Subversion Repositories Scribus

Compare Revisions

Ignore whitespace Rev 2578 → Rev 2579

/trunk/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/pdfx3.html
4,6 → 4,7
<p>Support for PDF/X-3 is a major milestone in the development of Scribus. Scribus was the first DTP application to support a demanding, but open ISO standard: ISO 15930-3:2002. This type of support for high quality PDF creation has been, until now, available only in expensive proprietary applications. Moreover, creating &#034;press ready&#034; Creating commercial press ready PDFs has historically been fraught with errors, especially for users unfamiliar with the nuances of postscript, PDF distilling and varying capabilities of image-setters. The saying &#034;It is hard to create a good PDF, but really easy to mess up&#034;, has a great deal of truth. The more common usage of the Adobe Acrobat Distiller family of applications for PDF creation has typically needed knowledge of at least some of the close to 100 Distiller parameters.</p>
<p>In European countries the concept of PDF/X has been more widely accepted than in North America. Much of the push for these standards has come primarily from Germany and German pre-press companies, a worldwide leader in press and high end digital imaging technology.</p>
<p>The creation of PDF/X, currently with 3 defined ISO standards, is in part, an attempt to provide end users and creators with a vendor neutral measuring stick to vet files as suitable for professional printing or exchange with service bureaus. Scribus now has easy to understand and use options which enable end users to create 100% PDF/X-3 compliant files. By judicious use of PDF options, end users can be assured their files, if they require, too be 100% standards compliant. As always, be certain any PDFs you create can be used in the work-flow of your printer or pre-press service bureau. Not all are equipped to handle the latest in PDF technology. The latest Prinergy and Harlequin image-setting work-flows are capable of supporting PDF/X-3</p>
<p><strong>Warning: all images should be in RGB, not CMYK before importing. Otherwise, unwanted color shifts may appear.</strong></p>
<h3>Quick Start to Creating a PDF/X-3 Compatible PDF</h3>
<ol>
<li>Make sure color management is installed and working properly. You need at least one CMYK ICC printer profile installed.</li>
/trunk/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/pdfexport1.html
12,8 → 12,8
<p>One of the challenges with PDF and EPS viewers on Linux, is that Scribus creates high end PS level 3 and PDF 1.4, with capabilities beyond most of the open source viewers. Some of these features are only supported in commercial pre-press or DTP tools. Two plus years of working with Scribus has led me to the current conclusion that the following three viewers are the most reliable at displaying PS/EPS/PDF created by Scribus:</p>
<ul>
<li><strong>Adobe Reader 5.0.8+ for Linux</strong> - The best and sometimes the only choice for PDF viewing. Detailed notes and hints: <a href="toolbox1.html">Adobe Reader</a>.</li>
<li><strong>GSview 4.6+</strong> - with the latest version of Ghostscript available. This combination is your best choice for viewing EPS files, PS files and most PDFs. In addition, GSview has many other very useful capabilities with add-ons like <code>pstoedit</code> and <code>epstool</code>. For more detailed notes and hints: <a href="toolbox6.html">GSview</a>. I consider it an essential tool for DTP on Linux.</li>
<li><strong>Xpdf 3.00+</strong> - This updated PDF viewer has a new rendering engine and is capable of viewing PDF 1.5 files.</li>
<li><strong>GSview 4.7+</strong> - with the latest version of Ghostscript available. This combination is your best choice for viewing EPS files, PS files and most PDFs. In addition, GSview has many other very useful capabilities with add-ons like <code>pstoedit</code> and <code>epstool</code>. For more detailed notes and hints: <a href="toolbox6.html">GSview</a>. I consider it an essential tool for DTP on Linux.</li>
<li><strong>Kpdf 3.4+</strong> - This updated PDF viewer from KDE 3.4has a new rendering engine and is capable of viewing PDF 1.5 files.</li>
</ul>
<p><strong>If any other PDF or EPS viewer you choose cannot display PDFs from Scribus, but they do view properly in Acrobat Reader, file a bug with the upstream author. In virtually all cases I have tested, it is a limitation of the viewing application. Scribus PDFs are tested daily with specialist pre-press software to validate their adherence to the published PDF specifications.</strong></p>
</qt>
/trunk/Scribus/scribus/doc/en/pdfexport2.html
12,7 → 12,7
<p><strong>Presentation Effects</strong> - the recommended settings are down-sample all images to 72, 96 or 120 dpi, depending on the resolution of the display screen. Embed all fonts and landscape page layouts will give you maximum image area on the screen if you plan on using a display projector. More hints on Presentation PDFs further on.</p>
</li>
<li>
<p><strong>Press Optimized</strong> - Clear all down-sampling or compression of images where image quality is of utmost importance. All images brought into to Scribus as placed images should be a minimum of 200 dpi and preferably 300 dpi or more for photos or TIFFs. Line art or vector graphics converted to an EPS in a program like Illustrator should have a minimum of 800 dpi for best results. <strong>This is the recommended method if you are creating PDF/X-3 compliant PDFs</strong>.</p>
<p><strong>Press Optimized</strong> - Clear all down-sampling or compression of images where image quality is of utmost importance. All images brought into to Scribus as placed images should be a minimum of 200 dpi and preferably 300 dpi or more for photos or TIFFs. Line art or vector graphics converted to an EPS in a program like Illustrator should have a minimum of 800 dpi for best results. Most vector EPS can be imported directly as native Scribus objects and recommended where possible. <strong>If your printer supports color managed PDF/X-3, This is the recommended method for optimal results. However, only the latest printing technology can support it and you should only enable this when your printer advises. </strong>.</p>
</li>
<li>
<p><strong>Print Optimized</strong> - This would mean targeting the PDF for printing on an office laser jet or ink jet. Recommended settings: down-sample all images to 300 dpi or less, embed fonts and keep your page margins with enough tolerance for margin limits on desktop and common office laser printers (approx. 6/10th of an inch or 15cm.)</p>