSview. Go Edit > Convert to Vector and this dialog pops up:</p>
 
<div style="text-align: center"><img src="<?php echo $scr_shots_root; ?>ps2edit1.png" alt="pstoedit"/></div><br />
<table width="100%"><tr><td align="center"><img src="images/ps2edit1.png" alt="pstoedit"/></td></tr></table><br />
 
<p>Looking down the long list of export file formats, which is impressive, I found Sketch, which can export SVG. So I selected that and checked <strong>Text to polygons</strong>. Why? SVG text handling is tricky and not completely finished in Sketch or Sodipodi. Then, GSview blinked a blank screen and then I had a .sk or Sketch file. I opened this in Sketch and all looked well, so export SVG from Sketch then import Scribus. Perfect. No, not yet. Some of the elements did not export quite as expected and would not appear in the SVG. (At this point the SVG importer was a week old, so I chalked it up to bugs or missing features, but later I found this was <strong>not</strong> the case. Scribus does fine job importing <em>well-formed</em> SVG.)</p>
<p> So, on a hunch I opened up the same SVG in Sodipodi and re-saved. Then re-import, better but not perfect. Then in Sodipodi, I realized there is an option to <strong>Save as Plain SVG</strong>. OK, we are almost home. I could clearly see the elements in the group, but a few were blank. So, in Scribus, I un-grouped all the elements in the imported SVG and selected the blank ones. Interestingly, I found in the drawing editor palette, some of the paths were not yet closed. Click on the close path and voila, the colors appeared. A few minutes of clicking and closing paths and I had the Scribus logo in Scribus, as SVG. Mission accomplished.
</p>
<p> So, on a hunch I opened up the same SVG in Sodipodi and re-saved. Then re-import, better but not perfect. Then in Sodipodi, I realized there is an option to <strong>Save as Plain SVG</strong>. OK, we are almost home. I could clearly see the elements in the group, but a few were blank. So, in Scribus, I un-grouped all the elements in the imported SVG and selected the blank ones. Interestingly, I found in the drawing editor palette, some of the paths were not yet closed. Click on the close path and voila, the colors appeared. A few minutes of clicking and closing paths and I had the Scribus logo in Scribus, as SVG. Mission accomplished.</p>
 
<p>I used the same trick to import tables in a PDF into Scribus. One of the Scribus users on the list was trying to use Scribus in place of InDesign. In testing, one of the issues was the lack of table support in Scribus and InDesign does have good support for tables. So, again pstoedit, Sketch and Sodipodi came to the rescue.</p>
<p>I got the InDesign file, which could have been reproduced in Scribus, but just a very time consuming job. So, from InDesign, exported a PDF 1.3, nice and simple. Then open the PDF in GSview. Use the pstoedit plug-in to again convert it into a Sketch file. Open Sketch and the file is perfect on screen. Export SVG. Open in Scribus, we're almost there. Reopen the SVG in Sodipodi, re-save as plain SVG. Import into Scribus. Results: a perfect mirror of the original PDF.</p>
23,4 → 24,5
 
<p><strong><em>Lessons:</em></strong> First, <strong>pstoedit</strong> is a really remarkable tool which is made much easier to use via GSview. The conversion quality, just with the defaults was amazing. The curves in the Scribus EPS matched the SVG perfectly - colors too. Second, re-saving a complex image format in an application which is different from the one which created it sometimes has an effect of "cleaning up" a file. The opposite can also be true in my experience. Third, do not be afraid to experiment a bit, especially with SVG. SVG is wonderful file format with many capabilities. However, it is relatively new and no application open source or commercial has perfected its import or export. Moreover, no one vector editor can support the entire SVG spec.</p>
 
<p>So, now you know why SVG is my new favorite file format.</p>
<p>So, now you know why SVG is my new favorite file format.</p>
</qt>
/trunk/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/scripterapi-textframes.html
1,4 → 1,6
<h2>Handling Text Frames </h2>
<qt>
<title>Handling Text Frames</title>
<h2>Handling Text Frames</h2>
 
<dl>
<dt>DeleteText(["name"])</dt>
72,4 → 74,5
<dt>SetTextShade(shade, ["name"])</dt>
<dd>Sets the shading of the Text Color of the Object "name" to "shade", if there is some Text selected only the selected Text is changed. "shade" must be an Integer Value in the range from 0 (lightest) to 100 (full Color intensity). If "name" is not given the currently selected Item is used.</dd>
</dl>
</dl>
</qt>
/trunk/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/download.html
1,4 → 1,7
<qt>
<title>Scribus Downloads</title>
<h2>Scribus Downloads</h2>
 
<p><strong>After downloading, please verify the signature of the files using <code>md5sum</code> to check the file matches the following:</strong></p>
 
<table cellpadding="1" cellspacing="1" border="1">
34,7 → 37,7
<li><b>RH/Fedora Development Package</b> - http://www.scribus.org.uk/downloads/1.2/scribus-devel-1.2-0.fdr.1.2.i686.rpm</li>
<li><b>RHEL i686 RPM</b> - http://www.scribus.org.uk/downloads/1.2/scribus-1.2-0.fdr.1.EL3.i686.rpm</li>
<li><b>RHEL Development Package</b> - http://www.scribus.org.uk/downloads/1.2/scribus-devel-1.2-0.fdr.1.EL3.i686.rpm</li>
<li><b>Debian .deb</b> - http://www.scribus.org.uk/downloads/deb/binary/scribus_1.2.0-1_i386.deb</li>
<li><b>Debian .deb</b> - http://www.scribus.org.uk/downloads/deb/binary/scribus_1.2.0-1_i386.deb or <a href="install-dpkg.html">apt-get setup</a></li>
</ul>
<ul>
<li><b>Extra Document Templates</b> - http://www.scribus.org.uk/downloads/1.2/scribus-temp-all-1.2.tar.bz2</li>
46,4 → 49,5
<li><b>tar.bz2</b> - http://web2.altmuehlnet.de/fschmid/scribus-1.2.tar.bz2</li>
<li><b>Extra Document Templates</b> - http://web2.altmuehlnet.de/fschmid/scribus-temp-all-1.2.tar.bz2</li>
<li><b>Translation source files</b> (not needed for Scribus usage) - http://web2.altmuehlnet.de/fschmid/scribus-po-files.tar.bz2</a></li>
</ul>
</ul>
</qt>
/trunk/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/toolbox1.html
1,3 → 1,5
<qt>
<title>Adobe Acrobat Reader</title>
<h2>Adobe Acrobat Reader</h2>
<h4>Using "Hidden" Features with Acrobat Reader and Scribus</h4>
 
11,22 → 13,22
</small></td></tr></table></blockquote>
<p>First, make sure you have version 5.0.8 or later for Linux. This version is vastly better than 4.0.5, even with above mentioned bugs - more stable, faster loading, better printing, and more accurate color. If you are running Red Hat 8.0 or newer+, the easiest way to install Acro Reader is to get the RPMS from Guru Labs. The place to get Acrobat Reader, if your distribution does not offer an rpm, deb or other package is from Adobe.</p>
<p>Next, once you get it installed and working, open Acrobat Reader, click through the usual license stuff and select: <strong>Edit &#062; Preferences &#062; General</strong> and you will have a dialog like the one below:</p>
<div style="text-align: center"><img src="<?php echo $scr_shots_root; ?>acro1.png" alt="Acrobat Reader General Preferences" /></div>
<table width="100%"><tr><td align="center"><img src="images/acro1.png" alt="Acrobat Reader General Preferences" /></td></tr></table>
<p>This dialog is <strong>very</strong> important to set up properly for optimized viewing Scribus created PDFs. <strong>Display Edge to Edge</strong> will give you a larger viewing area to view your PDF. <strong>Smooth Text, Smooth Line Art and Smooth Images</strong> applies a bit of anti-aliasing when viewing. If you send someone a Scribus created PDF and they complain the text or gradients) look like barbed wire or are "banded", advise the user to enable these settings which are common on all later versions of Acrobat Reader - regardless of platform. There are other cross- platform fonts hints in the PDF Export Options section. <strong>Cool Type</strong> is a feature specific for making PDF readable on LCD laptop screens. It is a way of adjusting the anti-aliasing and sub-pixel rendering. Otherwise, leave it unchecked.</p>
<p>If you are creating Scribus files with transparency effects and export PDF 1.4 (PDF 1.3 does not support transparency), you can enable <strong>Show Transparency Grid</strong>. The other options are mostly for the web browser plug-in. I find splash screens a bother, so I leave that unchecked.</p>
<div style="text-align: center"><img src="<?php echo $scr_shots_root; ?>acro3.png" alt="Acrobat Reader Screen shot" title="Acrobat Reader Screenshot" /></div>
<table width="100%"><tr><td align="center"><img src="images/acro3.png" alt="Acrobat Reader Screen shot" title="Acrobat Reader Screenshot" /></td></tr></table>
<p>Next, looking at the Reader window above, there are 3 features which can be useful:</p>
<ol>
<li><strong>Thumbnails (which Scribus can optionally embed in the PDF when exporting) are useful for navigating.</strong> </li>
<li><strong>The corner triangle</strong> is a short cut to <strong>View &#062; Document Info, Document Fonts, Document Security</strong>.</li>
<li><strong>Notes, which are non-printing, can be used to give definitions or hints in a document.</strong> What we care about is document information. Within Scribus <strong>File &#062; Document Information</strong> there is a panel to enter author and title of the document. This shows up in a panel below:</li> </ol>
<div style="text-align: center"><img alt="Acrobat Reader General Info Panel" src="<?php echo $scr_shots_root; ?>acroinfo.png" /></div>
<table width="100%"><tr><td align="center"><img alt="Acrobat Reader General Info Panel" src="images/acroinfo.png" /></td></tr></table>
<p>This shows the document size, date of creation and creating application. This information is automatically embedded. Scribus can optionally add author and document title. In addition, this shows Dublin Core RDF (Resource Definition Format) and document security strength.</p>
<p><strong>Document Security.</strong> Scribus has the ability to encrypt a document with specific user rights. If you enable Security in the PDF export dialog, when you export PDF 1.3, encryption is 40 bit strength.</p>
 
<div style="text-align: center"><img src="<?php echo $scr_shots_root; ?>acropass.png" alt="Password Dialog for Opening a Protected PDF" title="Password Dialog for Opening a Protected PDF" /></div>
<table width="100%"><tr><td align="center"><img src="images/acropass.png" alt="Password Dialog for Opening a Protected PDF" title="Password Dialog for Opening a Protected PDF" /></td></tr></table>
<p>If you export a PDF 1.4 file, encryption is 128 bit strength:</p>
<div style="text-align: center"><img alt="Acrobat Reader Security Panel" src="<?php echo $scr_shots_root; ?>acrosec.png" /></div>
<table width="100%"><tr><td align="center"><img alt="Acrobat Reader Security Panel" src="images/acrosec.png" /></td></tr></table>
<p><strong>Annotations</strong> are non-printing notes which Scribus can optionally embed within a PDF. This is really simple. Create a text frame. Then add your notes and right click, select PDF Options and check "Is PDF Annotation".</p>
<p>For other "hidden" features, read through the online help, which is actually a PDF. Beginning with page 10, there are a number of less well known features, including the console command line options. The command line options are specific to Linux/Unix and include some neat options to export PDF into Postscript. There also hints on settings specific to Acrobat Reader in <code>~/Xdefaults</code>.</p>
<p><strong>Advanced Settings</strong> - Unfortunately, Adobe did not enable a graphical UI choice for enabling/disabling local fonts. What this means Acrobat will use locally installed fonts which are named in the PDF, if it can find them in your font path. In your home directory is a .acrobat/prefs file. Make a backup copy then open this file in a text editor. Almost at the end you are looking for this line:</p>
33,4 → 35,5
<blockquote><table width="100%" border="1" bgcolor="#eeeeee"><tr><td border="0"><small>
<pre>/avpUseLocalFonts [/b true]</pre>
</small></td></tr></table></blockquote>
<p>I recommend you set this to false for use with Scribus. Why? As is often the case PDFs you create in Scribus will be sent to other users who are not running on Linux. What you will want in this case is realistic view without your fonts. Thus, the only reliable way of ensuring your doc will view properly anywhere is to embed the fonts. You can subset them in the font preferences panel to save file size. This particularly important when using the Ghostscript fonts, like the Nimbus family. Acrobat Reader does a poor job of simulating them with its own built-in multi-master fonts.</p>
<p>I recommend you set this to false for use with Scribus. Why? As is often the case PDFs you create in Scribus will be sent to other users who are not running on Linux. What you will want in this case is realistic view without your fonts. Thus, the only reliable way of ensuring your doc will view properly anywhere is to embed the fonts. You can subset them in the font preferences panel to save file size. This particularly important when using the Ghostscript fonts, like the Nimbus family. Acrobat Reader does a poor job of simulating them with its own built-in multi-master fonts.</p>
</qt>
/trunk/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/developers.html
1,0 → 0,0
<qt>
<title></title>
<p>For Developers</p>
 
</qt>
/trunk/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/resources.html
1,6 → 1,9
<qt>
<title>Community Resources</title>
<h2>Community Resources</h2>
<p>The <strong>Scribus mailing list</strong> is on-line at <a href="http://nashi.altmuehlnet.de/mailman/listinfo/scribus">http://nashi.altmuehlnet.de/mailman/listinfo/scribus</a>. There is both an English and German language interface to the mailing list manager. This is for both end-user support and development issues.</p>
<p>The <strong>Bug Tracker</strong> is located at <a href="http://bugs.scribus.net/">http://bugs.scribus.net/</a></p>
<p>An IRC channel <strong>#scribus</strong> on <strong>freenode.net</strong> is quite active. There is usually at least one person from the core development team present there.</p>
<p>There are <a href="http://www.yeccoe.org/scribus/">French</a> and <a href="http://www.bomots.de/scribus/">German</a> Scribus documentation sites. French and German versions of this website are making progress and will be viewable at this address.</p>
<p>There is a Polish translation of the "Get Started with Scribus" tutorial at <A href=" http://linux.hanski.info/static/scribus/index.html">http://linux.hanski.info/static/scribus/index.html</A></p>
<p>There is a Polish translation of the "Get Started with Scribus" tutorial at <A href=" http://linux.hanski.info/static/scribus/index.html">http://linux.hanski.info/static/scribus/index.html</A></p>
</qt>
/trunk/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/toolbox5.html
1,3 → 1,5
<qt>
<title>Ghostscript - Black Box Magic</title>
<h2>Ghostscript - Black Box Magic</h2>
 
<p>For those not familiar, Ghostscript strictly defined is a PostScript interpreter and many programs use GS for PostScript conversions and import/export. Likewise, Scribus uses Ghostscript, sometimes using some of the most advanced features available only in newer versions. </p>
10,3 → 12,5
 
<p>The next generation of GS will have a new ink jet driver <strong>rinkj</strong>, which has some new techniques for optimal printing with some ink jet printers. Plus, support for jpeg2000 aka jasper, for lossless jpeg compression and PDF 1.5. Also, there are new devices which will support many advanced pre-press and printing features. Scribus will be one of the first applications to take advantage of these improvements. Thus, we always encourage you to have the latest Ghostscript available for your system and encourage distributions to migrate to GPL Ghostscript 8.x. </p>
 
 
</qt>
/trunk/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/fonts3.html
1,3 → 1,5
<qt>
<title>CJK, Indic Script and Other non-Latin Fonts</title>
<h2>CJK, Indic Script and Other non-Latin Fonts</h2>
 
<p>CJK (Chinese, Japanese, Korean) usage in Scribus is possible. Actually, except for adding KOIR-8 encodings, not much has been done to support CJK fonts (yet). However, some users have reported some success, including using exported PDFs for commercial print jobs. Thanks to QT's excellent Unicode support, already some of the work is done.</p>
28,4 → 30,5
<li>When viewing in Acrobat Reader, enable the preference for smooth artwork display. See the <a href="toolbox1.html">Acrobat Reader section</a>.</li>
<li>If you are exporting to SVG, conversion of text to postscript outlines is almost always more satisfactory.</li>
<li>Some Unicode fonts are quite large and will slow launching Scribus significantly. You should expect higher memory usage as well. Scribus does some very needed sanity checks on fonts upon loading.</li>
</ul>
</ul>
</qt>
/trunk/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/toolbox9.html
1,3 → 1,5
<qt>
<title>Inkscape</title>
<h2>Inkscape</h2>
<p><em>Disclaimer: I am technically one of the Inkscape Team members, though mostly to liaise with them and build rpms. However, I would not bother a: If Inkscape was not such a terrific application with a really bright future. b: The Inkscape Team was not a really great bunch to work with. Inkscape&#039;s development is an excellent model for OSS developers to follow.</em></p>
 
9,4 → 11,5
 
<p>For the most part, Inkscape SVG artwork will import into Scribus easily. There are some SVG features which are not yet supported by Scribus (patterns), however 99% of the time, It Just Works TM. If a file does not seem to import correctly into Scribus, try saving as &#034;Plain SVG&#034; within Inkscape. One other hint for working with Inkscape SVG is the SVG model for working with text is far different than the PDF/PostScript model. (One of the few weak spots in the spec in my opinion.) Save text input and text effects for Scribus. Scribus does a very good job of offering you a multitude of text effects and it will output them faithfully. Scribus uses the freetype2 libraries and this gives you a wide range of effects.</p>
 
<p>That does not mean Inkscape does it wrong. Only that the way it is done in SVG and within a PostScript oriented application are sometimes very different and difficult to translate from one to the other. Actually, Inkscape does an excellent job of support for SVG font features including kerning and other advanced features.</p>
<p>That does not mean Inkscape does it wrong. Only that the way it is done in SVG and within a PostScript oriented application are sometimes very different and difficult to translate from one to the other. Actually, Inkscape does an excellent job of support for SVG font features including kerning and other advanced features.</p>
</qt>
/trunk/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/hyphenator.html
1,3 → 1,5
<qt>
<title>Hyphenation - Type Hints</title>
<h2>Hyphenation - Type Hints</h2>
<h3>Introduction</h3>
<p>This feature adds sophisticated hyphenation control for text formatting within Scribus. Based on code from both Tex and Open Office, it has a time tested algorithm for selecting syllables within words.</p>
5,15 → 7,15
<h3>Usage</h3>
<p>Hyphenation. Select a text frame, Adjust the text alignment you wish and then select Hyphenation &#062; Hyphenate Text from the menu. Automatic, means just that - select a text frame and Hyphenate &#062; Hyphenate Text sets this very similarly to applying a Style. Changing the font, kerning or font size will automatically redraw the text and reapply the hyphenation automatically.</p>
 
<div style="text-align: center"><img src="<?php echo $scr_shots_root; ?>hyphen1.png" align="center" alt="Hyphenator Settings Dialog" /></div>
<table width="100%"><tr><td align="center"><img src="images/hyphen1.png" align="center" alt="Hyphenator Settings Dialog" /></td></tr></table>
 
<p>For most purposes, the settings can be left at the default - Automatic - and then you can simply apply hyphenation by selecting the text box and then Hyphenation &#062; Hyphenate Text from the menu. You can also allow Scribus to automatically hyphenate as you type.</p>
 
<div style="text-align: center"><img src="<?php echo $scr_shots_root; ?>hyphen2.png" align="center" alt="Possible Hyphenation Dialog" title="Possible Hyphenation Dialog" /></div>
<table width="100%"><tr><td align="center"><img src="images/hyphen2.png" align="center" alt="Possible Hyphenation Dialog" title="Possible Hyphenation Dialog" /></td></tr></table>
 
<p>When set to manual, you also have the option to over ride possible hyphenation word by word, as shown in figure below.</p>
 
<div style="text-align: center"><img src="<?php echo $scr_shots_root; ?>hyphen3.png" align="center" alt="Possible Hyphenation Dialog" title="Possible Hyphenation Dialog" /></div>
<table width="100%"><tr><td align="center"><img src="images/hyphen3.png" align="center" alt="Possible Hyphenation Dialog" title="Possible Hyphenation Dialog" /></td></tr></table>
 
<p>There is a sample document included with the documentation <code>hyphen.scd.gz</code> which gives a short demo of the differences when you layout a columns of text.</p>
 
20,4 → 22,5
<p>You will probably have the best appearance from formatting your text as <strong>Block(justified)</strong>.</p>
 
<p>Currently, there are hyphenation dictionaries in Catalan, Czech, Danish, English, Finnish
French, German, Greek, Irish (Gaelic), Italian, Hungarian, Lithuanian, Polish, Portuguese, Russian, Slovak, Slovenian, Spanish, Swedish and Ukrainian.</p>
French, German, Greek, Irish (Gaelic), Italian, Hungarian, Lithuanian, Polish, Portuguese, Russian, Slovak, Slovenian, Spanish, Swedish and Ukrainian.</p>
</qt>
/trunk/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/scribusfileformat.html
1,3 → 1,5
<qt>
<title>File Format Specification for Scribus 1.2</title>
<h2>File Format Specification for Scribus 1.2</h2>
<p>This specifcation is based on the current format used by Scribus 1.2.
<p>It lists all Tags and Attributes, some of these are optional, depending on type of the Document. Optional Tags and Attributes are marked with a slight blue background, Scribus will insert a default value when one of these are missing.</p>
2976,4 → 2978,5
1 = Superscript<br>2 = Subscript<br>4 = Outlined<br>8 = Underlined<br>
16 = Strikeout<br>64 = Small Caps<br>128 = Word can be hyphenated here</td>
</tr>
</table>
</table>
</qt>
/trunk/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/scripterapi.html
1,3 → 1,5
<qt>
<title>The Available Commands</title>
<h2>The Available Commands</h2>
 
<p>The Plugin installs a buildin Module "scribus". Thus to use the extensions to the Python language you must do a "import scribus" or "from scribus import *".</p>
15,4 → 17,5
<p>Variables in angled Brackets are optional.</p>
 
Almost all methods or functions have error strings implemented so you can see "quick help" when you call it in the wrong way.
<div style="text-align: center"><img src="<?php echo $scr_shots_root; ?>Scripter_error_string.png" alt="Sample Scripter Error" title="Sample Scripter Error" /></div>
<table width="100%"><tr><td align="center"><img src="images/Scripter_error_string.png" alt="Sample Scripter Error" title="Sample Scripter Error" /></td></tr></table>
</qt>
/trunk/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/scripterapi-doc.html
1,3 → 1,5
<qt>
<title>Document related Commands</title>
<h2>Document related Commands</h2>
 
<dl>
64,4 → 66,5
3 = Picas
</blockquote>
</dd>
</dl>
</dl>
</qt>
/trunk/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/machints2.html
1,3 → 1,5
<qt>
<title>Mac OSX Hints and Notes - CVS</title>
<h2>Mac OSX Hints and Notes - CVS</h2>
 
<p><strong>Editor's Note:</strong> These notes are based on advice and notes kindly provided by Martin Costabel, who has done a terrific job of maintaining the Scribus fink package, as well as, providing assistance to fink users on the mailing list.</p>
97,4 → 99,5
sudo make install
</pre>
</small></td></tr></table></blockquote>
<p>It installs scribus into <code>/usr/local</code>, so it does not interfere with a different version installed by Fink, which goes into <code>/sw</code>.</p>
<p>It installs scribus into <code>/usr/local</code>, so it does not interfere with a different version installed by Fink, which goes into <code>/sw</code>.</p>
</qt>
/trunk/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/install2.html
1,3 → 1,5
<qt>
<title>>Requirements</title>
<h2>Requirements</h2>
<p>The programs you will need to compile Scribus are:</p>
<ol>
20,7 → 22,7
of the Scribus developers runs Gnome. The author of this documentation has
made a point of testing each release of Scribus under Blackbox as well.
This has shown no incompatibilities or problems for Scribus, except for
the loss of drop and drag functionality.</p>
the loss of drag and drop functionality.</p>
<p>If color management does not work, you may not have installed the
development libraries for littlecms. When downloading the package from
littlecms the make files are already configured for Linux, so compiling is
42,4 → 44,5
with CUPS.</li>
<li>Gimp Print development librairies - Scribus now directly supports the
Gimp Print plug-in with CUPS.</li>
</ul>
</ul>
</qt>
/trunk/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/scripterapi-manobj.html
1,4 → 1,6
<h2>Manipulating Objects </h2>
<qt>
<title>Manipulating Objects</title>
<h2>Manipulating Objects</h2>
 
<dl>
<dt>GroupObjects([list])</dt>
32,4 → 34,5
TextFlowsAroundFrame(objname, 1) # causes the text flows around the object</pre>
</small></td></tr></table></blockquote>
</dd>
</dl>
</dl>
</qt>
/trunk/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/faq3.html
1,3 → 1,5
<qt>
<title>Development Questions</title>
<a name="top"></a>
<h2>Development Questions</h2>
<ul>
35,4 → 37,5
<p>Glad you asked. There is a <a href="codingstandards.html">Scribus Coding section</a> which outlines coding style and recommendations for code submissions.</p>
<a href="#top">Back to top</a><hr>
</li>
</ul>
</ul>
</qt>
/trunk/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/toolbox13.html
1,3 → 1,5
<qt>
<title>Xnview</title>
<h2>Xnview</h2>
<p>There are loads of image previewer/thumb nailing applications from some web based - even Konqueror and Nautilus have some of these features. </p>
 
7,4 → 9,5
<ol><li>Its very fast, as fast or faster than some similar proprietary apps. </li>
<li>It handles a wide array of image formats with very good conversion capabilities. There are some real obscure file formats Xnview can open and convert. It's probable that only Imagemagick can handle more. I've found it very stable and worth at least adding to your toolbox.</li></ol>
 
<div style="text-align: center"><img src="<?php echo $scr_shots_root; ?>xnview.png" align="center" alt="Xnview" /></div>
<table width="100%"><tr><td align="center"><img src="images/xnview.png" align="center" alt="Xnview" /></td></tr></table>
</qt>
/trunk/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/about2.html
1,3 → 1,5
<qt>
<title>Scribus Basics</title>
<h2>Scribus Basics</h2>
<h3>Why DTP is different from Word Processing</h3>
 
18,11 → 20,10
<p><i>Workflow</i>, means in the DTP world a way of assembling both the files to be used, but also some forethought on where and how your document will be printed or used. If for example, you were planning on creating a brochure for your business, you certainly would want to have it commercially printed. Thus, you would be sadly mistaken if you thought you could take the low resolution jpegs from your website and use them in Scribus directly. Web and print have two different objectives. <b><i>Graphics used on a website are almost always unusable for commercial printing.</i></b> You need <b>much</b> higher resolution graphics. File size should almost always be secondary to image quality when considering commercial print needs.</p>
<p>A Simple DTP Workflow:</p>
<ol>
<li>Make a simple sketch on paper of the basic layout.. This helps to visualize how to mix text, artwork and images.</p>
<li>Make a simple sketch on paper of the basic layout.. This helps to visualize how to mix text, artwork and images.</li>
<li>Get images collected as needed, preferably high 200dpi or more saved as TIFFs or PNG. Get your artwork (illustrations or line art in a suitable import format. SVG is usually the best option.</li>
<li>Write out the text in a word processor or text editor. Spell check, double check grammar etc.</li>
<li>Collect all these files in a project directory and start building
your document in Scribus.</li>
<li>Collect all these files in a project directory and start building your document in Scribus.</li>
</ol>
<p>In a commercial setting, this might be far more complex. In my experience, using similar methods will allow the planning and structure tothe planning and structure make sense and greatly enhances productivity.</p>
<p>Lastly, Workflow similarly takes into consideration the many options when exporting PDF or printing. There are extensive notes about this in the chapter PDF Export. Scribus has many advanced printing features, which are atypical of desktop applications. Make sure <b>Tool Tips</b> are enabled, to get general guidance and/or read the Printing Section carefully to understand the options.
37,4 → 38,6
ways which preserve their appearance at any scale. The preferred way to import them into Scribus is via EPS (Encapsulated Post Script) or via SVG (Scalable Vector Graphics) The advantage of SVG is Scribus imports this into native editable objects and can re-edit almost every features in SVG. The importer can import almost every type of SVG from the W3C test suite, excepting multimedia features and scripted actions for Win32 plug-ins in a browser.</p>
<p>One other way you can import files into Scribus is via PDF. Scribus will use Ghostscript to create a high resolution image with a lower resolution file for preview on screen. This is more appropriate for drawings and images versus text. If you need just the text from a PDF, you can open in Adobe Acrobat Reader and copy and paste from the clipboard. Note: you can only import one page of a PDF at a time, and you cannot yet edit imported PDFsnor can you edit PDFs created with another application.</p>
<p>Once you have assembled all these bits, it is time to begin working in Scribus. For previous users of desktop publishing, launching Scribus for the first time will seem comfortable and familiar.
</p>
</p>
 
</qt>
/trunk/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/pdfexport2.html
1,3 → 1,5
<qt>
<title>PDF Exporting from Scribus</title>
<h2>PDF Exporting from Scribus</h2>
<h3>Scribus PDF Export Workflow</h3>
 
15,4 → 17,5
<li>
<p><strong>Print Optimized</strong> - This would mean targeting the PDF for printing on an office laser jet or ink jet. Recommended settings: down-sample all images to 300 dpi or less, embed fonts and keep your page margins with enough tolerance for margin limits on desktop and common office laser printers (approx. 6/10th of an inch or 15cm.)</p>
</li>
</ol>
</ol>
</qt>
/trunk/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/doccopyright.html
1,3 → 1,5
<qt>
<title>Copyright Notice and Publication License</title>
<h2>Copyright Notice and Publication License</h2>
 
<p>This copyright notice concerns the online and packaged version of: Scribus Help Manual, originally by Peter Linnell with the assistance of Franz Schmid, the main programmer of Scribus. Further additions by the rest of the Scribus team composed of Craig Bradney, Paul Johnson, Riku Leino, Petr Vanek). Original site design based on site design of the <a href="http://www.inkscape.org">Inkscape</a> website.</p>
59,3 → 61,5
<h3>VI. ELECTED OPTIONS</h3>
 
<p>1) Distribution of the work or derivative of the work in any standard (paper) book form is prohibited unless prior permission is obtained from the copyright holder. Other forms of distribution including CD-ROM, electronic, and magnetic media are permitted.</p>
 
</qt>
/trunk/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/docchanges.html
1,4 → 1,6
<h2>Changelog of docs.scribus.net</h2>
<qt>
<title>Changelog of Documentation</title>
<h2>Changelog of Documentation</h2>
 
<ul>
<li>28 08 2004 : Launch of docs.scribus.net with Scribus 1.2 release.</li>
9,4 → 11,5
<li>02 09 2004 : Updated <a href="scripter1.html">Scripter</a> and <a href="scripterapi.html">Scripter API</a> files</li>
<li>08 09 2004 : Addition of <a href="print3.html">Preparing for Press</a> </li>
<li>25 09 2004 : Addition of <a href="fonts3.html">Non-Latin Fonts</a> </li>
</ul>
</ul>
</qt>
/trunk/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/menu.xml
25,7 → 25,7
</submenuitem>
<submenuitem text="Setup" file="settings1.html">
<submenuitem text="Keyboard Shortcuts" file="keys.html"/>
<submenuitem text="Hypehnation" file="hyphenator.html"/>
<submenuitem text="Hyphenation" file="hyphenator.html"/>
<submenuitem text="Font Setup" file="fonts1.html"/>
<submenuitem text="Fonts in Depth" file="fonts2.html"/>
<submenuitem text="Non-Latin Fonts" file="fonts3.html"/>
39,7 → 39,7
<submenuitem text="PDF 1.3 and 1.4" file=".html"/>
<submenuitem text="PDF/X-3" file="pdfx3.html"/>
<submenuitem text="PDF Forms" file="pdfexport3.html"/>
<submenuitem text="PDF Forms and PHP" file=".html"/>
<submenuitem text="PDF Forms and PHP" file="pdf_form.html"/>
<submenuitem text="PDF and Javascript" file="javascriptpdf.html"/>
<submenuitem text="PDF Presentations" file="pdfexport4.html"/>
</submenuitem>
51,7 → 51,6
</submenuitem>
<submenuitem text="Color Management" file="cms.html">
<submenuitem text="Monitor Profiling" file="moncal.html"/>
<submenuitem text="Corel PhotoPaint" file="corelphoto.html"/>
</submenuitem>
<submenuitem text="DTP ToolBox" file="toolbox.html">
<submenuitem text="Acrobat Reader" file="toolbox1.html"/>
/trunk/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/contributions.html
1,3 → 1,5
<qt>
<title>Contributions to the documentation<</title>
<h2>Contributions to the documentation</h2>
 
<p>This documentation website is the second generation of the Scribus documentation. The initial documents that these were developed from were written by Peter Linnell with help from Franz Schmid. As the Scribus team has grown, and the various contributions from other people has also grown, we have seen a number of additions and updates. The following table attempts to list in alphabetical order the main contributors to the documentations. Hopefully we dont miss any of you out (if so, please contact us and we will add you in):
21,4 → 23,5
<tr bgcolor="#dddddd"><td>Name</td><td>Language(s)</td></tr>
<tr bgcolor="#eeeeee"><td>Frederic Dubuy</td><td>French</td></tr>
<tr bgcolor="#eeeeee"><td>Johannes R&#252;schel</td><td>German</td></tr>
</table>
</table>
</qt>
/trunk/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/prepress.html
1,3 → 1,6
<qt>
<title>Pre-Press and Service Bureau Considerations with Scribus PDF</title>
<h2>Pre-Press and Service Bureau Considerations with Scribus PDF</h2>
<p>For service bureaus, printers, magazine publishers and other pre-press providers who are unfamiliar with Scribus, the following notes in the linked PDF are meant to address your concerns: <a href="<?php echo $site_pdfs_root?>pre-press.pdf">Pre-Press and Scribus</a> (202 kb).</p>
<p>This is currently an updated working draft, but it has much relevant information on Scribus created PDFs. This will updated with more information and test results as we have more information on hand.</p>
<p>For service bureaus, printers, magazine publishers and other pre-press providers who are unfamiliar with Scribus, the notes available in the Pre-Press and Scribus PDF from http://docs.scribus.net are meant to address your concerns.</p>
<p>This is currently an updated working draft, but it has much relevant information on Scribus created PDFs. This will updated with more information and test results as we have more information on hand.</p>
</qt>
/trunk/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/Makefile.am
1,6 → 1,6
SUBDIRS = tutorials
SUBDIRS = tutorials images
 
EXTRA_DIST = about1.html about2.html acroreader.html cms.html codingstandards.html contributions.html corelphoto.html cross-platform.html cups.html cygwin.html developers.html docchanges.html doccopyright.html docinfo.html download.html faq1.html faq2.html faq3.html fonts1.html fonts2.html fonts3.html gettexthowto.html gsadv.html gsview.html hyphenator.html importhints2.html importhints.html index.html install1.html install2.html install3.html install4.html install.html install-dpkg.html intro.html javascriptpdf.html keys.html machints1.html machints2.html menu.xml moncal.html parallel-install.html pdfexport1.html pdfexport2.html pdfexport3.html pdfexport4.html pdfx3.html plugin_howto.html prepress.html print1.html print2.html print3.html resources.html screenshots.html scribuscopyright.html scribusfileformat.html scribus-svg.html scripter1.html scripterapi-color.html scripterapi-constants.html scripterapi-dialogs.html scripterapi-doc.html scripterapi-font.html scripterapi-getobjprop.html scripterapi.html scripterapi-layer.html scripterapi-manobj.html scripterapi-object.html scripterapi-page.html scripterapi-select.html scripterapi-setobjprop.html scripterapi-textframes.html settings1.html specs.html toolbox10.html toolbox11.html toolbox12.html toolbox13.html toolbox1.html toolbox2.html toolbox3.html toolbox4.html toolbox5.html toolbox6.html toolbox7.html toolbox8.html toolbox9.html toolbox.html topten.html translation_howto.html wine.html
EXTRA_DIST = about1.html about2.html acroreader.html cms.html codingstandards.html contributions.html cross-platform.html cups.html cygwin.html developers.html docchanges.html doccopyright.html docinfo.html download.html faq1.html faq2.html faq3.html fonts1.html fonts2.html fonts3.html gettexthowto.html gsadv.html gsview.html hyphenator.html importhints2.html importhints.html index.html install1.html install2.html install3.html install4.html install.html install-dpkg.html intro.html javascriptpdf.html keys.html machints1.html machints2.html menu.xml moncal.html parallel-install.html pdfexport1.html pdfexport2.html pdfexport3.html pdfexport4.html pdfx3.html plugin_howto.html prepress.html print1.html print2.html print3.html resources.html screenshots.html scribuscopyright.html scribusfileformat.html scribus-svg.html scripter1.html scripterapi-color.html scripterapi-constants.html scripterapi-dialogs.html scripterapi-doc.html scripterapi-font.html scripterapi-getobjprop.html scripterapi.html scripterapi-layer.html scripterapi-manobj.html scripterapi-object.html scripterapi-page.html scripterapi-select.html scripterapi-setobjprop.html scripterapi-textframes.html settings1.html specs.html toolbox10.html toolbox11.html toolbox12.html toolbox13.html toolbox1.html toolbox2.html toolbox3.html toolbox4.html toolbox5.html toolbox6.html toolbox7.html toolbox8.html toolbox9.html toolbox.html topten.html translation_howto.html wine.html
 
install-data-local:
$(mkinstalldirs) $(prefix)/share/scribus/doc/en/
16,8 → 16,6
$(mkinstalldirs) $(prefix)/share/scribus/doc/en/
$(INSTALL_DATA) $(srcdir)/contributions.html $(prefix)/share/scribus/doc/en/contributions.html
$(mkinstalldirs) $(prefix)/share/scribus/doc/en/
$(INSTALL_DATA) $(srcdir)/corelphoto.html $(prefix)/share/scribus/doc/en/corelphoto.html
$(mkinstalldirs) $(prefix)/share/scribus/doc/en/
$(INSTALL_DATA) $(srcdir)/cross-platform.html $(prefix)/share/scribus/doc/en/cross-platform.html
$(mkinstalldirs) $(prefix)/share/scribus/doc/en/
$(INSTALL_DATA) $(srcdir)/cups.html $(prefix)/share/scribus/doc/en/cups.html
185,6 → 183,8
$(INSTALL_DATA) $(srcdir)/translation_howto.html $(prefix)/share/scribus/doc/en/translation_howto.html
$(mkinstalldirs) $(prefix)/share/scribus/doc/en/
$(INSTALL_DATA) $(srcdir)/wine.html $(prefix)/share/scribus/doc/en/wine.html
$(mkinstalldirs) $(prefix)/share/scribus/doc/en/
$(INSTALL_DATA) $(srcdir)/wine.html $(prefix)/share/scribus/doc/en/pdf_form.html
uninstall-local:
-rm -f $(prefix)/share/scribus/doc/en/about1.html
193,7 → 193,6
-rm -f $(prefix)/share/scribus/doc/en/cms.html
-rm -f $(prefix)/share/scribus/doc/en/codingstandards.html
-rm -f $(prefix)/share/scribus/doc/en/contributions.html
-rm -f $(prefix)/share/scribus/doc/en/corelphoto.html
-rm -f $(prefix)/share/scribus/doc/en/cross-platform.html
-rm -f $(prefix)/share/scribus/doc/en/cups.html
-rm -f $(prefix)/share/scribus/doc/en/cygwin.html
277,3 → 276,5
-rm -f $(prefix)/share/scribus/doc/en/topten.html
-rm -f $(prefix)/share/scribus/doc/en/translation_howto.html
-rm -f $(prefix)/share/scribus/doc/en/wine.html
-rm -f $(prefix)/share/scribus/doc/en/pdf_form.html
 
/trunk/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/scribus-svg.html
1,3 → 1,5
<qt>
<title>Scribus SVG Import/Export</title>
<h2>Scribus SVG Import/Export</h2>
<p>Scribus 1.2 includes SVG import/export plug-ins, which enables you to export Scribus pages or objects as SVG. The import plug-in allows you to import SVG drawings and documents from illustration programs like Inkscape, Skencil and Adobe Illustrator.</p>
<p>These plug-ins have the capability to import and export SVG 1.0 standards 2D graphics primitives and text, which can then be displayed in web browsers with SVG capability, within SVG viewers or further edited with SVG capable vector editors, like Skencil, Inkscape or Adobe Illustrator.
47,4 → 49,5
<h4>Where can I learn more?</h4>
<p><a href="http://www.svgx.org/">SVG Foundation</a> has a wealth of links and news.</p><p>Other links are listed in the <a href="sclinks.html">Links page</a></p>
<h4>A Scribus page displayed in a browser:</strong></h4>
<div style="text-align: center"><img src="<?php echo $scr_shots_root; ?>svg1.png" title="Scribus Page Exported as SVG in Browser" alt="Scribus Page Exported as SVG in Browser" /></div>
<table width="100%"><tr><td align="center"><img src="images/svg1.png" title="Scribus Page Exported as SVG in Browser" alt="Scribus Page Exported as SVG in Browser" /></td></tr></table>
</qt>
/trunk/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/codingstandards.html
1,3 → 1,5
<qt>
<title>Scribus Coding Standards</title>
<h2>Scribus Coding Standards</h2>
 
<p>Initial document: Paul F. Johnson, Feb 26th 2004, Version: 0.04</p>
275,4 → 277,5
 
<p>Please use the current functions and refer to the <a href="plugin_howto.html">Plugin howto</a> for further information.</p>
<p>All code has to be encompassed within an <code>extern "C" { ... };</code> to enable the plugin to work.
Ensure that all the code is documented and follows the coding guidelines set out above.</p>
Ensure that all the code is documented and follows the coding guidelines set out above.</p>
</qt>
/trunk/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/acroreader.html
1,3 → 1,5
<qt>
<title>Using &#034;Hidden&#034; Features with Acrobat Reader and Scribus</title>
<h2>Using &#034;Hidden&#034; Features with Acrobat Reader and Scribus</h2>
 
<p>Acrobat Reader&#174; is in my experience, one of the essential tools to have when using Scribus. Although mostly a simple viewer, it has some advanced features which no other PDF viewer has in the Linux,*nix world: full support for JavaScript with a PDF (You did not know a PDF was scriptable? Scribus is unique in the Linux/*nix world for the ability to create scriptable interactive PDF forms.) and detailed info which is embedded in the PDF, but viewable only in Acro Reader. Moreover, while PDF is a published standard, Adobe invented postscript on which PDF is based and has a commercial incentive to promote PDF on all platforms.</p>
15,13 → 17,13
 
<p>First, make sure you have the latest version 5.0.8 for Linux. This version is <em>vastly</em> better than 4.0.5, even with above mentioned bugs - more stable, faster loading, better printing, and more accurate color. If you are running Redhat 8.0+, the easiest way to install Acro Reader is to get the RPMS from <a href="http://www.gurulabs.com/downloads.html">Guru Labs</a>. The place to get Acrobat Reader, if your distro does not offer an rpm, deb or other package is from <a href="http://www.adobe.com/products/acrobat/alternate.html">Adobe</a>.</p>
<p>Next, once you get it installed and working, open Acrobat Reader, click through the usual license stuff and select: <strong>Edit &#062; Preferences &#062; General</strong> and you will have a dialog like the one below:</p>
<div style="text-align: center"><img src="<?php echo $scr_shots_root; ?>acro1.png" alt="Acrobat Reader General Preferences" /></div>
<table width="100%"><tr><td align="center"><img src="images/acro1.png" alt="Acrobat Reader General Preferences" /></td></tr></table>
 
<p>This dialog is <strong>very</strong> important to set up properly for optimized viewing Scribus created PDFs. <strong>Display Edge to Edge</strong> will give you a larger viewing area to view your PDF. <strong>Smooth Text, Smooth Line Art and Smooth Images</strong> applies a bit of anti-aliasing when viewing. If you send someone a Scribus created PDF and they complain the text or gradients) look like barbed wire or are &#034;banded&#034;, advise the user to enable these settings which are common on all later versions of Acrobat Reader - regardless of platform. There are other cross- platform fonts hints in the <a href="pdfexport.html">PDF Export Options</a> section. <strong>Cool Type</strong> is a feature specific for making PDF readable on LCD laptop screens. It is a way of adjusting the anti-aliasing and sub-pixel rendering. Otherwise, leave it unchecked.</p>
 
<p>If you are creating Scribus files with transparency effects and export PDF 1.4 (PDF 1.3 does not support transparency), you can enable <strong>Show Transparency Grid</strong>. The other options are mostly for the web browser plug-in. I find splash screens a bother, so I leave that unchecked.</p>
 
<div style="text-align: center"><img src="<?php echo $scr_shots_root; ?>acro3.png" alt="Acrobat Reader Screen shot" title="Acrobat Reader Screenshot" /></div>
<table width="100%"><tr><td align="center"><img src="images/acro3.png" alt="Acrobat Reader Screen shot" title="Acrobat Reader Screenshot" /></td></tr></table>
<p>Next, looking at the Reader window above, there are 3 features which can be useful:</p>
<ol>
<li><strong>Thumbnails (which Scribus can optionally embed in the PDF when exporting) are useful for navigating.</strong></li>
28,13 → 30,13
<li><strong>The corner triangle</strong> is a short cut to <strong>View &#062; Document Info, Document Fonts, Document Security</strong>.</li>
<li><strong>Is notes, which are non-printing, but can be used to give definitions or hints in a document</strong>. What we care about is document info. Within Scribus <strong>File &#062; Document Info</strong> there is a panel to enter author and Title of the document. This shows up in a panel below:</li>
</ol>
<div style="text-align: center"><img alt="Acrobat Reader General Info Panel" src="<?php echo $scr_shots_root; ?>acroinfo.png" /></div>
<table width="100%"><tr><td align="center"><img alt="Acrobat Reader General Info Panel" src="images/acroinfo.png" /></td></tr></table>
<p>This shows the document size, date of creation and creating application. This info is automatically embedded. Scribus can optionally add author and document title. In addition, this shows document security strength.</p>
<p><strong>Document Security</strong>. Scribus has the ability to encrypt a document with specific user rights. If you enable Security in the PDF export dialog, when you export PDF 1.3, encryption is 40 bit strength.</p>
<div style="text-align: center"><img src="<?php echo $scr_shots_root; ?>acropass.png" alt="Password Dialog for Opening a Protected PDF" title="Password Dialog for Opening a Protected PDF" /></div>
<table width="100%"><tr><td align="center"><img src="images/acropass.png" alt="Password Dialog for Opening a Protected PDF" title="Password Dialog for Opening a Protected PDF" /></td></tr></table>
 
<p> If you export a PDF 1.4 file, encryption is 128 bit strength:</p>
<div style="text-align: center"><img alt="Acrobat Reader Security Panel" src="<?php echo $scr_shots_root; ?>acrosec.png" /></div>
<table width="100%"><tr><td align="center"><img alt="Acrobat Reader Security Panel" src="images/acrosec.png" /></td></tr></table>
<p><strong>Annotations</strong> are non-printing notes, which Scribus can optionally embed within a PDF. This is really simple. Create a text frame. Then add your notes and right click and check &#034;is PDF annotation&#034;.</p>
<p>For other &#034;hidden&#034; features, read through the on line help, which is actually a PDF. Beginning with page 10, there are a number of less well known features, including the console command line options. The command line options are specific to Linux/Unix and include some neat options to export PDF into Postscript. There also hints on settings specific to Acrobat Reader in <code>~/Xdefaults</code>.</p>
<p><strong>Advanced Settings</strong> - Unfortunately, Adobe did not enable a graphical UI choice for enabling/disabling local fonts. What this means Acrobat will use locally installed fonts which are named in the PDF, if it can find them in your font path. In your home directory is a <strong>.acrobat/prefs</strong> file. Make a backup copy then open this file in a text editor. Almost at the end you are looking for this line:</p>
48,4 → 50,5
<h3>Other PDF Viewers:</h3>
<p>Another useful PDF viewer to use with Scribus is <a href="http://www.cs.wisc.edu/~ghost/gsview/">GSView</a> which is a graphical viewer/front end to Ghostscript. The latest version (4.6) with Ghostscript 7.07+ work very nicely together allow you to convert PS to PDF, as well as view and convert EPS, PS and PDF files among other tools. Version 4.3 is the first version to really work well under Linux (it was originally developed on Windows). More details are in <a href="gsview.html">GSView and Scribus</a>.</p>
<p><strong>Xpdf</strong> 3.00+ versions of Xpdf from <a href="http://foolabs.com">Foolabs</a> will do a fine job of displaying and printing Scribus PDFs, including support for PDF 1.5. Xpdf also has command line tools for converting PDFs to PS. To get embedded fonts in all PDFs, not just Scribus, you should read the Xpdf man page about setting up the fonts paths correctly via the xpdfrc file. Otherwise, embedded fonts may nto display properly.</p>
<p>For a taste of <em>some</em> of the cool PDF tricks Scribus can do, make sure you read through the sample docs located in the samples subdirectory of where the Scribus files are located. Maximize Acrobat Reader, open the file and follow the instructions. Consider it the first &#034;Easter Egg&#034; in Scribus.;)</p>
<p>For a taste of <em>some</em> of the cool PDF tricks Scribus can do, make sure you read through the sample docs located in the samples subdirectory of where the Scribus files are located. Maximize Acrobat Reader, open the file and follow the instructions. Consider it the first &#034;Easter Egg&#034; in Scribus.;)</p>
</qt>
/trunk/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/index.html
1,13 → 1,13
<h2>Open Source Desktop Publishing for Linux</h2>
<qt>
<title>Open Source Desktop Publishing for Linux</title>
<table border="0" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" width="100%" bgcolor="#2780b9" >
<tr>
<td align="left"><img src="images/docheader1.png" width="222" height="87"></td>
<td align="right"><img src="images/docheader2.png" width="318" height="87"></td>
</tr>
</table>
<h2><u>Open Source Desktop Publishing for Linux</u></h2>
 
<?php
 
protoGallery( $site_root . $scr_slideshow_root . 'gallery',
'THUMBNAILS = 1',
'random');
 
?>
 
<p>Scribus brings award-winning professional DTP to Linux and *nix desktops with a combination of &#034;press-ready&#034; output and new approaches to page layout.</p>
 
<p>Since its humble beginning in the spring of 2001, Scribus has rapidly developed into one of the premier desktop applications for Linux. Called by Newsforge, <b>"..one of the killer applications for Linux"</b>, Scribus 1.2 brings new power and versatile tools for desktop publishing. New features like separation previews, cross-platform python scripting, advanced PDF 1.4 support are just some of the hundreds of improvements large and small in Scribus 1.2.</p>
14,7 → 14,7
 
<p>Underneath the modern and user friendly interface, Scribus supports professional publishing features, such as CMYK color, separations, ICC color management and versatile PDF creation. <b>Scribus was the first DTP application on the planet to directly support PDF/X-3 output, a rigorous ISO standard.</b> Scribus did so by almost a year. Other features include PDF Import, EPS import/export, Unicode text including right to left scripts such as Arabic and Hebrew.</p>
 
<p><b>Scribus also has unexpected touches such as: useful vector drawing tools, SVG import/export and support for Open Type Fonts.</b> The Scribus file format is XML based; open and completely documented. Unlike proprietary binary file formats, even damaged documents, can be recovered with a simple text editor - sometimes a challenging problem with other page layout programs. There is an easy to use drag and drop scrapbook. Scribus has been translated into more than 24 languages and more are coming in the future. <b>The Scribus team prides itself on excellent end user support with a lively IRC channel and friendly mailing list.</b></p>
<p><b>Scribus also has unexpected touches such as: useful vector drawing tools, SVG import/export and support for Open Type Fonts.</b> The Scribus file format is XML based; open and completely documented. Unlike proprietary binary file formats, even damaged documents can be recovered with a simple text editor - sometimes a challenging problem with other page layout programs. There is an easy to use drag and drop scrapbook. Scribus has been translated into more than 25 languages and more are coming in the future. <b>The Scribus team prides itself on excellent end user support with a lively IRC channel and friendly mailing list.</b></p>
 
 
<div class="news">
23,5 → 23,4
<p><b>28/08/2004</b> - Scribus 1.2 released</p>
</div>
</div>
 
 
</qt>
/trunk/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/toolbox2.html
1,4 → 1,7
<qt>
<title>Other PDF Viewers</title>
<h2>Other PDF Viewers</h2>
<p>Another useful PDF viewer to use with Scribus is GSview which is a graphical viewer/front end to Ghostscript. The latest version (4.6) with Ghostscript 7.07+ work very nicely together allow you to convert PS to PDF, as well as view and convert EPS, PS and PDF files among other tools. Version 4.3 is the first version to really work well under Linux (it was originally developed on another operating system). More details are in GSview and Scribus.</p>
<p><strong>Xpdf</strong> 3.00 or greater versions of Xpdf from Foolabs will do a fine job of displaying and printing Scribus PDFs, including support for PDF 1.5. Xpdf also has command line tools for converting PDFs to PS. To get embedded fonts in all PDFs, not just Scribus, you should read the Xpdf man page about setting up the fonts paths correctly via the xpdfrc file. Otherwise, embedded fonts may not display properly. One known limitation is the inability to display transparency in Scribus generated PDFs.</p>
<p>For a taste of some of the cool PDF tricks Scribus can do, make sure you read through the sample docs located in the samples subdirectory of where the Scribus files are located. Maximize Acrobat Reader, open the file and follow the instructions. Consider it the first "Easter Egg" in Scribus.;)</p>
<p>For a taste of some of the cool PDF tricks Scribus can do, make sure you read through the sample docs located in the samples subdirectory of where the Scribus files are located. Maximize Acrobat Reader, open the file and follow the instructions. Consider it the first "Easter Egg" in Scribus.;)</p>
</qt>
/trunk/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/moncal.html
1,3 → 1,5
<qt>
<title>A Quick Start Guide to Monitor Profiling with littlecms</title>
<h2>A Quick Start Guide to Monitor Profiling with littlecms</h2>
 
<h4>Overview</h4>
33,18 → 35,18
 
<p>Next, set monitor contrast to nearly 100%. Then you want to use the brightness controls to adjust the brightness, so you can see the following, so that each of the shades of gray is distinct.</p>
 
<div style="text-align: center"><img src="<?php echo $scr_shots_root; ?>gammagrayscale.png" title="Adjust brightness so all shades of gray are visible." alt="gamma gray scale gradient" /></div>
<table width="100%"><tr><td align="center"><img src="images/gammagrayscale.png" title="Adjust brightness so all shades of gray are visible." alt="gamma gray scale gradient" /></td></tr></table>
 
<h4>Using qtmonitorprofiler</h4>
 
<p>The first tab will bring up the panel. Check: "I want build a coarse monitor profile."</p>
 
<div style="text-align: center;"><img src="<?php echo $scr_shots_root; ?>monprof1.png" title="The first qtmeasurement panel" alt="The first qtmeasurement panel"></div>
<table width="100%"><tr><td align="center"> src="images/monprof1.png" title="The first qtmeasurement panel" alt="The first qtmeasurement panel"></td></tr></table>
 
<p>Then switch to one the below:</p>
 
<div style="text-align: center;"><img src="<?php echo $scr_shots_root; ?>monprof2.png" title="Setting gamma and monitor white space with qtmonitorprofiler." alt="Setting gamma and monitor white space with qtmonitorprofiler.">
</div>
<table width="100%"><tr><td align="center"> src="images/monprof2.png" title="Setting gamma and monitor white space with qtmonitorprofiler." alt="Setting gamma and monitor white space with qtmonitorprofiler.">
</td></tr></table>
 
<p>Now that we have switched the monitor temperature to 6500K, set the same in the white point drop down list. Then, unless you know there is a specific reason to over ride the default sRGB, leave this as is. You do not need to name the profile as indicated just yet.</p>
 
52,7 → 54,7
 
<p>Next go to the <strong>Profile Identification</strong> tab. Add some additional info as shown below:</p>
 
<div style="text-align: center;"><img src="<?php echo $scr_shots_root; ?>monprof4.png" title="adding descriptive info for your icm profile" alt="adding descriptive info for your icm profile"></div>
<table width="100%"><tr><td align="center"> src="images/monprof4.png" title="adding descriptive info for your icm profile" alt="adding descriptive info for your icm profile"></td></tr></table>
 
<h4>Using the monitor profile in Scribus</h4>
 
67,10 → 69,11
 
<p>Now Scribus can use this profile for more accurately managing screen previews. Start or restart Scribus and go <strong>Settings &gt; Color Management</strong>. Enable color management and select the monitor profile as below:</p>
 
<div style="text-align: center;"><img src="<?php echo $scr_shots_root; ?>scribuscms1.png" title="Scribus CMS settings for the monitor profile" alt="Scribus CMS settings for the monitor profile"></div>
<table width="100%"><tr><td align="center"> src="images/scribuscms1.png" title="Scribus CMS settings for the monitor profile" alt="Scribus CMS settings for the monitor profile"></td></tr></table>
 
<p>By setting this monitor profile to be the default, you have enhanced the accuracy of your screen previews. You can selectively enable the gamut checking in your previews, but this is not quite perfected in littlecms. This is not a weakness is littlecms nor Scribus, but a limitation of the current icc specs. When enabling this consider the preview a warning - not definitive. The true test is what actually will print.</p>
 
<p>You can also use this profile to enhance the previews in Corel Photopaint or other image editing programs like Photoshop which are color management savvy. Monitor colors and brightness vary over time, so re-profiling at least once every couple of months is a good idea. In professional settings, sometimes they are re-profiled every week</p>
 
<p><strong>Note 30:10:2003:</strong> The latest beta profiler for littlecms adds new features, including support for profiling digital cameras and additional enhancements. However, it is a Windows only program. Fortunately, it includes the updated lcms 1.11 and it installs and runs fine under any recent version of Wine.</p>
<p><strong>Note 30:10:2003:</strong> The latest beta profiler for littlecms adds new features, including support for profiling digital cameras and additional enhancements. However, it is a Windows only program. Fortunately, it includes the updated lcms 1.11 and it installs and runs fine under any recent version of Wine.</p>
</qt>
/trunk/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/topten.html
1,4 → 1,6
<h2>Top Ten Hints - Tips and Tricks to make better documents faster in Scribus.</h2>
<qt>
<title>Top Ten Hints - Tips and Tricks to make better documents faster in Scribus</title>
<h2>Top Ten Hints - Tips and Tricks to make better documents faster in Scribus</h2>
 
<p>These are our top ten hints for using Scribus, in (some sort of) order:</p>
 
13,8 → 15,9
<li><strong>Page Templates</strong> can be big time saver. Anytime you have common elements on several pages, add those elements to a template. This also avoids accidently moving or deleting objects.</li>
<li><strong>Backup your Preferences</strong> - This is more important for users of CVS versions of Scribus. Occasionally - <strong>much less</strong> common now, a program crash caused by a bad image etc., can corrupt your preferences. So, to get a good replacement setup, close Scribus and rename the hidden <code>.scribus</code> folder in your home directory to <code>.scribusbak</code>. Reopen Scribus with no document open and change every setting as you wish and then close Scribus. Now copy the whole directory somewhere else. Then, if you have weird behavior in Scribus, the first thing to do is copy the good <code>.scribus</code> directory over the current one and restart. This is also important if, you have lots of custom keyboard shortcuts.</li>
<li><strong>A cool trick</strong> for precision adjustments. This may or may not work on your workstation, depending on how your wheel mouse is configured. You can use the mouse wheel with the spin boxes instead of clicking the arrows. For small steps, put the cursor to the far right, as shown below. Then spin the mouse wheel up and down to adjust the measurement or setting. This adjusts 10ths of a unit. For larger adjustments, put the cursor to the left side. For extra slow and precise adjustments 100th of a unit, Hold Crtl - Shift keys while moving the wheel mouse up and down. Since I discovered this by accident.<br />
<div style="text-align: center"><img src="<?php echo $scr_shots_root; ?>spinbox1.png" width="171" height="354" title="Place the cursor as indicated by the arrow" alt="Place the cursor as indicated by the arrow" /></div><br />
<table width="100%"><tr><td align="center"><img src="images/spinbox1.png" width="171" height="354" title="Place the cursor as indicated by the arrow" alt="Place the cursor as indicated by the arrow" /></td></tr></table><br />
</li>
<li><strong>Bonus</strong> - subscribe to the Scribus mailing list. You can get this in digest form daily. The list is active, polite and newbies and experts alike are welcome. Do not be shy to ask questions, Linux gurus might be new to DTP and vice versa. <a href="http://nashi.altmuehlnet.de/mailman/listinfo/scribus">Scribus Mailing List Info</a> If you have tips you would like to share post them to the list. We will ensure they are considered and credited properly.</li>
<li><strong>Extra Bonus</strong> - How to ask questions and file bug reports/issues on mailing list? First, in newer versions go to <strong>Help > About </strong> and include the build info. <a href="menuhelp.html">More details</a> Then, look in the <a href="http://nashi.altmuehlnet.de/pipermail/scribus/">mailing list archives</a> or on the <a href="http://bugs.scribus.net">Bug Tracker</a>, you might find you answer there. Then, make sure you add relevant details like which distribution, version of Scribus, versions of relevant packages or libraries. e.g. version of XFree86 if you have video or font issues. This helps the developers and other knowledgable users to respond quicker and more accurately. <strong>Note:</strong> If you are using a CVS version of Scribus, please also include the build date.</li>
</ol>
</ol>
</qt>
/trunk/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/cups.html
1,8 → 1,10
<qt>
<title>Driving CUPS and Gimp-Print with Scribus</title>
<h2>Driving CUPS and Gimp-Print with Scribus</h2>
<p>CUPS, GIMP Print and Scribus make a great combination. With Scribus 1.2, you can &#034;drive&#034; CUPS directly from Scribus.</p>
<p>First, make sure you have the the correct CUPS development libraries installed before compiling Scribus. On Redhat, for example, they are named cups-devel.</p>
<p>The cups control panel in Scribus with the regular ijs plus ghostscript driver:</p>
<div style="text-align: center"><img align="center" alt="Cups Control Panel in Scribus" src="<?php echo $scr_shots_root; ?>cups1.png" /></div>
<table width="100%"><tr><td align="center"><img align="center" alt="Cups Control Panel in Scribus" src="images/cups1.png" /></td></tr></table>
<h3>Hints:</h3>
<ul>
<li>CUPS has a separate gimp-print plug in which really improves the output of Scribus and any color docs GIMP-Print Drivers</li>
10,6 → 12,7
<li>CUPS also has an <strong>escputil</strong> command line utility for cleaning the heads etc. Simply type: <strong>escputil -help</strong> for options. This is for Epson printers only.</li>
</ul>
<p>Image below shows the difference in having the GIMP-Print Plug-in.</p>
<div style="text-align: center"><img align="center" alt="Cups Control Panel in Scribus With Gimp-Print" src="<?php echo $scr_shots_root; ?>cups2.png" /></div>
<table width="100%"><tr><td align="center"><img align="center" alt="Cups Control Panel in Scribus With Gimp-Print" src="images/cups2.png" /></td></tr></table>
<p>The main difference is the more refined color adjustments and color space adjustments available in GIMP Print. It is slower than other drivers, but the output quality is the main reason. You can also use kprinter in combination with other programs which are not CUPS aware, but can benefit from high quality printing. As an example, Acrobat Reader on Linux does not recognize CUPS, but has a command line window to call kprinter. Thus, you can print high resolution PDF's with the same high quality as Scribus.</p>
<p>What I recommend with CUPS is to set up your everyday printer with the ijs or regular kprinter driver and then add a second printer instance with GIMP Print, so you have quicker output with everyday docs like text files etc..</p>
<p>What I recommend with CUPS is to set up your everyday printer with the ijs or regular kprinter driver and then add a second printer instance with GIMP Print, so you have quicker output with everyday docs like text files etc..</p>
</qt>