Subversion Repositories Scribus

Compare Revisions

Ignore whitespace Rev 15136 → Rev 15137

/trunk/Scribus/doc/en/WwLines.html
0,0 → 1,88
<html>
<head>
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8"/>
<title>Working with Lines & Line Styles</title>
</head>
<body>
<h2>Working with Lines & Line Styles</h2>
<h3>Properties: Lines</h3>
<table width="75%" cellpadding="5">
<tr><td><img src="images/line_tab7.png"></td>
<td valign="top">Here in the Line tab of the Properties palette is where we set the line attributes of the various kinds of lines used in Scribus, which includes:
<ul>
<li>Straight lines (single line segments)</li>
<li>Bezier curves</li>
<li>Freehand lines</li>
<li>Borders of Shapes and Polygons</li>
<li>Borders of frames of all kinds &ndash; <i>these must have a color assigned for these settings to show.</i></li>
</ul>
We are going to describe these Line tab items a bit out of order, since it seems to make more sense this way for demonstration purposes.
<p>The bottom of our graphic here looks different from the default appearance, since in addition to the default <b>No Style</b>, we have created some <b>Line Styles</b> that we can use repeatedly in our document. This will be covered at the end of this section.
</td>
</tr>
</table>
<h3>Edges and Endings</h3>
<table>
<tr><td><img src="images/line_tab.png"></td>
<td>This screenshot shows the choices for corners (<b>Edges</b>) and <b>Endings</b> of lines.
<p>From left to right:
<ul>
<li><b>Miter Join</b> and <b>Flat Cap</b></li>
<li><b>Bevel Join</b> and <b>Square Cap</b></li>
<li><b>Round Join</b> and <b>Round Cap</b></li>
</ul>
<p>Since each of these is an independent choice, you will have 9 possible combinations.</td>
</tr></table>
<h3>Type of Line and Line Width</h3>
<table width="75%">
<tr>
<td valign="top">Here we see only a part of the extensive drop-down list for <b>Type of Line</b> choices.
<p>In addition to a wide array of predetermined choices, at the bottom of the list is a choice, <b>Custom</b>, which brings up the dialog you see below.</td>
<td><img src="images/line_tab2.png"></td></tr>
<tr><td>You can either manually move the sliders or use the spinboxes to make adjustments. If you have used <i>Gradients</i> in the Color tab, this slider should be familiar. Like gradients, not only can you adjust the transition points use see here, you can also add more by clicking the space underneath the slider &ndash; you will see a <b>+</b> appear next to the mouse cursor. The red triangle indicates the point for which the spinboxes apply. Remove points by click-dragging them off the slider (but you cannot have less than two).
<p>As you can see, these spinboxes have no units, since they are relative to the width of the line. The <b>Offset</b> shifts your pattern along the line and thus helps to prevent a space from occurring at the beginning or at some transition point such as a corner.
</td>
<td><img src="images/line_tab3.png"></td></tr>
<tr><td><img src="images/line_tab1.png"></td>
<td>The <b>Line Width</b> setting should need no explanation, but here to the left we see the effects of changing linewidth on the length and spacing of the same dash pattern, using linewidth settings of Hairline, 1.0 pts, and 2.0 pts respectively.
<p>The Edge and Endings settings here are the same for each line as was used above, so as you can see especially with round joins and caps, these also apply to our dashes.
</td>
</tr>
</table>
<h3>Start Arrow & End Arrow</h3>
<table width="65%" cellpadding="5">
<tr>
<td><img src="images/line_tab5.png"></td>
<td valign="bottom">Just as with <i>Type of Line</i>, we see in <b>Start Arrow</b> and <b>End Arrow</b> a quite extensive list of choices which you can discover on your own. Since these terms apply to opposite ends of a line, they can only be used with a line or an open figure, and therefore these buttons will be inactive with shapes, polygons, and frame borders.
<p>Below we see what began as a shape but then was edited to break up the triangle, so that the arrows could be applied &ndash; obviously, some "arrows" aren't arrows at all.</td>
</tr>
<tr><td></td><td><img src="images/line_tab4.png"></td>
</tr>
</table>
<h3>Basepoint</h3>
We've left this setting for last since it's a bit tricky. For any sort of line or figure, the initial settings in the X,Y,Z tab of Properties show the <b>X-Pos</b> and <b>Y-Pos</b> of the basepoint, which at first is the upper left corner of the frame or bounding box. In the case of a straight line, <b>X-Pos</b> and <b>Y-Pos</b> refer to the initial point from which the line was drawn. The other spinboxes in X,Y,Z show <b>Width</b> and <b>Height</b> of the bounding box &ndash; except for a straight line, which is defined by <b>Width</b> (i.e., length) only, plus the direction (<b>Rotation</b>) of the line, and its thickness.
<p>This condition is true for the Line tab <b>Basepoint</b> setting of <b>Left Point</b>. If you change the Basepoint to <b>End Points</b>, the X,Y,Z tab now shows spinboxes for <b>X1</b>, <b>Y1</b>, and <b>X2</b>, <b>Y2</b>.
<p>For a straight line, this means that <b>X1</b> and <b>Y1</b> refer to the <i>starting point of the line</i>, i.e., where the beginning of the line was when it was drawn. <b>X2</b> and <b>Y2</b> refer to the coordinates of the other end of the line.
<p>The example below is for a straight line &ndash; where you can see that <b>X-Pos</b> = <b>X1</b>, and <b>Y-Pos</b> = <b>Y1</b>.
<p>For anything more complex than a straight line, the values refer to the bounding box, in which case <b>X1</b> and <b>Y1</b> refer to the basepoint as set in the X,Y,Z tab, and the <b>X2</b> and <b>Y2</b> values refer to the width and height of the bounding box, and therefore will always be positive numbers.
<table cellpadding="15">
<tr><td>Basepoint: <b>Left Point</b>
<p><img src="images/geometry.png"></td>
<td>Basepoint: <b>End Points</b>
<p><img src="images/geometry1.png"></td>
</tr>
</table>
<h3>Line Styles</h3>
<table width="75%" cellpadding="5">
<tr><td align="right"><img src="images/style_manager1.png"></td>
<td valign="top">Now that we've explained various line attributes, it makes sense to talk about line styles.
<p>In <a href="WwStyles.html">Working with Styles</a> we discuss how to make text layout styles in Scribus. Here is our <b>Style Manager</b> dialog we saw there. If we click <b>New</b>, then choose <b>Line Style</b> from the drop-down list, we then expand the dialog to show the section for creating/editing line styles.</td></tr>
<tr><td><img src="images/line_tab6.png"></td>
<td>Just underneath the <i>Properties</i> label, there are two buttons, one for adding a style (so you don't have to keep going back to push the <b>New</b> button again), and the other to delete the highlighted style.
<p>If you compare your choices here with those in the Line tab of the Properties palette, you see a more limited selection. In Line Type, there is no Custom setting. There are no arrow settings, so these will be applied later if desired.
<p>What you do have here in addition are the choices for line color and line shading (saturation) that you would have had to make in the Color tab of the Properties palette.
</td>
</tr>
</table>
</body>
</html>
Property changes:
Added: svn:executable
## -0,0 +1 ##
+*
\ No newline at end of property
Index: en/settings1.html
===================================================================
--- en/settings1.html (revision 15136)
+++ en/settings1.html (revision 15137)
@@ -1,147 +1,159 @@
<html>
<head>
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8"/>
- <title>Settings and Preferences Panels</title>
+ <title>Document Settings and Preferences</title>
</head>
<body>
-<h2>Settings and Preferences Panels</h2>
+<h2>Document Settings and Preferences</h2>
+Under the <em>File</em> heading on the menu bar, you will find two related selections, <strong>Document Setup</strong> and <strong>Preferences</strong>. Each of these produces a dialog used for changing various default settings and other behavior in Scribus. <strong>Document Setup</strong> will refer to the document being edited, and changes made for that document will be saved with the document and apply when it is reopened. If you have no document open, you cannot select this dialog.
+<p><strong>Preferences</strong> in general changes settings for any future documents. It will be available whether or not you have any documents open. The following descriptions will primarily apply to Preferences, but we will point out differences compared with Document Setup as we go.
+<table cellpadding="5">
+<tr><td width="200" valign="top"><ul>
+<li><a href="#1"><strong>General</strong></a></li>
+<li><a href="#2"><strong>Document</strong></a></li>
+<li><a href="#3"><strong>Guides</strong></a></li>
+<li><a href="#4"><strong>Typography</strong></a></li>
+<li><a href="#5"><strong>Tools</strong></a></li>
+<li><a href="#6"><strong>Hyphenation</strong></a></li>
+<li><a href="#7"><strong>Fonts</strong></a></li>
+</ul></td>
+<td width="300" valign="top"><ul>
+<li><a href="#8"><strong>Preflight Verifier</strong></a></li>
+<li><a href="#9"><strong>Color Management</strong></a></li>
+<li><a href="#10"><strong>PDF Export</strong></a></li>
+<li><a href="#11"><strong>Document Item Attributes</strong></a></li>
+<li><a href="#11"><strong>Table of Contents and Indexes</strong></a></li>
+<li><a href="#12"><strong>Keyboard Shortcuts</strong></a></li>
+<li><a href="#13"><strong>Scrapbook</strong></a></li>
+</ul></td>
+<td valign="top"><ul>
+<li><a href="#14"><strong>Display</strong></a></li>
+<li><a href="#15"><strong>External Tools</strong></a></li>
+<li><a href="#16"><strong>Miscellaneous</strong></a></li>
+<li><a href="#17"><strong>Plugins</strong></a></li>
+<li><a href="#18"><strong>Short Words</strong></a></li>
+<li><a href="#19"><strong>Scripter</strong></a></li>
+<li><a href="#20"><strong>Document Information</strong></a></li>
+</ul></td></tr>
+</table>
+<h3><a name="1"></a>General (not present in Document Setup)</h3>
+<p>You may have started up Scribus in a particular <strong>Language</strong> &ndash; here we expect to see the system default language, but you can override that setting, which will remain on future startups until you change again.
+<p>The <strong>Theme</strong> will be whatever your main system theme is when none is selected, but otherwise your choices depend on your operating system and its themes. You can also change Scribus fonts as seen here. The various other settings are straightforward, and experimentation will be your guide.
+<p>The various Paths are the default locations Scribus will use for these operations. The path for Scripts is where Scribus looks when you choose <em>Scripts > Execute Script</em> from the menu.
+<table width="90%"><tr><td align="center"><img src="images/prefs_general.png" align="center" alt="Preferences: General" title="General Preferences" width="680"/></td></tr></table>
+<h3><a name="2"></a>Document</h3>
+In Preferences, the various settings here will be those that you see when you open a new document (<em>File > New</em>). In Document Settings, they will change the current document. The <strong>Page Size</strong> section should be easily understandable, with a large selection of standard sizes to choose from, in addition to <em>Custom</em>. The <strong>Document Layout</strong> choices have been the source of confusion for some. These simply apply to the relative placement of pages on your screen, and each will have the size as indicated, not some subdivision of it. <em>Double Sided</em> would typically be chosen for a book-like layout, and thus the First Page selector at the bottom allows the initial page to be Right or Left. This helps you use the appropriate Master Page layout (covered elsewhere).
+<table width="90%"><tr><td align="center"><img src="images/prefs_document.png" align="center" alt="Default Document Settings" title="Default Document Settings" width="680" /></td><td width="275"><img src="images/prefs_document1.png" width="250"><p>Here is an example of Double Sided, Right Page as the first (also happens to be two-column). If you print these on a local printer, they will print as individual pages.</td></tr></table>
+<p><strong>Preset Layouts</strong> will be available for anything other than Single Page layout. What these represent are some time-honored ways to set the margins of the page, many based on some mathematical approach related to the dimensions of the page. Below we see the contrast of these various methods &ndash; these are all right pages of a double-sided layout.
+<p><table cellpadding="3"><tr>
+<td align="center"><img src="images/prefs_gutenberg.png"><p>Gutenberg</td><td align="center"><img src="images/prefs_magazine.png"><p>Magazine</td><td align="center"><img src="images/prefs_fibonacci.png"><p>Fibonacci</td><td align="center"><img src="images/prefs_goldenmean.png"><p>Golden Mean</td><td align="center"><img src="images/prefs_9parts.png"><p>Nine Parts</td>
+</tr></table>
+<h3><a name="3"></a>Guides</h3>
+<p>Although labeled <strong>Guides</strong>, there are many other settings here, mostly related. Guides can either show above or below your content. <strong>Snapping: Snap Distance</strong> applies when <em>Page > Snap to Guides</em> or <em>Page > Snap to Grid</em> has been selected. <strong>Grab Radius</strong> has to do with the size of the virtual space for grabbing and dragging a frame's handles. As the tooltips indicate, you must shut down and restart Scribus for these to take effect when they are changed.
+This panel sets the default distances and colors, as well as the snap to settings. <strong>Baseline Grids</strong> is the set of horizontal guides which forces text in multiple columns to align horizontally, as shown below. Settings for the distances for baselines are in Paragraph Styles, as well as the next panel <strong>Typography</strong></p>
-<p>The settings panels are the heart of changing the default behaviors of Scribus and give you considerable flexibility in setting document and program defaults. If you are new to page layout, some of these terms might not be familiar, but there is a multi-lingual glossary on <a href="http://wiki.scribus.net">http://wiki.scribus.net</a> compiled by a group of Scribus users, as well as the included documentation. </p>
+<table width="90%"><tr><td align="center"><img src="images/prefs_guides.png" alt="Guides and Baseline Grid Settings" align="middle" title="Guides and Baseline Grid Settings" width="680" /></td></tr></table>
+<table width="80%"><tr><td valign="top">By default, Guides and Margins will show, but can be changed here, along with the color of each. Major and Minor Grids do not show by default &ndash; here we have changed the default colors so you can easily see the difference in the screenshot to the right, with page edges shown in red, margins in blue, major grid light green, and minor grid in light magenta.
+<p>Finally, at the bottom of the dialog we can choose to show the Baseline Grid by default, and adjust its default settings.
+<p>Find out more about the baseline grid in <a href="WwText.html#10">Working with Text</a>.</td>
+<td><img src="images/prefs_guides1.png"></td>
+</tr>
+</table>
+<h3><a name="4"></a>Typography</h3>
+<p>Here are the default settings for various typographic features &ndash; subscript, superscript, automatic line spacing and scaling of small capitals.
+<p>In addition, the amount of automatic linespacing can be adjusted relative to the size of the font. <em>Note that the 20% is in addition to the space required for the next line of text, so that the total space from one baseline to the next would be 120% of the font size.</em>
+<p><table width="90%"><tr><td align="center"><img src="images/prefs_typog.png" align="center" alt="Typography Tab Panel" width="680"/></td></tr></table>
+<h3><a name="5"></a>Tools</h3>
+<p>In the Tools tab you can change the defaults for text and image frames, shapes and polygons, and lines. In addition, there are page magnification settings, plus the defaults for duplication and rotation of objects.</p>
-<h4>Where Are the Preferences Files ?</h4>
-<p>Scribus' preferences are kept in a hidden directory <code>.scribus</code>. The location of which is as follows:
-<ul>
-<li><strong>Linux:</strong> Under your $home directory, %username/.scribus</li>
-<li><strong>MacOSX:</strong> Under User/%username/.scribus</li>
-<li><strong>Windows:</strong> Documents and Settings/%username/.scribus</li>
-</ul>
- Within the directory is a <code>.scribus13.rc</code> file, a <code>scribusfont.rc</code> file which preserves your font preferences and a <code>prefs13.xml</code>. These files are stored in XML format, so you can inspect its contents with a text editor. If you have installed the scripter plug-in, there will also be a <code>scripter.rc</code> file which lists most recently used scripts. There might also be several directories, which are configuration or history files. If you are troubleshooting starting Scribus, <strong>rename</strong>, do not delete these files and directories. If you rename the directory, on re-starting Scribus, the launch time will be somewhat longer, as Scribus creates a cache of installed fonts. On the second re-start of Scribus, it will be much quicker. </p>
+<table width="100%">
+<tr><td align="center"><img src="images/prefs_tools.png" alt="Tools Tab Panel" width="550"/></td>
+<td><img src="images/prefs_tools1.png" width="500"></tr>
+<tr><td align="center"><img src="images/prefs_tools2.png" alt="Tools Tab Panel" width="500"/></td>
+<td><img src="images/prefs_tools3.png" width="400"></tr>
+<tr><td align="center" colspan="2"><img src="images/prefs_tools4.png" alt="Tools Tab Panel" width="680"/></td></tr>
+<tr><td align="center"><img src="images/prefs_tools5.png" width="400">
+<td align="center"><img src="images/prefs_tools6.png" alt="Tools Tab Panel" width="550"/></td></tr>
+</table>
-<p>You can change the Document Setup preferences while a document is open and those preferences will remain only for the currently open doc. When you change the application preferences, any new documents will inherit these preferences and default settings.</p>
-
-<p>Within these panels below, you can change many of the defaults for Scribus, many of which can be changed or overridden in with a menu or right click context menu on an object while editing or in the measurements palette.</p>
-
-<p><strong>Note: The screen captures below are on Windows 2000, Linux and MacOSX may vary slightly.</strong></p>
-
-<h3>General Tab</h3>
-<p>You can change the default theme with Scribus to include themes like Liquid or the new themes based on KDE plug-ins. Scribus will inherit KDE themes and decorations if you have KDE running. If you do not have KDE installed, you can also tune the look of your Qt programs separately with <strong><code>qtconfig</code></strong> from the command line. Simply open a console window and type <code>qtconfig</code>. The configuration panels in Qtconfig are pretty self explanatory. I would advise not increasing the font size above 12 points, as some buttons in Scribus menus might be obscured. In this example, the fonts have been changed to TrueType fonts at 12 points and Scribus is using the default theme inherited from KDE.</p>
-
-<p>On MacOSX and Windows, you do not need to access qtconfig as it inherits the styles from the operating system. However, changing the default to Platinum or other style, may not appear so attractive and these styles are primarily for Linux and Unix systems.</p>
-
-<table width="100%"><tr><td align="center"><img src="images/prefs.png" align="center" alt="Edit Style Dialog" title="General Preferences" /></td></tr></table>
-
-<p>Note also that the "Languages" drop down can be blank. This merely means Scribus will use the system's default language.</p>
-
-<h3>Mouse settings</h3>
-<p>If you have a wheel mouse, one of the nice defaults of Scribus is using this to scroll through a Document. Wheel jump changes the number of lines for each scroll of the mouse wheel. <strong>Grab Radius</strong> defines how much distance is allowed to select an object. Smaller numbers mean more
-precise, but sometimes more difficult selection of smaller objects.</p>
-
-<h3>Paths</h3>
-<p>These are user selectable paths for your documents, ICC color profiles and python scripts. Changing them is simply clicking on your preferred location. Note: hidden directories are not viewed by default, but can be seen by right clicking the file selector widget and choosing. "Show Hidden".</p>
-
-<h3>Document</h3>
-<p>This panel sets the defaults for paper size, page margins and Auto save options. Auto-save enables Scribus to save your file with a backup file with <code>.sla.bak</code> extension. The section "Preset Layouts" will offer you a choice of standard margin settings, depending on wether you are creating a book, magazine or other document. You can also choose to have the left or right page first as well.</p>
-
-<table width="100%"><tr><td align="center"><img src="images/prefs2.png" align="center" alt="Default Document Settings" title="Default Document Settings" /></td></tr></table>
-
-<h3>Guides</h3>
-<p>This panel sets the default distances and colors, as well as the snap to settings. <strong>Baseline Grids</strong> is the set of horizontal guides which forces text in multiple columns to align horizontally, as shown below. Settings for the distances for baselines are in Paragraph Styles, as well as the next panel <strong>Typography</strong></p>
-
-<table width="100%"><tr><td align="center"><img src="images/prefs3.png" alt="Guides and Baseline Grid Settings" align="middle" title="Guides and Baseline Grid Settings" /></td></tr></table>
-
-<h3>Typography</h3>
-<p>Here you can change options for typographic features including subscript, superscript, automatic line spacing and scaling of small capitals. <strong>Disp.:</strong> means displacement or difference in distance above/below normal text. <strong>Baseline Grids</strong> are non-printing grids which align text across multiple columns on the page. <strong>Baseline Offset</strong> is the distance from the top of the page where the topmost baseline is placed.</p>
-
-<table width="100%"><tr><td align="center"><img src="images/prefsblgrid1.png" alt="Baseline Grids"title="Baseline Grids" /></td></tr></table>
-
-<table width="100%"><tr><td align="center"><img src="images/prefs4.png" align="center" alt="Typography Tab Panel" /></td></tr></table>
-
-<h3>Tools</h3>
-<p>In the Tools tab you can change the defaults for many common tasks and tools: font, size and color, text frame defaults, image frame defaults and zoom defaults. Most all of these can be overridden or changed with the the right click context menu or in the Properties Palette when selecting an object.You can also override these in the Document Setup dialog.</p>
-
-<table width="100%"><tr><td align="center"><img src="images/prefs5.png" alt="Tools Tab Panel"/></td></tr></table>
-
-<h3>Polygon objects</h3>
-<p>You can make stars, triangles and convex polygons with intuitive controls. You can also apply gradient colors to all of these shapes within the measurements panel. </p>
-
-<h3>Hyphenation</h3>
+<h3><a name="6"></a>Hyphenation</h3>
<p>Hyphenation details are described here: <a href="hyphenator.html">Hyphenation in Scribus</a>.</p>
-<h3>Fonts</h3>
+<h3><a name="7"></a>Fonts</h3>
<p>Selecting and installing fonts correctly is one of the most important configuration items with Scribus and an extensive set of notes is here: <a href="fonts1.html">Fonts and Scribus</a>. If there is one part of the documentation you really must read, it is this one.</p>
-<h3>Color Management Settings</h3>
-<p>Note in this dialog, the setting of sRGB is <strong>incorrect</strong> for a monitor profile. There are detailed notes on <a href="cms.html"> Color Management under Scribus</a> and <a href="moncal.html">Creating a Monitor Profile with Littlecms</a>. MacOSX and Windows users can use commercially available tools like Monaco's Color Tools, Eye-One, Adobe Gamma and Scribus can use them along side other color savvy applications. MacOSX users can use any of the profiles available to Color Sync. Scribus will automatically discover any system profiles installed.</p>
-<table width="100%"><tr><td align="center"><img src="images/prefs10.png" alt="Setting the PDF Preferences for Scribus" title="Setting the PDF Preferences for Scribus" /></td></tr></table>
-<p><strong>Note: </strong>PDF/X-3 preferences are disabled if color management is disabled. CMS must be enabled to use PDF/X-3.</p>
+<h3><a name="8"></a>Preflight Verifier</h3>
+Preflight verification (checking for errors) is automatic when exporting to PDF, and also can be chosen separately from the toolbar. Here are the default settings for various items you wish to have checked. You would be ill-advised to check <em>Ignore all errors</em> &ndash; an error discovered after commercial printing could prove to be costly.
+<p><table width="90%"><tr><td align="center"><img src="images/prefs_preflight.png" width="680"></td></tr>
+</table>
-<h3>PDF Export Options</h3>
-<p> For more info on PDF look at <a href="pdfexport1.html">PDF Export Options</a> and <a href="pdfx3.html">PDF/X-3 and Scribus</a>.. This section of the preferences has extensive tool tips as well.</p>
+<h3><a name="9"></a>Color Management</h3>
+<p>There are detailed notes on <a href="cms.html"> Color Management under Scribus</a> and <a href="moncal.html">Creating a Monitor Profile with Littlecms</a>. MacOSX and Windows users can use commercially available tools like Monaco's Color Tools, Eye-One, Adobe Gamma and Scribus can use them along side other color savvy applications. MacOSX users can use any of the profiles available to Color Sync. Scribus will automatically discover any system profiles installed.</p>
+<table width="90%"><tr><td align="center"><img src="images/prefs_colormgmt.png" alt="Color Management Preferences" title="Color Management Preferences" width="680" /></td></tr></table>
+<p><em>Note: You will not be able to export to PDF/X-3 if color management is not enabled, and the Preferences settings for this format will likewise not be available.</em></p>
-<table width="100%"><tr><td align="center"><img src="images/prefs11.png" alt="Setting the PDF Preferences for Scribus" title="Setting the PDF Preferences for Scribus" /></td></tr></table>
+<h3><a name="10"></a>PDF Export</h3>
+<p>Remember that the settings here simply change the default values for PDF Export. You can still override any settings with the PDF Export dialog. For more info on PDF look at <a href="pdfexport1.html">PDF Export Options</a> and <a href="pdfx3.html">PDF/X-3 and Scribus</a>.</p>
-<h3>Documents Items and Table of Contents</h3>
-<p>This new functionality is explained here: <a href="http://wiki.scribus.net/index.php/Creating_a_Table_of_Contents">http://wiki.scribus.net/index.php/Creating_a_Table_of_Contents</a></p>
+<table width="90%" cellpadding="5"><tr><td align="center"><img src="images/prefs_pdfexport.png" alt="PDF Export Preferences" title="PDF Export Preferences" width="680"/></td></tr>
+<tr><td>New to 1.3.5+ versions is the inclusion of the ability to create bleeds, crop marks, and other printer marks as you export to PDF. Any bleed width is added to the page dimensions you selected when you created your document.
+<p>Note here an example of what you see when you do not have ICC profiles installed &ndash; <strong>PDF/X-3 Output Intent</strong> is not available.</td></tr>
+<tr><td align="center"><img src="images/prefs_pdfexport1.png" alt="PDF Export Preferences" title="PDF Export Preferences" width="680"/></td></tr></table>
-<h3>Keyboard Short-Cuts</h3>
+<h3><a name="11"></a>Documents Item Attributes</h3>
+<h3>Table of Contents and Indexes</h3>
+<p>These two subdialogs relate to each other. One use of these features is explained here: <a href="http://wiki.scribus.net/index.php/Creating_a_Table_of_Contents">http://wiki.scribus.net/index.php/Creating_a_Table_of_Contents</a></p>
-<table width="100%"><tr><td align="center"><img src="images/prefs12.png" alt="Setting the Keyboard Shortcuts for Scribus" title="Setting the Keyboard Shortcuts for Scribus" /></td></tr></table>
+<h3><a name="12"></a>Keyboard Shortcuts</h3>
-<p>Scribus gives you complete flexibility with respect to keyboard shortcuts. Moreover, once customized, you can export them into a separate XML file which can be exported and saved separately, along with making it portable to other machines. The default file suffix is .ksxml. The XML is a unicode file and should not have issues being transported across platforms, with the only caveat that Macs have an option and command meta key, where Linux and Windows share common keyboards.</p>
+<table width="90%"><tr><td align="center"><img src="images/prefs_keyboard.png" alt="Setting the Keyboard Shortcuts for Scribus" title="Setting the Keyboard Shortcuts for Scribus" width="680"/></td></tr></table>
-<h3>Scrapbook</h3>
+<p>Here you see the various default keyboard shortcuts, which are editable, and many others can be assigned. These are stored in the <tt>.scribus/scribus135.rc</tt> file. Moreover, once customized, you can export them into a separate XML file which can be exported and saved separately, along with making it portable to other machines. The default file suffix is .ksxml. The XML is a unicode file and should not have issues being transported across platforms, with the only caveat that Macs have an option and command meta key, where Linux and Windows share common keyboards.</p>
+
+<h3><a name="13"></a>Scrapbook</h3>
<p>With scrapbooks, you can <em>right button</em> drag and drop frequently used items, including pictures, images and text files for quick placement. Scrapbooks can be saved with a file or independently of a document, as a separate scrapbook which can be loaded use with many different Documents. Separate scrapbooks are kept with a <code>.scs</code> designation. This panel sets the defaults for the thumbnail size in the scrapbook palette and if scrapbooks should be saved automatically when changed.</p>
-<h3>Display</h3>
-<p>This panel sets the defaults and options for margin colors, frame display, page background and you have the option to display unprintable areas in the selected margin color. You can also enable page side by side or also known in DTP lingo as &#034;reader spreads&#034;. The Adjust Display Size enables you to adjust the screen sizing in order that 1 inch on the screen actually measures 1 inch. Just take an accurate ruler and place it on the screen and adjust the slider until it matches your ruler</p>
+<h3><a name="14"></a>Display (not all of these available in Document Settings)</h3>
+<p>Most of these are pretty straightforward. Depending on the size of your screen, you can use this to adjust the rescale and rearrange your workspace. If you have plenty of space, you may want to adjust the display to accurately reflect your document size by default. Remember, you can adjust the magnification settings in <em>Tools > Zoom</em>.</p>
-<table width="100%"><tr><td align="center"><img src="images/prefsdisplay.png" alt="Global Color Management Preferences for Scribus" title="Global Color Management Preferences for Scribus" /></td></tr></table>
+<table width="90%"><tr><td align="center"><img src="images/prefs_display.png" alt="Display Settings" title="Display Settings" width="680" /></td></tr></table>
-<h3>External Tools</h3>
+<p>The Colors tab allows for customization of the colors used for various screen features, such as marking the margins, grids, and guides. In Document Settings only Fill Color is available. It's also worth mentioning here that the Fill Color only has to do with the <em>appearance</em> of the document background and is not printed or exported to PDF.
+<h3><a name="15"></a>External Tools</h3>
<p>This panel enables you to change the default settings for the location of Ghostscript and your preferred image editing tool. If you have installed Ghostscript on Windows before installing Scribus, it is usually automatically detected.If you receive an error message on Windows indicating EPS files cannot be used. This is where the settings can be changed to allow Scribus to find the correct location of Ghostscript.</p>
-<p><strong>On Linux:</strong></p>
-<table width="100%"><tr><td align="center"><img src="images/gsadv2.png" alt="External Tools Settings" title="External Tools Settings" /></td></tr></table>
-<p> In the example above, a parallel build of Ghostscript 8.53 has been installed in <code>/usr/local/bin/</code> for better results with EPS,PS and PDF importing, as well as speedier print-previews. Linux and Unix users should see the hints in <a href="toolbox7.html" title="Advanced Setup of Ghostscript">Advanced Ghostscript.</a></p>
-<p>You can use any available image editor including cinepaint, krita and even Photoshop with wine. With Crossover, you would use (with quotes) in the dialog something like this :
-
-<pre>"/opt/cxoffice/bin/wine" --workdir "C://Adobe" --check --cx-app "C:////Adobe////Photoshp.exe"</pre>
- You can copy the exact settings from the desktop shortcut from the menu editor in KDE.</p>
-<p> One other important note, when using the GIMP as your image editor, <strong>you must close GIMP completely before, control will return to Scribus.</strong> The workaround for this is to use <strong>gimp-remote</strong>
+<p><strong>On Linux and Windows:</strong></p>
+<table width="90%"><tr><td align="center"><img src="images/prefs_exttools.png" alt="External Tools Settings" title="External Tools Settings" width="680" /></td></tr></table>
+<p>This particular screenshot comes from Linux, but Windows will have all of these same settings. If you do need to search for Ghostscript in Windows, the particular executable you need (for 32-bit) is named <tt>gswin32c.exe</tt> <em>not</em> <tt>gswin32.exe</tt>. Some additional information about Ghostscript can be found in <a href="toolbox7.html" title="Advanced Setup of Ghostscript">Advanced Ghostscript.</a></p>
+<p>You are not restricted to using Gimp for image editing, and could use any available image editor such as Cinepaint, Krita, or even Photoshop.
+<p>Although it was formerly necessary to close Gimp after editing, this is no longer necessary. If Gimp is already running, you will either need to close it to have the image file automatically loaded to Gimp, or get the file using Gimp's Open dialog.
<p><strong>On MacOSX</strong></p>
-<p>Depending on the language settings, the Preferences menu entry appears under Edit->Preferences or under Scribus->Preferences.
-If <strong>both</strong> entries are present, the one under Scribus->Preferences will <strong>not</strong> work. This is a limitation in the Qt3 libraries.
-</p>
<table width="100%"><tr><td align="center"><img src="images/prefs-mac-1.png" alt="External Tools Settings" title="External Tools Settings" /></td></tr></table>
<p>Above are the recommended settings, provided you are using GIMP and/or if you have installed the Ghostscript.framework from <a href="http://aqua.scribus.net">http://aqua.scribus.net</a>.</p>
-<p><strong>On Windows:</strong></p>
-<p><em>Note the correct .exe name for Ghostscript is gswin32c.exe, <strong>not</strong> gswin32.exe.</em></p>
-<table width="100%"><tr><td align="center"><img src="images/prefs15.png" alt="External Tools Settings" title="External Tools Settings" /></td></tr></table>
-<p>To use GIMP as your image editor on Windows , <strong>you must close GIMP completely before control will return to Scribus.</strong> The workaround for this is to use <strong>c:\path to\gimp-remote.exe gimp-2.2.exe</strong> as shown instead.<br /> The default on windows is:<br /> <code>C:/Program Files/GIMP-2.0/bin/gimp-win-remote.exe gimp-2.2.exe</code> This will then either start a new instance of gimp or use the currently running version of gimp. </p>
+<h3><a name="16"></a>Miscellaneous</h3>
+<table width="80%"><tr><td align="center"><img src="images/prefs_misc.png" title="Miscellaneous Settings"></td></tr></table>
+<h3><a name="17"></a>Plugins</h3>
+<p>This is an informational display about the various plugins you have at your disposal, how to activate them, and where their libraries are located.
-<p></p>
+<h3><a name="18"></a>Short Words</h3>
+<img src="images/prefs_shortwords.png">
+<p>Short Words is a plug-in to assist adding non breaking spaces to short words like Mr. and measurements like km. It may not be immediately obvious, but there to two kinds of these spaces, placed either before (for something like kg) or after (for something like Mr.). Directly edit in this panel and save. Details on configuration and use are here: <a href="short-words.html">Short Words in Scribus</a>. </p>
-
-<h3>Miscellaneous</h3>
+<h3><a name="19"></a>Scripter</h3>
+If the Scripter plugin is activated at startup, you will not need to make any changes here to use the included Python scripts.
+<p>Scripter Extensions are special scripter module or scripts which are loaded at startup to modify the abilities of the python scripter plug-in within Scribus. Details are here: <a href="scripter-extensions.html">Scripter Extensions Howto</a>. The console tab is for choosing syntax highlighting colors within the scripter console.</p>
+<h3><a name="20"></a>Document Information (available in Document Settings but not in Preferences)</h3>
+There are a number of informational elements which can be saved with your file. Those that will be accessible and display in Properties in Adobe Reader (9.x) are Title, Author, and Keywords.
+<h4>Where Are the Preferences Files ?</h4>
+<p>Scribus' preferences are kept in a hidden directory <code>.scribus</code>. The location of which is as follows:
<ul>
- <li><strong>Clip to Page Margins</strong> - This option prevents any object which in not within the page margins from either printing or being exported to PDF. The content of an object within the margins will still print or export. </li>
- <li><strong>Under Color Removal</strong> - This option changes the way grays are composed when printing. This is most often used with newsprint or other low gamut media. </li>
- <li><strong>Always ask before replacing fonts</strong> - This option will prompt you to choose replacement fonts when they are missing from your system when a document uses them in a layout.</li>
- <li><strong>Preview </strong>of current style when editing paragraph styles, is an option to have a preview of your paragraph including the font used, font size and alignment using Lorem Ipsum (dummy) text. </li>
- <li><strong>Show Startup Dialog</strong> - If you disabled the startup dialog, you can re-enable this here. </li>
-<li><strong>Lorem Ipsum</strong> - Lorem Ipsum is actually Latin text of a famous speech by Cicero, which has been used in page layout for a long time. This allows a designer to make a layout with dummy text which few people can actually read and moreover it uses most of the Roman alphabet. When inserting sample text into a text frame, you can choose the language and number of paragraphs. This option enforces the same settings for all documents.</li>
- </ul>
+<li><strong>Linux:</strong> Under your $home directory, %username/.scribus</li>
+<li><strong>MacOSX:</strong> Under User/%username/.scribus</li>
+<li><strong>Windows:</strong> Documents and Settings/%username/.scribus</li>
+</ul>
+ Within the directory is a <code>.scribus13.rc</code> file, a <code>scribusfont.rc</code> file which preserves your font preferences and a <code>prefs13.xml</code>. These files are stored in XML format, so you can inspect its contents with a text editor. If you have installed the scripter plug-in, there will also be a <code>scripter.rc</code> file which lists most recently used scripts. There might also be several directories, which are configuration or history files. If you are troubleshooting starting Scribus, <strong>rename</strong>, do not delete these files and directories. If you rename the directory, on re-starting Scribus, the launch time will be somewhat longer, as Scribus creates a cache of installed fonts. On the second re-start of Scribus, it will be much quicker. </p>
-<h3>Plugins</h3>
-<p>This panel controls the loading and displays the type of plugins available to Scribus. Normally, you should not need to touch this panel.</p>
-
-<h3>Short Words</h3>
-<p>Short Words is a plug-in to assist adding non breaking spaces to short words like Jr. measurements like km Details on configuration and use are here: <a href="short-words.html">Short Words in Scribus</a>. </p>
-
-<h3>Scripter</h3>
-<p>Scripter Extensions are special scripter module or scripts which are loaded at startup to modify the abilities of the python scripter plug-in within Scribus. Details are here: <a href="scripter-extensions.html">Scripter Extensions Howto</a>. The console tab is for choosing syntax highlighting colors within the scripter console.</p>
-<br />
</body>
-</html>
\ No newline at end of file
+</html>
/trunk/Scribus/doc/en/WwRenderframes.html
0,0 → 1,255
<body>
<head><TITLE>Working with Render Frames</TITLE></head>
<body>
<h1>Introduction</h1>
<p>Since version 1.3.5 Scribus contains a powerful new feature called
Render Frames. Originally planned as a means to insert formulas into
Scribus documents, the inventor, Hermann Kraus, has enabled the
creation of almost any kind of special typesetting, like formulas,
musical notation or chess notation, from within Scribus. The trick here is that Scribus uses other programs in the background. It imports their output into a special frame type called <b>Render Frames</b>.</p>
<p>While this feature is extremely versatile, you must not forget
that the use of it requires knowledge of the markup codes
required by a particular program. These commands are beyond the scope
of the Scribus documentation.</p>
<h1>Creating a Render Frame</h1>
<p>To create a Render Frame, click on the Render Frame icon in the
menu bar, use <i>Insert &gt; Render Frame</i>, or press D on the
keyboard:</p>
<table width="100%"><tr><td align="center"><img src="images/rf2.png"/></td></tr></table>
<p>The cursor will then turn into a frame symbol with an L inside:</p>
<table width="100%"><tr><td align="center"><img src="images/DrawLatexFrame.png"/></td></tr></table>
<p><br><br>
</p>
<p>The next step is to click-drag the frame and let up, just like you would do
with a text frame. By default, Scribus will display a welcome
message, which indicates that at least the configuration for LaTeX is
correct. What you see below is the output from LaTeX, rendered in Scribus.
The welcome message will be displayed in the language of the user
interface as set in <i>File &gt; Preferences</i>. If no translation
of the message is available, you will see the English version:</p>
<table width="100%"><tr><td align="center"><img src="images/rf3.png"/></td></tr></table>
<p>The
screenshot above has been made with the default resolution of 72 dpi,
which, obviously, isn't enough for printing. You can easily change
the resolution as you'll learn below.</p>
<h1>Editing Render Frames</h1>
<p>If
you right-click on a Render Frame, the context menu shows an entry
called "Edit Source:"</p>
<table width="100%"><tr><td align="center"><img src="images/rf4.png"/></td></tr></table>
<p>Selecting it brings up the "heart" of the Render Frame, the
editor:</p>
<table width="100%"><tr><td align="center"><img src="images/rf5.png"/></td></tr></table>
<p>In Scribus 1.3.5, the editor is preconfigured to use LaTeX,
Lilypond, gnuplot, dot/GraphViz and POV-Ray.</p>
<p>To the left you see a field with the caption "Enter Code."
Here you can insert the markup code for the output you want from the
external program. For preconfigured renderers Scribus is shipped with some simple code snippets that will enable you to test if the respective programs are installed and configured properly. As you can see, the editor provides syntax
highlighting.</p>
<p>The "Update" button beneath the text field will update the
content of the Render Frame, so that you can visually check the
results of changes you made to the markup text without closing the editor. "Revert" will
revert any change you made to the text. Please be aware that once you started editing the text, it's no longer possible to change the markup renderer, e.g., if you started editing LaTeX sourcecode, you cannot switch to Lilypond anymore.</p>
<p>To the right you see a row of tabs. These are not available for
all preconfigured markup languages, so sometimes the editor only shows the
"Options" tab.
</p>
<p>In the "Options" tab, the first entry is "Resolution." Its
default setting is "Automatic," thus, 72 dpi as explained above.
You can easily change the resolution of the output to something more
suitable for printing.</p>
<p>"Program" shows the list of supported programs. The editor
will list all programs that are configured in <I>File &gt;
Preferences&gt; External Tools</I>.</p>
<p>If you check "Use Preamble," the editor will automatically use
the preamble and the postamble as specified in the XML configuration
files. See below for more details.</p>
<p>"Program Messages" shows the messages that would otherwise be
displayed in a command-line interpreter. They are "intercepted"
by Scribus, just like the final output, and they are often useful to
find out what went wrong if the rendering failed.</p>
<p>If you click on "Run external editor," Scribus will start the
editor as specified in <i>File &gt; Preferences</i>,
and "Kill Program" will stop the external program. This can be
useful when the external program stumbles across an error you made in
your markup that causes the external program to fail or even crash.</p>
<h1>Preconfigured Programs</h1>
<h2>LaTeX</h2>
<table width="100%"><tr><td align="center"><img src="images/rf6.png"/></td></tr></table>
<p>The first LaTeX tab is called
"Fonts/Headers." In the upper drop-down list you can set the font
used for a Render Frame that uses LaTeX. By default, only four fonts
are listed, but you can easily add more by editing the LaTeX XML
configuration file as described in detail below: Just add another font under <code>&lt;list name=&quot;font&quot;
default=&quot;&quot;&gt;</code> in the file. Please note that the font list
for LaTeX (and many other markup programs) is completely different
from the fonts available to you in Scribus and other programs, as
LaTeX uses its own fonts and needs to be configured to use the Type&nbsp;1, TrueType and OpenType fonts available to you in programs like
Scribus or OpenOffice.org. For more information about LaTeX font configuration see the <a href="http://www.latex-project.org/guides/fntguide.pdf">LaTeX Font Selection Guide (PDF)</a>.</p>
<p>The next drop-down list allows
for changing the default font size. If you are used to LaTeX, you
will already know that this is the setting for the base font. Other
necessary font sizes, e.g. for superscript and subscript are
determined by LaTeX. You will also note that the editor lists only a
selection of base font sizes. Again, you can easily add other sizes
under <code>&lt;list name=&quot;fontsize&quot; default=&quot;11pt&quot;&gt;</code>
in the LaTeX XML configuration file. Since there are almost no limits
as to the possibilities you have for the configuration of a LaTeX
file, you will appreciate the option to select different XML
configuration files in <i>File &gt; Preferences &gt; External
Tools</i>.</p>
<p>The text field "Additional
Headers" allows for the insertion of additional headers to the
preamble of the LaTeX markup, which will be stored within the Scribus sla
file.</p>
<p>Finally, you find different tabs
with symbols and characters that can be created by LaTeX:</p>
<table width="100%"><tr><td align="center"><img src="images/rf7.png"/></td></tr></table>
<p>To
insert a single symbol into your markup code, you can either select
the symbol and click "Insert Symbol" or double-click on the icon
in the field.</p>
<p>For more information see the <a href="http://www.latex-project.org/">official LaTeX website</a>.</p>
 
<h2>Lilypond</h2>
 
<table width="100%"><tr><td align="center"><img src="images/lilyp.png"/></td></tr></table>
 
There are no additional options for Lilypond available.
<p>For more information see the <a href="http://lilypond.org/web/">official Lilypond website</a>.</p>
 
<h2>gnuplot</h2>
 
<table width="100%"><tr><td align="center"><img src="images/plot1.png"/></td></tr></table>
<br></br>
The gnuplot options are very basic. Under <i>Ranges</i> you can enter the start and end digits for the x- and the y-axis. The default is an asterisk, which will result in gnuplot creating the digits automatically, according to the values set in the markup text.
<br></br>
<table width="100%"><tr><td align="center"><img src="images/plot2.png"/></td></tr></table>
<br></br>
The tab called <i>Labels</i> serves as an assistant to determine some visual aspects of a graph:
 
<ul>
<li><i>Title</i> will create a title for your graph, which will be placed at the top of the rendered image.</li>
<li><i>X-Label</i> and <i>Y-Label</i> will create captions for the x- and y-axis.</li>
<li><i>Grid</i> and <i>Grid layer</i> work similiar to the guides/page grid settings in Scribus, except that the grid in the graph will become part of the rendered image. You can choose between no grid at all, the major grid ("Major ticks only") and major plus minor grid ("Major and minor ticks"). Just like in Scribus you can also decide to have the grid rendered in the background or in the foreground.</li>
<li><i>Zero axis</i> will create a dotted line to indicate either the x- or the y-axis, or both. Note that using any grid will make the setting of any zero axis unnecessary, as both use the same colour. If you want to use a different line style for grid and the axes, you have to do this in the markup text. Likewise, adding a z-axis requires the editing of the graph's source code.</li>
</ul>
 
<p>For more information see the <a href="http://www.gnuplot.info/">official gnuplot website</a>.</p>
 
<h2>dot/Graphviz</h2>
 
There are no additional options for dot/Graphviz available.
 
<p>For more information see the <a href="http://www.graphviz.org/">official Graphviz website</a>.</p>
 
<h2>POV-Ray</h2>
 
<table width="100%"><tr><td align="center"><img src="images/povray.png"/></td></tr></table>
<br></br>
<p>The editor offers only one tab for the rendering of POV-Ray files, namley "Rendering Options:" </p>
<ul>
<li><i>Quality</i> provides the same seven quality levels as the POV-Ray command-line interface, and the editor uses the same default level ("Compute media and radiosity"). Otherwise, the quality levels are listed in an ascending order, "Just show quick colors" providing the lowest quality.</li>
<li><i>Antialiasing</i> is a technique to "smoothen" edges in a rendered image. It can dramatically improve the quality of an image, but using it may result in much longer rendering times. The options <i>Antialiasing Threshold</i> and <i>Antialiasing Depth</i> are explained in detail in the POV-Ray documentation, but the default values should suffice in most cases.</li></ul>
 
<p>For more information see the <a href="http://www.povray.org/">official POV-Ray website</a>.</p>
 
<h1>Rendering</h1>
<p>Once you have created the markup
to your satisfaction, you can click the "OK" button.</p>
<p>If you made a mistake, and the
external program cannot render your markup, Scribus displays an error
message:</p>
<table width="100%"><tr><td align="center"><img src="images/rf8.png"/></td></tr></table>
<p><br><br>
</p>
<p>A blue X in the Render Frame along with an error message will
then indicate that no content could be rendered:</p>
<table width="100%"><tr><td align="center"><img src="images/rf-error2.png"/></td></tr></table>
<h2>Additional Notes</h2>
<p>If you look at the context menu
for Render Frames, you will get the impression that they are image
frames. In a sense, that's correct, as you can change the preview
settings for Render Frames or update the content. There is, however,
a major difference: As said above, the markup text ist stored within
a Scribus file, and the rendered content is always created "on the
fly." Each time you open a Scribus file that contains a Render
Frame, Scribus will run the respective program that's necessary to
render the content and create a temporary image file which will then
be loaded into the frame. This is why Render Frames aren't listed in
<i>Extras &gt; Manage Images</i>.</p>
<p>This behaviour has some
consequences. While you can use a Scribus file with images on another
computer by using <i>File &gt; Collect for Output</i>
and copying the resulting archive to another machine, Render Frames
require the presence of the used <i>software</i>
on this machine. Moreover, the feature might not work between
different operating systems, because the command-line options can be
different.</p>
<p>Another limitation is that you can't apply any image effects to Render Frames.</p>
 
<h1>Configuration</h1>
<p>To make Render Frames work, you need to have the required programs
installed on your computer. By default, Scribus supports five
programs, namely LaTeX, Lilypond, gnuplot, dot/Graphviz and Lilypond. On Linux,
your package manager will take care about the installation and the
dependencies of the software. On other platforms you might need to
install the programs separately and edit some configuration files.</p>
<p>If you open the tab "External Tools" in <i>File &gt;
Preferences</i>, you see the configuration options for Render Frames
at the bottom of the dialog:</p>
<table width="100%"><tr><td align="center"><img src="images/rf1.png"/></td></tr></table>
 
<p>Under "Configurations," Scribus shows the default configuration files. Each program you want to use from within Scribus needs a separate configuration file. To add a new program to your Render Frames, you have to create an XML file with some required settings. Below you see an abridged and commented gnuplot configuration file, which will serve as an example:</p>
 
<p><code>&lt;editorsettings description="Gnuplot" icon="gnuplot.png"&gt;</code> This line sets the description of the program, as well as the icon for the drop-down list in the Render Frame Editor. It must be stored in the same directory as the XML file. You can use PNG, XPM and SVG icons.</p>
<p><code>&lt;executable command="gnuplot"&gt;</code> This is the command-line call of the program. You can only use software that can work on the command-line. Also, the program needs to be able to create output in either PNG, PDF or EPS format. By default, Scribus uses the command-line options for Linux/UNIX systems.</p>
<p><code>&lt;imagefile extension=".png"/&gt;</code> Here you tell the editor which file format it has to expect from the external program.</p>
<p><code>&lt;highlighter&gt; &lt;/highlighter&gt;</code> This part is mainly interesting for programmers, as it allows for the creation of indvidual syntax highlighting schemes by using Regular Expressions. For further information see: <a href="http://docs.kde.org/kde3/en/kdeutils/KRegExpEditor/index.html">http://docs.kde.org/kde3/en/kdeutils/KRegExpEditor/index.html</a> and <a href="http://doc.trolltech.com/4.4/qregexp.html">http://doc.trolltech.com/4.4/qregexp.html</a>.</p>
<p><code>&lt;empty-frame-text&gt;</code> Here you can enter sample text in the
markup language of the program you want to use, for instance:</p>
<p><code>plot sin(x), (cos(x))**2</code></p>
</p><code>&lt;preamble&gt;</code> If the markup language you
want to use requires a preamble, you can enter it here. It will not
be displayed in the editor.</p>
<p><code>&lt;postamble&gt;</code> If the markup language you
want to use requires a postamble, you can enter it here. It will not
be displayed in the editor.</p>
<p><code>&lt;tab type="settings"&gt;</code> Here's where translations to existing GUI strings as well as new tabs or other UI elements can be added via simple XML entries, for example:</p>
<p><code>&lt;title&gt;&lt;i18n&gt;</code>
<p6><code>
<ul>
<li>&lt;en&gt;Ranges&lt;/en&gt;
<li>&lt;de&gt;Bereiche&lt;/de&gt;
<li>&lt;fr&gt;Rangées&lt;/fr&gt;
<li>&lt;pl&gt;Zakresy&lt;/pl&gt;
<li>&lt;ru&gt;&#1044;&#1080;&#1072;&#1087;&#1072;&#1079;&#1086;&#1085;&#1099;&lt;/ru&gt;
</ul></code></p6>
 
<p>To add a new configuration file, click on the "Add..."
button, which will bring up a file dialog. Select your file and click
"Open." The file will then be added to your Render Frame
configuration.</p>
<p>By moving entries of XML configuration files in the list up or
down, you can change the order of entries in the editor's drop down
list. If you want to use a different XML configuration file for a
particular markup language (for example, if you need another default
preamble for LaTeX frames in a project), you can change the path to
the alternative file by clicking on "Change ..." or simply add a new configuration file with an appropriate name, like "MyLateX".</p>
<br>If you prefer another editor for your markup, for example if you can't live without Emacs or vi, or if the editor window is simply too small for you, you can override the built-in Scribus Render Frame Editor by using
another editor like vi or Kate. Just insert the path to the
executable file in the text field "External Editor." The external editor won't override the Render Frame editor: As soon as
you save your markup from the external editor, Scribus "intercepts"
the data and renders the output into the frame or will display error messages in the "Program Messages" field. The interception also
means that any change to the markup text won't be saved anywhere but
in your Scribus file. If you haven't specified an external editor in <i>Preferences &lt; Tools</i>, Scribus will display an error message:</p>
<br></br>
<table width="100%"><tr><td align="center"><img src="images/rf-error3.png"/></td></tr></table>
<br></br>
<p>In addition, you have the option to start with an empty frame. By checking
"Force DPI," Scribus will render the output of every Render Frame with the resolution
set in the spinbox to the right. It's set to 72 dpi by default for
performance reasons. If you want to produce a document for
professional printing, you will want to choose a higher resolution.</p>
</body>
</html>
Property changes:
Added: svn:executable
## -0,0 +1 ##
+*
\ No newline at end of property
Index: en/WwShapes.html
===================================================================
--- en/WwShapes.html (nonexistent)
+++ en/WwShapes.html (revision 15137)
@@ -0,0 +1,62 @@
+<html>
+<head>
+ <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8"/>
+ <title>Working with Shapes & Polygons</title>
+</head>
+
+<h2>Working with Shapes & Polygons</h2>
+
+In <a href="WwFrames.html">Working with Frames</a> there is information on manipulation of frames which is applicable to all frame types. There we only explained how to start creation of shapes and polygons by using the appropriate toolbar icon, or using keyboard <b>S</b> or <b>P</b>.
+<p>With shapes and polygons, you have a number of choices to make with each about what kind of shape or polygon to create. All of these are vector drawings, so you can freely resize or edit them after creation. Let's start with shapes.
+
+<h3>Shapes</h3>
+<table cellpadding=5><tr>
+<td>Shapes are a collection of predetermined shapes, and with version 1.3.5+ have been greatly increased in number. The default shape when you start Scribus is the simple rectangular shape which the icon shows. Just to the right side of the shape figure on the toolbar is an arrow for a drop down list of subselections. Once you select from a drop down category and specific type (click with the mouse), you see the toolbar icon change to your selected shape. <i>Note: the appearance of the Shapes icons has been enhanced in the image to the right &ndash; they will not appear as distinct as this.</i>
+<p>As stated in Working with Frames, the default line and fill color for shapes and polygons is black. You can change that for the current documents in <i>File > Document Setup > Tools > Shape (icon)</i>, and for future documents in <i>File > Preferences > Tools > Shape (icon)</i>.
+<p>Just like other frames, you simply click-drag from one corner of the shape to its opposite. If you hold down Shift while click-dragging, when you let up on the mouse the shape will fill to the margins of your page.</td><td>
+<img src="images/shapes8.png" ALT="Shapes Drop-down lists" ALIGN=right></td>
+</tr>
+</table>
+
+<table cellpadding=5 width="80%"><tr><td><img src="images/shapes7.png" ALT="Enter Object Size Dialog"></td>
+<td>Another option with shapes is to make your selection from the list, then simply click on the page, i.e., do not drag the mouse. This brings up a new dialog, <b>Enter Object Size</b>, in which you can make a shape of pre-determined dimensions.
+<p>This would be useful, for example, for making an exact square or circle. The <b>Origin</b> relates to the point on the page where you clicked to bring up this dialog.
+</td></tr>
+</table>
+<br clear=all>
+<h3>Polygons</h3>
+<table cellpadding=5><tr>
+<td>Polygons in Scribus are regular polygons, which when drawn with equal width and height dimensions, will have equal sides and angles. Default is for 4 sides (corners), although you may have anything from 3 to 999 sides. The Polygons icon will always show a pentagon, but by selecting Properties from the drop-down you get the dialog to the right. As you see, your choices here are restricted to the geometry of the polygon. You can set defaults for line and fill colors and shading, and line thickness in <i>File > Preferences > Tools > Shape (icon)</i> or in <i>File > Document Settings > Tools > Shape (icon)</i>. Your choices in <i>File > Preferences > Tools > Polygon (icon)</i> and in <i>File > Document Settings > Tools > Polygon (icon)</i> will be limited to what you see here in the <i>Polygon Properties</i> dialog.
+<p>Number of <b>Corners</b> and <b>Rotation</b> need no explanation, but note that the rotation can be set in the spinbox or with the slider. <b>Apply Factor</b> is not so intuitive, but the small preview will quickly show you that a factor of less than 0% will bend the sides inward at the midpoint, and greater than 0% bend them outward. <b>Curvature</b> transforms the angulated bend into a curve instead.
+</td>
+<td><img src="images/polygons.png" ALT="Polygon Properties" ALIGN=right></td></tr>
+</table>
+<p>The best way to learn what the various settings do is simply to play with them then see the results. If you draw your polygon with unequal width and height, you will see various kinds of distortions compared to the small preview window. Below are some variations on a 4 and a 7-sided polygon which you might try to duplicate.
+<p>Just as with shapes, if you activate the polygons icon, then click the canvas, you will get the <b>Enter Object Size</b> dialog.
+<table><tr><td><img src="images/polygons1.png" ALT="Polygon examples" ALIGN=left></td></tr>
+</table>
+<h3>Context Menu</h3>
+<table cellpadding=5><tr><td><img src="images/context_shape.png" ALT="Context Menu Shapes" ALIGN=right></td>
+<td>The context menu with shapes and polygons has fewer choices than with text or image frames.
+<ul>
+<li><b>Undo</b> is active only when there is some operation on the frame which can be undone.</li>
+<li><b>Redo</b> is only present when some action has been undone.</li>
+<li><b>Attributes</b> will not be covered here.</li>
+<li><b>Is Locked</b> can be checked to lock all features of the object.</li>
+<li><b>Size is Locked</b> locks only that feature.</li>
+<li><b>Send to Scrapbook</b> and <b>Send to Patterns</b> allow you to easily use the object again in this or another document.</li>
+<li><b>Send to Layer</b> is present when your document has more than one layer.</li>
+<li><b>Level</b> is for raising or lowering this object relative to others on this layer.</li>
+<li><b>Convert to</b> allows conversion to</li>
+<ul><li>Bezier curve - this would be necessary to <b>Attach Text to Path</b> using a shape or polygon.</li>
+<li>Image Frame - you may need to edit line and fill colors. If your image completely fills the frame, the fill color will not show unless there is transparency.</li>
+<li>Text Frame - you may need to edit line and fill colors.</li>
+</ul>
+<li><b>Cut</b>, <b>Copy</b>, and <b>Delete</b> are covered in Working with Frames</li>
+<li><b>Properties</b> simply shows or hides the Properties palette.</li>
+</ul>
+</td</tr>
+</table>
+<h4>Editing Shapes</h4>
+This will be handled in <a href="EditingShapes.html">its own section</a>, since it has much greater applicability than just to geometric figures.
+</html>
/en/WwShapes.html
Property changes:
Added: svn:executable
## -0,0 +1 ##
+*
\ No newline at end of property
Index: en/WwStyles.html
===================================================================
--- en/WwStyles.html (nonexistent)
+++ en/WwStyles.html (revision 15137)
@@ -0,0 +1,62 @@
+<html>
+<head>
+ <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8"/>
+ <title>Working with Styles</title>
+</head>
+<body>
+<h2>Working with Styles</h2>
+Why would someone want to use styles, or why might they be a good idea? Just what are styles in Scribus?
+<p>There are two main categories of styles in Scribus, which you will see if you bring up the <b>Style Manager</b> dialog with <i>Edit > Styles</i>. The first is <b>Line Styles</b>, which will be discussed elsewhere in <a href="WwLines.html">Working with Lines & Line Styles</a>. The other kind of style applies to text layout, and you will see that this has two subtypes, Paragraph Styles and Character Styles. You will also see that there are defaults for each of these. These default settings come in part from the default font settings in <i>File > Preferences > Tools</i> for text frames, but you can also edit the default styles here in the Style Manager.
+<p><b>Paragraph Styles</b> are applied to an entire paragraph of text, as the name implies, while <b>Character Styles</b> will be applied to a collection of letters, words, or even paragraphs of text irrespective of the paragraph style setting. It gets even a bit more confusing since a paragraph style will always contain a character style within its definition.
+<p>The why of styles is a matter of convenience, but also of easily achieving a consistent look in a document. For a newsletter, one may want to always use a precise collection of font attributes for headings, the body of the text, sidebars, whatever elements your newsletter may contain. Another convenience with styles is that, once you have applied them, if you edit a style later, the changes will automatically be applied wherever that style is used. Furthermore, styles can be imported from other Scribus documents, or you may clone a style to slightly modify it for some other purpose. Lastly, if you use OpenOffice.org and save in ODT format, you can import and automatically create any styles in Scribus that you may have created in Writer.
+<p>With this brief introduction, let's start by making some paragraph styles.
+<h3>Paragraph Styles</h3>
+<table width="80%" cellpadding="5">
+<tr><td rowspan="3"><img src="images/style_manager1.png"></td>
+<td>When you open the styles dialog, it may have the appearance you see here or be expanded. We'll imagine that we want to create two styles for a newsletter, one style for headings/titles, and another for body text. We want headings to stand out from the body text, and the body text should be pleasing to the eye and have easy legibility &ndash; we will not spend time on the pros and cons of font choice in various settings, since many factors may be involved.</td></tr>
+<tr><td><img src="images/style_manager1b.png"></td>
+</tr>
+<tr><td>Click the <b>New</b> button for the drop-down list and select <b>Paragraph Style</b>. The default name will be <i>New Style</i>. Initially, the <i>Properties</i> tab will be active, and as you can see, this has settings for various attributes of our glyphs in relationship to lines, other paragraphs, the margins and tabulators, but nothing about the font itself.</td></tr>
+</table>
+<img src="images/style_manager3b.png">
+<p>We will not cover various items that you will find in <a href="WwText.html">Working with Text</a>, but mainly focus here on settings that are <i>not</i> in the Text tab of the Properties palette.
+<p>Underneath the linespacing settings we see two spinboxes for determining the white space above and below the paragraph this style is used for. Any space setting will add to the space set for the preceding or following paragraphs.
+<p>Down below the tabulator settings we also saw in Properties are spinboxes which control indentation.
+<p>On the left-top, we can set the indentation of the first line of a paragraph <i>relative to the left margin of the paragraph</i>. Assign a negative value for so-called hanging indent.
+<p>On the left-bottom, we set any paragraph-wide indentation from the other settings of the frame &ndash; this include the border of the frame and also any left text distance setting for the frame &ndash; this defines the left margin of the paragraph as just mentioned. You can only set for a hanging indent when this value has some positive number, and the absolute value of the hanging indent can be no larger than this value. <i>Example: if you want a hanging indent of -15 pts, you will need a paragraph margin setting of 15 pts or greater.</i>
+<p>Finally, on the right, we have the right margin of the paragraph, analogous to the paragraph-wide left indentation just mentioned.
+<p>
+<table width="70%">
+<tr><td valign="top">Here we show a hanging indent and extra space above paragraphs &ndash; note that the space above paragraph does not apply to the first paragraph in the frame.</td>
+<td><img src="images/style_manager7.png"></td>
+</tr></table>
+<h4>Drop Caps</h4>
+<table width="70%">
+<tr><td valign="top">Drop caps are enlarged first letters of a paragraph, which overlap two or more lines of text. The value for <b>Lines</b> must be an integer.
+<p>The <b>Distance from Text</b> applies to the space to the right of the enlarged letter. This distance can be a negative number, even though it would seem that might have limited utility.
+<p>Here we see examples of drop caps, the top and middle with a distance from text of 0, and in the bottom paragraph a distance of 10 pts. The middle paragraph has the drop cap set at 3 lines, and also uses a hanging indent for additional effect.
+<p>Drop caps can be a very interesting visual effect, but do not lend to easy legibility, so in general should be used sparingly.</td>
+<td><img src="images/style_manager8.png"></td>
+</tr>
+</table>
+<h3>Character Style</h3>
+<table width="80%">
+<tr><td valign="top">Here we see the Character Style tab in Style Manager &ndash; now we can set the various font attributes and glyph modifications. Almost all of these settings have their counterparts in the Text tab of Properties palette, so check <a href="WwText.html">Working with Text</a> for their explanation.
+<p>The exception is the far-right spinbox in the upper row of spinboxes, next to Tracking. This sets the default width of the space character or glyph (keep in mind that a space is a glyph, but in contrast, a tab is not). It does not affect the space between all glyphs, such as is done with the tracking setting.
+<p>If one is simply trying to create a character style not associated with a paragraph style, then you will only see this tab with its choices. Character styles can only be applied in the main window, i.e., there is no way to apply a character style in Story Editor &ndash; only a paragraph style with its associated character style may be used.
+<p>There is a hierarchy to text formatting styles, in that a character style will override a paragraph style, even if it is applied to an entire frame, such as one might do in <i>Select Item</i> mode. This hierarchy is also something to keep in mind if you are trying to apply a paragraph style in Story Editor and it doesn't seem to be working.
+</td>
+<td><img src="images/style_manager9.png"></td>
+</tr>
+</table>
+<h3>Importing Styles</h3>
+<table width="80%">
+<tr><td valign="top">If you click the <b>Import</b> button on the Style Manager dialog, you will then get a file dialog to select a Scribus file for style importation. While you could select any kind of file, styles will only be found in Scribus files &ndash; there will be no error message.
+<p>As seen here, you can then select which styles you wish to import, and can make sure there are no name conflicts. Renaming is an automatic process with this dialog, but of course you can rename the style once it's imported into your document.
+<p><i>Hint #1: You might consider creating some files which are empty documents, but contain a collection of styles for use in other documents.</i>
+<p><i>Hint #2 for those who like to dissect .sla files: You will also find that, for the purposes of importing a style, you can strip out everything from a file except for the following tags: the &lt;?xml...&gt;, &lt;SCRIBUSUTF8NEW...&gt;,&lt;DOCUMENT....&gt;, &lt;STYLE.....&gt; (however many), &lt;/DOCUMENT&gt;, and &lt;/SCRIBUSUTF8NEW&gt; tags, and still have something that the styles can be imported from. Do not try to load this as a document, however.</i>
+</td>
+<td><img src="images/style_manager10.png"></td>
+</tr></table>
+</body>
+</html>
/en/WwStyles.html
Property changes:
Added: svn:executable
## -0,0 +1 ##
+*
\ No newline at end of property
Index: en/images/prefs_guides1.png
===================================================================
Cannot display: file marked as a binary type.
svn:mime-type = application/octet-stream
/en/images/prefs_guides1.png
Property changes:
Added: svn:executable
## -0,0 +1 ##
+*
\ No newline at end of property
Added: svn:mime-type
## -0,0 +1 ##
+application/octet-stream
\ No newline at end of property
Index: en/images/shapes7.png
===================================================================
Cannot display: file marked as a binary type.
svn:mime-type = application/octet-stream
/en/images/shapes7.png
Property changes:
Added: svn:executable
## -0,0 +1 ##
+*
\ No newline at end of property
Added: svn:mime-type
## -0,0 +1 ##
+application/octet-stream
\ No newline at end of property
Index: en/images/text_tab10.png
===================================================================
Cannot display: file marked as a binary type.
svn:mime-type = application/octet-stream
/en/images/text_tab10.png
Property changes:
Added: svn:executable
## -0,0 +1 ##
+*
\ No newline at end of property
Added: svn:mime-type
## -0,0 +1 ##
+application/octet-stream
\ No newline at end of property
Index: en/images/prefs_general.png
===================================================================
Cannot display: file marked as a binary type.
svn:mime-type = application/octet-stream
/en/images/prefs_general.png
Property changes:
Added: svn:executable
## -0,0 +1 ##
+*
\ No newline at end of property
Added: svn:mime-type
## -0,0 +1 ##
+application/octet-stream
\ No newline at end of property
Index: en/images/prefs_document.png
===================================================================
Cannot display: file marked as a binary type.
svn:mime-type = application/octet-stream
/en/images/prefs_document.png
Property changes:
Added: svn:executable
## -0,0 +1 ##
+*
\ No newline at end of property
Added: svn:mime-type
## -0,0 +1 ##
+application/octet-stream
\ No newline at end of property
Index: en/images/prefs_gutenberg.png
===================================================================
Cannot display: file marked as a binary type.
svn:mime-type = application/octet-stream
/en/images/prefs_gutenberg.png
Property changes:
Added: svn:executable
## -0,0 +1 ##
+*
\ No newline at end of property
Added: svn:mime-type
## -0,0 +1 ##
+application/octet-stream
\ No newline at end of property
Index: en/images/combine_polygons1.png
===================================================================
Cannot display: file marked as a binary type.
svn:mime-type = application/octet-stream
/en/images/combine_polygons1.png
Property changes:
Added: svn:executable
## -0,0 +1 ##
+*
\ No newline at end of property
Added: svn:mime-type
## -0,0 +1 ##
+application/octet-stream
\ No newline at end of property
Index: en/images/combine_polygons5.png
===================================================================
Cannot display: file marked as a binary type.
svn:mime-type = application/octet-stream
/en/images/combine_polygons5.png
Property changes:
Added: svn:executable
## -0,0 +1 ##
+*
\ No newline at end of property
Added: svn:mime-type
## -0,0 +1 ##
+application/octet-stream
\ No newline at end of property
Index: en/images/style_manager10.png
===================================================================
Cannot display: file marked as a binary type.
svn:mime-type = application/octet-stream
/en/images/style_manager10.png
Property changes:
Added: svn:executable
## -0,0 +1 ##
+*
\ No newline at end of property
Added: svn:mime-type
## -0,0 +1 ##
+application/octet-stream
\ No newline at end of property
Index: en/images/prefs_tools.png
===================================================================
Cannot display: file marked as a binary type.
svn:mime-type = application/octet-stream
/en/images/prefs_tools.png
Property changes:
Added: svn:executable
## -0,0 +1 ##
+*
\ No newline at end of property
Added: svn:mime-type
## -0,0 +1 ##
+application/octet-stream
\ No newline at end of property
Index: en/images/prefs_keyboard.png
===================================================================
Cannot display: file marked as a binary type.
svn:mime-type = application/octet-stream
/en/images/prefs_keyboard.png
Property changes:
Added: svn:executable
## -0,0 +1 ##
+*
\ No newline at end of property
Added: svn:mime-type
## -0,0 +1 ##
+application/octet-stream
\ No newline at end of property
Index: en/images/prefs_magazine.png
===================================================================
Cannot display: file marked as a binary type.
svn:mime-type = application/octet-stream
/en/images/prefs_magazine.png
Property changes:
Added: svn:executable
## -0,0 +1 ##
+*
\ No newline at end of property
Added: svn:mime-type
## -0,0 +1 ##
+application/octet-stream
\ No newline at end of property
Index: en/images/prefs_tools4.png
===================================================================
Cannot display: file marked as a binary type.
svn:mime-type = application/octet-stream
/en/images/prefs_tools4.png
Property changes:
Added: svn:executable
## -0,0 +1 ##
+*
\ No newline at end of property
Added: svn:mime-type
## -0,0 +1 ##
+application/octet-stream
\ No newline at end of property
Index: en/images/text_tab1.png
===================================================================
Cannot display: file marked as a binary type.
svn:mime-type = application/octet-stream
/en/images/text_tab1.png
Property changes:
Added: svn:executable
## -0,0 +1 ##
+*
\ No newline at end of property
Added: svn:mime-type
## -0,0 +1 ##
+application/octet-stream
\ No newline at end of property
Index: en/images/line_tab1.png
===================================================================
Cannot display: file marked as a binary type.
svn:mime-type = application/octet-stream
/en/images/line_tab1.png
Property changes:
Added: svn:executable
## -0,0 +1 ##
+*
\ No newline at end of property
Added: svn:mime-type
## -0,0 +1 ##
+application/octet-stream
\ No newline at end of property
Index: en/images/boundingbox1.png
===================================================================
Cannot display: file marked as a binary type.
svn:mime-type = application/octet-stream
/en/images/boundingbox1.png
Property changes:
Added: svn:executable
## -0,0 +1 ##
+*
\ No newline at end of property
Added: svn:mime-type
## -0,0 +1 ##
+application/octet-stream
\ No newline at end of property
Index: en/images/text_tab5.png
===================================================================
Cannot display: file marked as a binary type.
svn:mime-type = application/octet-stream
/en/images/text_tab5.png
Property changes:
Added: svn:executable
## -0,0 +1 ##
+*
\ No newline at end of property
Added: svn:mime-type
## -0,0 +1 ##
+application/octet-stream
\ No newline at end of property
Index: en/images/prop_shape.png
===================================================================
Cannot display: file marked as a binary type.
svn:mime-type = application/octet-stream
/en/images/prop_shape.png
Property changes:
Added: svn:executable
## -0,0 +1 ##
+*
\ No newline at end of property
Added: svn:mime-type
## -0,0 +1 ##
+application/octet-stream
\ No newline at end of property
Index: en/images/line_tab5.png
===================================================================
Cannot display: file marked as a binary type.
svn:mime-type = application/octet-stream
/en/images/line_tab5.png
Property changes:
Added: svn:executable
## -0,0 +1 ##
+*
\ No newline at end of property
Added: svn:mime-type
## -0,0 +1 ##
+application/octet-stream
\ No newline at end of property
Index: en/images/text_tab9.png
===================================================================
Cannot display: file marked as a binary type.
svn:mime-type = application/octet-stream
/en/images/text_tab9.png
Property changes:
Added: svn:executable
## -0,0 +1 ##
+*
\ No newline at end of property
Added: svn:mime-type
## -0,0 +1 ##
+application/octet-stream
\ No newline at end of property
Index: en/images/shape_edit.png
===================================================================
Cannot display: file marked as a binary type.
svn:mime-type = application/octet-stream
/en/images/shape_edit.png
Property changes:
Added: svn:executable
## -0,0 +1 ##
+*
\ No newline at end of property
Added: svn:mime-type
## -0,0 +1 ##
+application/octet-stream
\ No newline at end of property
Index: en/images/style_manager1.png
===================================================================
Cannot display: file marked as a binary type.
svn:mime-type = application/octet-stream
/en/images/style_manager1.png
Property changes:
Added: svn:executable
## -0,0 +1 ##
+*
\ No newline at end of property
Added: svn:mime-type
## -0,0 +1 ##
+application/octet-stream
\ No newline at end of property
Index: en/images/prefs_shortwords.png
===================================================================
Cannot display: file marked as a binary type.
svn:mime-type = application/octet-stream
/en/images/prefs_shortwords.png
Property changes:
Added: svn:executable
## -0,0 +1 ##
+*
\ No newline at end of property
Added: svn:mime-type
## -0,0 +1 ##
+application/octet-stream
\ No newline at end of property
Index: en/images/prefs_exttools.png
===================================================================
Cannot display: file marked as a binary type.
svn:mime-type = application/octet-stream
/en/images/prefs_exttools.png
Property changes:
Added: svn:executable
## -0,0 +1 ##
+*
\ No newline at end of property
Added: svn:mime-type
## -0,0 +1 ##
+application/octet-stream
\ No newline at end of property
Index: en/images/style_manager9.png
===================================================================
Cannot display: file marked as a binary type.
svn:mime-type = application/octet-stream
/en/images/style_manager9.png
Property changes:
Added: svn:executable
## -0,0 +1 ##
+*
\ No newline at end of property
Added: svn:mime-type
## -0,0 +1 ##
+application/octet-stream
\ No newline at end of property
Index: en/images/prefs_document1.png
===================================================================
Cannot display: file marked as a binary type.
svn:mime-type = application/octet-stream
/en/images/prefs_document1.png
Property changes:
Added: svn:executable
## -0,0 +1 ##
+*
\ No newline at end of property
Added: svn:mime-type
## -0,0 +1 ##
+application/octet-stream
\ No newline at end of property
Index: en/images/text_tab7a.png
===================================================================
Cannot display: file marked as a binary type.
svn:mime-type = application/octet-stream
/en/images/text_tab7a.png
Property changes:
Added: svn:executable
## -0,0 +1 ##
+*
\ No newline at end of property
Added: svn:mime-type
## -0,0 +1 ##
+application/octet-stream
\ No newline at end of property
Index: en/images/combine_polygons.png
===================================================================
Cannot display: file marked as a binary type.
svn:mime-type = application/octet-stream
/en/images/combine_polygons.png
Property changes:
Added: svn:executable
## -0,0 +1 ##
+*
\ No newline at end of property
Added: svn:mime-type
## -0,0 +1 ##
+application/octet-stream
\ No newline at end of property
Index: en/images/shapes8.png
===================================================================
Cannot display: file marked as a binary type.
svn:mime-type = application/octet-stream
/en/images/shapes8.png
Property changes:
Added: svn:executable
## -0,0 +1 ##
+*
\ No newline at end of property
Added: svn:mime-type
## -0,0 +1 ##
+application/octet-stream
\ No newline at end of property
Index: en/images/text_tab11.png
===================================================================
Cannot display: file marked as a binary type.
svn:mime-type = application/octet-stream
/en/images/text_tab11.png
Property changes:
Added: svn:executable
## -0,0 +1 ##
+*
\ No newline at end of property
Added: svn:mime-type
## -0,0 +1 ##
+application/octet-stream
\ No newline at end of property
Index: en/images/style_manager3b.png
===================================================================
Cannot display: file marked as a binary type.
svn:mime-type = application/octet-stream
/en/images/style_manager3b.png
Property changes:
Added: svn:executable
## -0,0 +1 ##
+*
\ No newline at end of property
Added: svn:mime-type
## -0,0 +1 ##
+application/octet-stream
\ No newline at end of property
Index: en/images/combine_polygons2.png
===================================================================
Cannot display: file marked as a binary type.
svn:mime-type = application/octet-stream
/en/images/combine_polygons2.png
Property changes:
Added: svn:executable
## -0,0 +1 ##
+*
\ No newline at end of property
Added: svn:mime-type
## -0,0 +1 ##
+application/octet-stream
\ No newline at end of property
Index: en/images/context_shape.png
===================================================================
Cannot display: file marked as a binary type.
svn:mime-type = application/octet-stream
/en/images/context_shape.png
Property changes:
Added: svn:executable
## -0,0 +1 ##
+*
\ No newline at end of property
Added: svn:mime-type
## -0,0 +1 ##
+application/octet-stream
\ No newline at end of property
Index: en/images/text-frame-link.png
===================================================================
Cannot display: file marked as a binary type.
svn:mime-type = application/octet-stream
/en/images/text-frame-link.png
Property changes:
Added: svn:executable
## -0,0 +1 ##
+*
\ No newline at end of property
Added: svn:mime-type
## -0,0 +1 ##
+application/octet-stream
\ No newline at end of property
Index: en/images/geometry.png
===================================================================
Cannot display: file marked as a binary type.
svn:mime-type = application/octet-stream
/en/images/geometry.png
Property changes:
Added: svn:executable
## -0,0 +1 ##
+*
\ No newline at end of property
Added: svn:mime-type
## -0,0 +1 ##
+application/octet-stream
\ No newline at end of property
Index: en/images/polygons.png
===================================================================
Cannot display: file marked as a binary type.
svn:mime-type = application/octet-stream
/en/images/polygons.png
Property changes:
Added: svn:executable
## -0,0 +1 ##
+*
\ No newline at end of property
Added: svn:mime-type
## -0,0 +1 ##
+application/octet-stream
\ No newline at end of property
Index: en/images/prefs_tools1.png
===================================================================
Cannot display: file marked as a binary type.
svn:mime-type = application/octet-stream
/en/images/prefs_tools1.png
Property changes:
Added: svn:executable
## -0,0 +1 ##
+*
\ No newline at end of property
Added: svn:mime-type
## -0,0 +1 ##
+application/octet-stream
\ No newline at end of property
Index: en/images/prefs_tools5.png
===================================================================
Cannot display: file marked as a binary type.
svn:mime-type = application/octet-stream
/en/images/prefs_tools5.png
Property changes:
Added: svn:executable
## -0,0 +1 ##
+*
\ No newline at end of property
Added: svn:mime-type
## -0,0 +1 ##
+application/octet-stream
\ No newline at end of property
Index: en/images/edit_shapes.png
===================================================================
Cannot display: file marked as a binary type.
svn:mime-type = application/octet-stream
/en/images/edit_shapes.png
Property changes:
Added: svn:executable
## -0,0 +1 ##
+*
\ No newline at end of property
Added: svn:mime-type
## -0,0 +1 ##
+application/octet-stream
\ No newline at end of property
Index: en/images/XYZ_Prop.png
===================================================================
Cannot display: file marked as a binary type.
svn:mime-type = application/octet-stream
/en/images/XYZ_Prop.png
Property changes:
Added: svn:executable
## -0,0 +1 ##
+*
\ No newline at end of property
Added: svn:mime-type
## -0,0 +1 ##
+application/octet-stream
\ No newline at end of property
Index: en/images/polygons1.png
===================================================================
Cannot display: file marked as a binary type.
svn:mime-type = application/octet-stream
/en/images/polygons1.png
Property changes:
Added: svn:executable
## -0,0 +1 ##
+*
\ No newline at end of property
Added: svn:mime-type
## -0,0 +1 ##
+application/octet-stream
\ No newline at end of property
Index: en/images/text_tab2.png
===================================================================
Cannot display: file marked as a binary type.
svn:mime-type = application/octet-stream
/en/images/text_tab2.png
Property changes:
Added: svn:executable
## -0,0 +1 ##
+*
\ No newline at end of property
Added: svn:mime-type
## -0,0 +1 ##
+application/octet-stream
\ No newline at end of property
Index: en/images/squat_tux.png
===================================================================
Cannot display: file marked as a binary type.
svn:mime-type = application/octet-stream
/en/images/squat_tux.png
Property changes:
Added: svn:executable
## -0,0 +1 ##
+*
\ No newline at end of property
Added: svn:mime-type
## -0,0 +1 ##
+application/octet-stream
\ No newline at end of property
Index: en/images/line_tab2.png
===================================================================
Cannot display: file marked as a binary type.
svn:mime-type = application/octet-stream
/en/images/line_tab2.png
Property changes:
Added: svn:executable
## -0,0 +1 ##
+*
\ No newline at end of property
Added: svn:mime-type
## -0,0 +1 ##
+application/octet-stream
\ No newline at end of property
Index: en/images/text_tab6.png
===================================================================
Cannot display: file marked as a binary type.
svn:mime-type = application/octet-stream
/en/images/text_tab6.png
Property changes:
Added: svn:executable
## -0,0 +1 ##
+*
\ No newline at end of property
Added: svn:mime-type
## -0,0 +1 ##
+application/octet-stream
\ No newline at end of property
Index: en/images/line_tab6.png
===================================================================
Cannot display: file marked as a binary type.
svn:mime-type = application/octet-stream
/en/images/line_tab6.png
Property changes:
Added: svn:executable
## -0,0 +1 ##
+*
\ No newline at end of property
Added: svn:mime-type
## -0,0 +1 ##
+application/octet-stream
\ No newline at end of property
Index: en/images/XYZ_Prop1.png
===================================================================
Cannot display: file marked as a binary type.
svn:mime-type = application/octet-stream
/en/images/XYZ_Prop1.png
Property changes:
Added: svn:executable
## -0,0 +1 ##
+*
\ No newline at end of property
Added: svn:mime-type
## -0,0 +1 ##
+application/octet-stream
\ No newline at end of property
Index: en/images/geometry1.png
===================================================================
Cannot display: file marked as a binary type.
svn:mime-type = application/octet-stream
/en/images/geometry1.png
Property changes:
Added: svn:executable
## -0,0 +1 ##
+*
\ No newline at end of property
Added: svn:mime-type
## -0,0 +1 ##
+application/octet-stream
\ No newline at end of property
Index: en/images/nodes_edit.png
===================================================================
Cannot display: file marked as a binary type.
svn:mime-type = application/octet-stream
/en/images/nodes_edit.png
Property changes:
Added: svn:executable
## -0,0 +1 ##
+*
\ No newline at end of property
Added: svn:mime-type
## -0,0 +1 ##
+application/octet-stream
\ No newline at end of property
Index: en/images/text_tab7b.png
===================================================================
Cannot display: file marked as a binary type.
svn:mime-type = application/octet-stream
/en/images/text_tab7b.png
Property changes:
Added: svn:executable
## -0,0 +1 ##
+*
\ No newline at end of property
Added: svn:mime-type
## -0,0 +1 ##
+application/octet-stream
\ No newline at end of property
Index: en/images/prefs_pdfexport.png
===================================================================
Cannot display: file marked as a binary type.
svn:mime-type = application/octet-stream
/en/images/prefs_pdfexport.png
Property changes:
Added: svn:executable
## -0,0 +1 ##
+*
\ No newline at end of property
Added: svn:mime-type
## -0,0 +1 ##
+application/octet-stream
\ No newline at end of property
Index: en/images/text_tab12.png
===================================================================
Cannot display: file marked as a binary type.
svn:mime-type = application/octet-stream
/en/images/text_tab12.png
Property changes:
Added: svn:executable
## -0,0 +1 ##
+*
\ No newline at end of property
Added: svn:mime-type
## -0,0 +1 ##
+application/octet-stream
\ No newline at end of property
Index: en/images/node_edit_close.png
===================================================================
Cannot display: file marked as a binary type.
svn:mime-type = application/octet-stream
/en/images/node_edit_close.png
Property changes:
Added: svn:executable
## -0,0 +1 ##
+*
\ No newline at end of property
Added: svn:mime-type
## -0,0 +1 ##
+application/octet-stream
\ No newline at end of property
Index: en/images/combine_polygons3.png
===================================================================
Cannot display: file marked as a binary type.
svn:mime-type = application/octet-stream
/en/images/combine_polygons3.png
Property changes:
Added: svn:executable
## -0,0 +1 ##
+*
\ No newline at end of property
Added: svn:mime-type
## -0,0 +1 ##
+application/octet-stream
\ No newline at end of property
Index: en/images/prefs_pdfexport1.png
===================================================================
Cannot display: file marked as a binary type.
svn:mime-type = application/octet-stream
/en/images/prefs_pdfexport1.png
Property changes:
Added: svn:executable
## -0,0 +1 ##
+*
\ No newline at end of property
Added: svn:mime-type
## -0,0 +1 ##
+application/octet-stream
\ No newline at end of property
Index: en/images/text_linking.png
===================================================================
Cannot display: file marked as a binary type.
svn:mime-type = application/octet-stream
/en/images/text_linking.png
Property changes:
Added: svn:executable
## -0,0 +1 ##
+*
\ No newline at end of property
Added: svn:mime-type
## -0,0 +1 ##
+application/octet-stream
\ No newline at end of property
Index: en/images/round_rectangle.png
===================================================================
Cannot display: file marked as a binary type.
svn:mime-type = application/octet-stream
/en/images/round_rectangle.png
Property changes:
Added: svn:executable
## -0,0 +1 ##
+*
\ No newline at end of property
Added: svn:mime-type
## -0,0 +1 ##
+application/octet-stream
\ No newline at end of property
Index: en/images/style_manager1b.png
===================================================================
Cannot display: file marked as a binary type.
svn:mime-type = application/octet-stream
/en/images/style_manager1b.png
Property changes:
Added: svn:executable
## -0,0 +1 ##
+*
\ No newline at end of property
Added: svn:mime-type
## -0,0 +1 ##
+application/octet-stream
\ No newline at end of property
Index: en/images/prefs_guides.png
===================================================================
Cannot display: file marked as a binary type.
svn:mime-type = application/octet-stream
/en/images/prefs_guides.png
Property changes:
Added: svn:executable
## -0,0 +1 ##
+*
\ No newline at end of property
Added: svn:mime-type
## -0,0 +1 ##
+application/octet-stream
\ No newline at end of property
Index: en/images/prefs_9parts.png
===================================================================
Cannot display: file marked as a binary type.
svn:mime-type = application/octet-stream
/en/images/prefs_9parts.png
Property changes:
Added: svn:executable
## -0,0 +1 ##
+*
\ No newline at end of property
Added: svn:mime-type
## -0,0 +1 ##
+application/octet-stream
\ No newline at end of property
Index: en/images/prefs_tools2.png
===================================================================
Cannot display: file marked as a binary type.
svn:mime-type = application/octet-stream
/en/images/prefs_tools2.png
Property changes:
Added: svn:executable
## -0,0 +1 ##
+*
\ No newline at end of property
Added: svn:mime-type
## -0,0 +1 ##
+application/octet-stream
\ No newline at end of property
Index: en/images/text_filter135.png
===================================================================
Cannot display: file marked as a binary type.
svn:mime-type = application/octet-stream
/en/images/text_filter135.png
Property changes:
Added: svn:executable
## -0,0 +1 ##
+*
\ No newline at end of property
Added: svn:mime-type
## -0,0 +1 ##
+application/octet-stream
\ No newline at end of property
Index: en/images/prefs_tools6.png
===================================================================
Cannot display: file marked as a binary type.
svn:mime-type = application/octet-stream
/en/images/prefs_tools6.png
Property changes:
Added: svn:executable
## -0,0 +1 ##
+*
\ No newline at end of property
Added: svn:mime-type
## -0,0 +1 ##
+application/octet-stream
\ No newline at end of property
Index: en/images/context_image.png
===================================================================
Cannot display: file marked as a binary type.
svn:mime-type = application/octet-stream
/en/images/context_image.png
Property changes:
Added: svn:executable
## -0,0 +1 ##
+*
\ No newline at end of property
Added: svn:mime-type
## -0,0 +1 ##
+application/octet-stream
\ No newline at end of property
Index: en/images/text_tab3.png
===================================================================
Cannot display: file marked as a binary type.
svn:mime-type = application/octet-stream
/en/images/text_tab3.png
Property changes:
Added: svn:executable
## -0,0 +1 ##
+*
\ No newline at end of property
Added: svn:mime-type
## -0,0 +1 ##
+application/octet-stream
\ No newline at end of property
Index: en/images/Image_Properties.png
===================================================================
Cannot display: file marked as a binary type.
svn:mime-type = application/octet-stream
/en/images/Image_Properties.png
Property changes:
Added: svn:executable
## -0,0 +1 ##
+*
\ No newline at end of property
Added: svn:mime-type
## -0,0 +1 ##
+application/octet-stream
\ No newline at end of property
Index: en/images/line_tab3.png
===================================================================
Cannot display: file marked as a binary type.
svn:mime-type = application/octet-stream
/en/images/line_tab3.png
Property changes:
Added: svn:executable
## -0,0 +1 ##
+*
\ No newline at end of property
Added: svn:mime-type
## -0,0 +1 ##
+application/octet-stream
\ No newline at end of property
Index: en/images/text_tab7.png
===================================================================
Cannot display: file marked as a binary type.
svn:mime-type = application/octet-stream
/en/images/text_tab7.png
Property changes:
Added: svn:executable
## -0,0 +1 ##
+*
\ No newline at end of property
Added: svn:mime-type
## -0,0 +1 ##
+application/octet-stream
\ No newline at end of property
Index: en/images/line_tab7.png
===================================================================
Cannot display: file marked as a binary type.
svn:mime-type = application/octet-stream
/en/images/line_tab7.png
Property changes:
Added: svn:executable
## -0,0 +1 ##
+*
\ No newline at end of property
Added: svn:mime-type
## -0,0 +1 ##
+application/octet-stream
\ No newline at end of property
Index: en/images/style_manager7.png
===================================================================
Cannot display: file marked as a binary type.
svn:mime-type = application/octet-stream
/en/images/style_manager7.png
Property changes:
Added: svn:executable
## -0,0 +1 ##
+*
\ No newline at end of property
Added: svn:mime-type
## -0,0 +1 ##
+application/octet-stream
\ No newline at end of property
Index: en/images/frame_shape_flow.png
===================================================================
Cannot display: file marked as a binary type.
svn:mime-type = application/octet-stream
/en/images/frame_shape_flow.png
Property changes:
Added: svn:executable
## -0,0 +1 ##
+*
\ No newline at end of property
Added: svn:mime-type
## -0,0 +1 ##
+application/octet-stream
\ No newline at end of property
Index: en/images/prefs_typog.png
===================================================================
Cannot display: file marked as a binary type.
svn:mime-type = application/octet-stream
/en/images/prefs_typog.png
Property changes:
Added: svn:executable
## -0,0 +1 ##
+*
\ No newline at end of property
Added: svn:mime-type
## -0,0 +1 ##
+application/octet-stream
\ No newline at end of property
Index: en/images/prefs_display.png
===================================================================
Cannot display: file marked as a binary type.
svn:mime-type = application/octet-stream
/en/images/prefs_display.png
Property changes:
Added: svn:executable
## -0,0 +1 ##
+*
\ No newline at end of property
Added: svn:mime-type
## -0,0 +1 ##
+application/octet-stream
\ No newline at end of property
Index: en/images/text_tab11b.png
===================================================================
Cannot display: file marked as a binary type.
svn:mime-type = application/octet-stream
/en/images/text_tab11b.png
Property changes:
Added: svn:executable
## -0,0 +1 ##
+*
\ No newline at end of property
Added: svn:mime-type
## -0,0 +1 ##
+application/octet-stream
\ No newline at end of property
Index: en/images/text_tab13.png
===================================================================
Cannot display: file marked as a binary type.
svn:mime-type = application/octet-stream
/en/images/text_tab13.png
Property changes:
Added: svn:executable
## -0,0 +1 ##
+*
\ No newline at end of property
Added: svn:mime-type
## -0,0 +1 ##
+application/octet-stream
\ No newline at end of property
Index: en/images/contourline_flow.png
===================================================================
Cannot display: file marked as a binary type.
svn:mime-type = application/octet-stream
/en/images/contourline_flow.png
Property changes:
Added: svn:executable
## -0,0 +1 ##
+*
\ No newline at end of property
Added: svn:mime-type
## -0,0 +1 ##
+application/octet-stream
\ No newline at end of property
Index: en/images/combine_polygons4.png
===================================================================
Cannot display: file marked as a binary type.
svn:mime-type = application/octet-stream
/en/images/combine_polygons4.png
Property changes:
Added: svn:executable
## -0,0 +1 ##
+*
\ No newline at end of property
Added: svn:mime-type
## -0,0 +1 ##
+application/octet-stream
\ No newline at end of property
Index: en/images/prefs_colormgmt.png
===================================================================
Cannot display: file marked as a binary type.
svn:mime-type = application/octet-stream
/en/images/prefs_colormgmt.png
Property changes:
Added: svn:executable
## -0,0 +1 ##
+*
\ No newline at end of property
Added: svn:mime-type
## -0,0 +1 ##
+application/octet-stream
\ No newline at end of property
Index: en/images/skewing.png
===================================================================
Cannot display: file marked as a binary type.
svn:mime-type = application/octet-stream
/en/images/skewing.png
Property changes:
Added: svn:executable
## -0,0 +1 ##
+*
\ No newline at end of property
Added: svn:mime-type
## -0,0 +1 ##
+application/octet-stream
\ No newline at end of property
Index: en/images/text-frame-unlink.png
===================================================================
Cannot display: file marked as a binary type.
svn:mime-type = application/octet-stream
/en/images/text-frame-unlink.png
Property changes:
Added: svn:executable
## -0,0 +1 ##
+*
\ No newline at end of property
Added: svn:mime-type
## -0,0 +1 ##
+application/octet-stream
\ No newline at end of property
Index: en/images/prefs_preflight.png
===================================================================
Cannot display: file marked as a binary type.
svn:mime-type = application/octet-stream
/en/images/prefs_preflight.png
Property changes:
Added: svn:executable
## -0,0 +1 ##
+*
\ No newline at end of property
Added: svn:mime-type
## -0,0 +1 ##
+application/octet-stream
\ No newline at end of property
Index: en/images/text_filter136b.png
===================================================================
Cannot display: file marked as a binary type.
svn:mime-type = application/octet-stream
/en/images/text_filter136b.png
Property changes:
Added: svn:executable
## -0,0 +1 ##
+*
\ No newline at end of property
Added: svn:mime-type
## -0,0 +1 ##
+application/octet-stream
\ No newline at end of property
Index: en/images/prefs_goldenmean.png
===================================================================
Cannot display: file marked as a binary type.
svn:mime-type = application/octet-stream
/en/images/prefs_goldenmean.png
Property changes:
Added: svn:executable
## -0,0 +1 ##
+*
\ No newline at end of property
Added: svn:mime-type
## -0,0 +1 ##
+application/octet-stream
\ No newline at end of property
Index: en/images/text_flow.png
===================================================================
Cannot display: file marked as a binary type.
svn:mime-type = application/octet-stream
/en/images/text_flow.png
Property changes:
Added: svn:executable
## -0,0 +1 ##
+*
\ No newline at end of property
Added: svn:mime-type
## -0,0 +1 ##
+application/octet-stream
\ No newline at end of property
Index: en/images/boundingbox.png
===================================================================
Cannot display: file marked as a binary type.
svn:mime-type = application/octet-stream
/en/images/boundingbox.png
Property changes:
Added: svn:executable
## -0,0 +1 ##
+*
\ No newline at end of property
Added: svn:mime-type
## -0,0 +1 ##
+application/octet-stream
\ No newline at end of property
Index: en/images/prefs_tools3.png
===================================================================
Cannot display: file marked as a binary type.
svn:mime-type = application/octet-stream
/en/images/prefs_tools3.png
Property changes:
Added: svn:executable
## -0,0 +1 ##
+*
\ No newline at end of property
Added: svn:mime-type
## -0,0 +1 ##
+application/octet-stream
\ No newline at end of property
Index: en/images/text_filter136.png
===================================================================
Cannot display: file marked as a binary type.
svn:mime-type = application/octet-stream
/en/images/text_filter136.png
Property changes:
Added: svn:executable
## -0,0 +1 ##
+*
\ No newline at end of property
Added: svn:mime-type
## -0,0 +1 ##
+application/octet-stream
\ No newline at end of property
Index: en/images/prefs_misc.png
===================================================================
Cannot display: file marked as a binary type.
svn:mime-type = application/octet-stream
/en/images/prefs_misc.png
Property changes:
Added: svn:executable
## -0,0 +1 ##
+*
\ No newline at end of property
Added: svn:mime-type
## -0,0 +1 ##
+application/octet-stream
\ No newline at end of property
Index: en/images/text_tab4.png
===================================================================
Cannot display: file marked as a binary type.
svn:mime-type = application/octet-stream
/en/images/text_tab4.png
Property changes:
Added: svn:executable
## -0,0 +1 ##
+*
\ No newline at end of property
Added: svn:mime-type
## -0,0 +1 ##
+application/octet-stream
\ No newline at end of property
Index: en/images/line_tab4.png
===================================================================
Cannot display: file marked as a binary type.
svn:mime-type = application/octet-stream
/en/images/line_tab4.png
Property changes:
Added: svn:executable
## -0,0 +1 ##
+*
\ No newline at end of property
Added: svn:mime-type
## -0,0 +1 ##
+application/octet-stream
\ No newline at end of property
Index: en/images/text_tab8.png
===================================================================
Cannot display: file marked as a binary type.
svn:mime-type = application/octet-stream
/en/images/text_tab8.png
Property changes:
Added: svn:executable
## -0,0 +1 ##
+*
\ No newline at end of property
Added: svn:mime-type
## -0,0 +1 ##
+application/octet-stream
\ No newline at end of property
Index: en/images/prefs_fibonacci.png
===================================================================
Cannot display: file marked as a binary type.
svn:mime-type = application/octet-stream
/en/images/prefs_fibonacci.png
Property changes:
Added: svn:executable
## -0,0 +1 ##
+*
\ No newline at end of property
Added: svn:mime-type
## -0,0 +1 ##
+application/octet-stream
\ No newline at end of property
Index: en/images/line_tab.png
===================================================================
Cannot display: file marked as a binary type.
svn:mime-type = application/octet-stream
/en/images/line_tab.png
Property changes:
Added: svn:executable
## -0,0 +1 ##
+*
\ No newline at end of property
Added: svn:mime-type
## -0,0 +1 ##
+application/octet-stream
\ No newline at end of property
Index: en/images/context_text135.png
===================================================================
Cannot display: file marked as a binary type.
svn:mime-type = application/octet-stream
/en/images/context_text135.png
Property changes:
Added: svn:executable
## -0,0 +1 ##
+*
\ No newline at end of property
Added: svn:mime-type
## -0,0 +1 ##
+application/octet-stream
\ No newline at end of property
Index: en/images/style_manager8.png
===================================================================
Cannot display: file marked as a binary type.
svn:mime-type = application/octet-stream
/en/images/style_manager8.png
Property changes:
Added: svn:executable
## -0,0 +1 ##
+*
\ No newline at end of property
Added: svn:mime-type
## -0,0 +1 ##
+application/octet-stream
\ No newline at end of property
Index: en/WwImages.html
===================================================================
--- en/WwImages.html (nonexistent)
+++ en/WwImages.html (revision 15137)
@@ -0,0 +1,66 @@
+<html>
+<head>
+ <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8"/>
+ <title>Working with Images</title>
+</head>
+
+<body>
+<h2>Working with Images</h2>
+
+See <a href="WwFrames.html">Working with Frames</a> to learn about Image Frame frame creation and manipulation. Note that the image frame shows as a red border with small square handles at the corners and at the midpoints of each side. Diagonals in black are drawn to indicate that it is an image frame. Note that these small square handles disappear when the frame is locked.
+
+<p>The quickest way to load an image into the frame is to right-click on the frame, and select <b>Get Image</b> from the Context menu. Pressing Ctrl+D or menu <i>File > Import > Get Image</i> will also work. A file dialog will appear, showing the image types that Scribus can import, which include bitmap formats TIFF, PNG, JPG and GIF as well as vector format PS (PostScript) and PDF files, which will be converted to bitmaps. Note that after import the image may only partly show. We'll see below in <i>Properties: Image</i> how to adjust scaling and positioning of the image in the frame.
+<p><i>Descriptions, advantages and disadvantages of various file formats will be discussed elsewhere.</i>
+
+
+
+<h3>The Context Menu</h3>
+<table cellpadding=3><tr>
+<td>Right-click on the empty frame to show its context menu as seen to the right. An empty frame will not show all these choices.
+<ul>
+<li><b>Info</b> gives a short list of information about the image, its name, the PPI (pixels per inch) of the original and as shown in Scribus, its colorspace, and whether it is set to print (and export to PDF).</li>
+<li><b>Undo</b> will undo the last operation, which should be indicated. If applicable, there will also be a <b>Redo</b> item.</li>
+<li><b>Get Image</b> allows for importing an image, as indicated above.</li>
+<li><b>Adjust Frame to Image</b> enlarges or shrinks the width and height of your frame to fit the image at its current resolution.</li>
+<li><b>Adjust Image to Frame</b> adjusts the image to the frame. Image will remain proportional if this is checked in Image tab of Properties.</li>
+<li><b>Update Image</b> reloads the image. Would be used if you have edited the source file. See Edit Image below.</li>
+<li><b>Preview Settings</b> This allows to image to be visible or not, and if visible, the resolution can be selected. Lower resolution or not showing images will speed up screen refreshes if this is sluggish. <b>Full Resolution</b> can only be as high as your monitor supports. These settings do not affect printing your image or exporting to PDF.</li>
+<li><b>Image Effects</b> (also Ctrl + E) provide for a number of editing types, like blurring or changing contrast and brightness. These edits happen in a nondestructive way, i.e., the source file is not altered.</li>
+<li><b>Edit Image</b> starts your image editor as set in the File->Preferences->External Tools and loads the image.</li>
+<li><b>Attributes</b> will not be discussed here.
+<li><b>Is Locked</b> locks the frame's position, size, and content.
+<li><b>Size is Locked</b> locks only the size. Frame and image can otherwise be moved and edited.</li>
+<li><b>Send to Scrapbook</b> and <b>Send to Patterns</b> will not be covered here, except to say that these allow for saving content to be shared among documents.</li>
+<li><b>Level</b> allows you to move the frame up or down levels on the current layer. If your document has more than one layer, there will also be an item <b>Send to Layer</b> to allow moving the frame to a different layer.</li>
+<li><b>Convert to</b> gives you the following sub-choices:
+<ul><li><b>Polygon</b>, converts to a polygon, with apparent loss of your image, recoverable with Convert to Image Frame.</li>
+<li><b>Text Frame</b> converts to that kind of frame, in which case your image becomes invisible, but will be restored if you convert back to an image frame. You cannot show text and an image together, except where text is incorporated in an image. Use a superimposed text frame to apply text over an image.</li>
+</ul>
+<li><b>Cut</b>, <b>Copy</b>, and <b>Delete</b> are covered in Working with Frames.</li>
+<li><b>Contents > Clear</b> is only present when your frame has content, and you will get a dialog to Ok the operation. There is also a choice <b>Contents > Copy</b> to copy only the content of the frame, as opposed to copying the frame <i>and</i> its contents.</li>
+<li><b>Properties</b> brings up or hides the Properties palette</li>
+</ul>
+</td>
+<td><img src="images/context_image.png" ALT="Image Context Menu" ALIGN=right></td>
+</tr>
+</table>
+<h3>Properties: Image</h3>
+<table cellpadding=3><tr>
+<td>When an Image is first loaded, the default is for it to have Free Scaling, and will be imported at its "native" size, at 72 DPI (your monitor's resolution).
+
+<p>Under Free Scaling the spinboxes are:
+<ul>
+<li><b>X-Pos</b> and <b>Y-Pos</b> - Relative position of the left upper corner of the image to the left upper corner of the frame.</li>
+<li><b>X-Scale</b> and <b>Y-Scale</b> - Magnification of the image, compared to when it is at 72 DPI.</li>
+<li><b>Actual X-DPI</b> and <b>Actual Y-DPI</b> - These of course are inversely related to magnification. Your monitor will still likely be showing the image at no better than 72 PPI, but this refers to the final resolution to be exported to the PDF.</li>
+</ul>
+<p>In many cases, we may have a more or less set frame size we wish to squeeze an entire image into, in which case choosing <b>Scale to Frame Size</b> (or <b>Adjust Image to Frame</b> from the Context menu) makes sense. Without checking <b>Proportional</b>, the image is simply stretched to fit the frame and may be quite distorted. You should find the combination of scaling to frame size (proportional) and then <b>Adjust Frame to Image</b> from the Context menu very useful for making a frame exactly the right size for your image.
+<p><b>Image Effects</b> will be discussed elsewhere.</td>
+<td><img src="images/Image_Properties.png" ALT="Properties: Image"></td>
+</tr>
+</table>
+<h3>Edit Contents Mode</h3>
+Enter Edit Contents mode by clicking the icon on the toolbar, or pressing <b>E</b> from the keyboard. Go back to Select Item mode by pressing <b>Esc</b>, or clicking outside, then inside the frame. You will need to have checked <b>Free Scaling</b> in order for this to be operational.
+<p>With image frames, Edit Contents mode allows you to click-drag with the mouse to shift the image relative to the frame, i.e., the same as adjusting the X-Pos and Y-Pos in the Image tab.
+</body>
+</html>
/en/WwImages.html
Property changes:
Added: svn:executable
## -0,0 +1 ##
+*
\ No newline at end of property
Index: en/menu.xml
===================================================================
--- en/menu.xml (revision 15136)
+++ en/menu.xml (revision 15137)
@@ -39,6 +39,14 @@
<submenuitem text="Scribus Basics" file="about2.html" >
<submenuitem file="qsg.html" text="Quick Start Guide" />
<submenuitem file="docinfo.html" text="Document Information" />
+ <submenuitem file="WwFrames.html" text="Working with Frames" />
+ <submenuitem file="WwText.html" text="Working with Text" />
+ <submenuitem file="WwStyles.html" text="Working with Styles" />
+ <submenuitem file="WwImages.html" text="Working with Images" />
+ <submenuitem file="WwRenderframes.html" text="Working with Render Frames" />
+ <submenuitem file="WwShapes.html" text="Working with Shapes" />
+ <submenuitem file="WwLines.html" text="Working with Lines and Line Styles" />
+ <submenuitem file="EditingShapes.html" text="Editing Shapes" />
<submenuitem text="Master Pages" file="pagetemplate1.html" />
<submenuitem text="Page Numbering" file="pagenumber.html" />
<submenuitem text="Short Words Plug-in" file="short-words.html" />
@@ -52,7 +60,6 @@
<submenuitem file="importhints4.html" text="HTML Importing" />
<submenuitem file="scribus-svg.html" text="Importing SVGs" />
<submenuitem file="psd.html" text="Importing PSD" />
- <submenuitem file="renderframes.html" text="Render Frames" />
</submenuitem>
<submenuitem text="Exporting to PDF" file="pdfexport1.html">
<submenuitem text="Export Workflow" file="pdfexport2.html"/>
Index: en/WwText.html
===================================================================
--- en/WwText.html (nonexistent)
+++ en/WwText.html (revision 15137)
@@ -0,0 +1,178 @@
+<html>
+<head>
+ <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8"/>
+ <title>Working with Text</title>
+</head>
+<body>
+<h2>Working with Text</h2>
+Unlike using a wordprocessor, Scribus uses a frames environment. Therefore, you cannot simply enter text on a document page. See <a href="WwFrames.html">Working with Frames</a> to learn about frame creation and manipulation. Once you have a text frame, your task now is to put some text into it.
+<p>You may place text into a text frame in the following ways:
+<ul>
+<li>Using Story Editor.</li>
+<li>Directly into the frame on the main screen.</li>
+<li>Importing text from a plain text file.</li>
+<li>Importing from selected formatted files, such as ODT, HTML, CSV. There are other file formats such as DOC files which can import only the text without any formatting.</li>
+<li>You can also set up custom tags in text files to act as a filter for formatting on import.</li>
+</ul>
+<h3>Using Story Editor</h3>
+This is listed first because it is the recommended way to enter text manually from the keyboard. Bring up the Story Editor (SE) from the Context menu or with Ctrl+T. Because SE is very versatile, it will be covered in detail in its own section. Its main disadvantage is that you will not see the final appearance of the text until you update the frame, with or without exiting SE. SE is also a convenient way to create, edit, and apply Paragraph and Character Styles.
+<h3>On the Main Screen</h3>
+A selected frame can enter Edit Contents mode by clicking the Edit Contents icon on the toolbar or double-clicking on the frame (keyboard: E). The advantage of this is that you can see immediately the appearance of your additions or edits. It is a bit slower, since screen refreshes are involved. You can use Properties to change the font, style, and other characteristics such as linespacing. For small edits and frames which only contain a small amount of text, Edit Contents can serve your needs well.
+<h3>Inline Graphics</h3>
+You may also insert any graphics in a line of text. Simply copy the item (Ctrl+C, for example), then paste into the line of text while in Edit Contents mode. This will not work in Story Editor.
+<h3>Importing Text From a File</h3>
+We'll collapse our above list a bit, so that we consider all these unformatted, formatted, and tagged files close together.
+<h3>Plain Text</h3>
+Clicking <b>Get Text</b> will bring up a file dialog and by default look for files ending in .csv, .html, .htm, .odt, .pdb, .sxw, and .txt, so if you save a plain text file, try to save as *.txt. You can also import .doc files in Linux if you have installed antiword &ndash; on Windows versions of Scribus this is already present. If the frame has content that you want to add to, use <b>Append Text</b> instead. While appending text works in both Select Item and Edit Contents modes, they both will append text at the end.
+<p>If you really do want to insert a file somewhere in the middle, append, then select the text in Edit Contents mode, cut, then paste at the point you wish it to go, while in Edit Contents mode or in Story Editor.
+<p>Plain text into an empty frame will use the default font settings for your text frames, which you can change in <i>File > Preferences > Tools</i>.
+<h3>CSV, HTML, and ODT files</h3>
+<ul>
+<li>CSV files (comma-separated values) are typically generated by spreadsheet or database programs, but they are simple enough that they could be created with a text editor. The data will be arranged so that a comma or some other character tells Scribus when the next field is coming, and a newline tells when the next row comes in the file. On importation, you have an opportunity to declare the separator, and also declare a <i>value separator</i>, typically quotation marks. The value separator is optional, and would be used to allow the inclusion of a comma inside the field. If you check that the first row is a header, those values will be made bold. When Scribus pulls in the data, it will use tabs between the fields. For the header row, these will be center-type and for the rest left-type.</li>
+<li>Considering the wide variety of HTML tags, it shouldn't be surprising that there are limitations to what Scribus can interpret from an HTML file. It will interpret text only between the &lt;body&gt; and &lt;/body&gt; tags and mainly focus on recognizing headers, paragraph and line breaks, and text styles, though the styles available may depend on the fonts on the system. You can expect at least some extraneous text in a complex HTML file. Scribus will assign styles to variously formatted text.</li>
+<li>ODT files (from OpenOffice.org) are the recommended format when you want to automatically assign Scribus styles to text you import into a frame. Generally a very good to excellent result can be expected for recognizing and assigning styles, provided that you use styles in oowriter. This can also be a workaround for DOC or other files, by importing into oowriter and then saving as an ODT file. You cannot expect good results importing tables in this fashion, even in an ODT file.</li>
+</ul>
+<h3>Tagged Files</h3>
+<table cellpadding=3><tr>
+<td>The idea of putting some kind of text indicator, or tag, at intervals in a text file in order to trigger some action when the file is read is elegant and has survived since the early days of computing. The purpose in Scribus would be to automatically cause the application of some edit to the text, most commonly a paragraph style. These tags can be anything you want, but should be a combination of easy to type, easy to find visually as you scan the file, and unique. This is why the suggestions you see on the wiki and the printed manual use 2-3 letter combinations, beginning with a backslash (\).
+<p>On the textfile end of things you want to put these tags, let's say \h1 and \h2, at the beginning of a paragraph which is to receive some style. Once you have saved the file, you then import it, initially no different than a plain text file, by using <b>Get Text</b>. You likely did not see it, but please now note the button labeled <b>Automatic</b> in the dialog. Clicking this shows a drop-down list, where you can find <b>Text Filters</b> as a choice.
+</td>
+<td rowspan=2><img src="images/text_filter136.png" ALT="Automatic text filtering 2"></td>
+</tr>
+<tr><td><img src="images/text_filter135.png" ALT="Automatic text filtering" ALIGN="center">
+</td></tr>
+<tr><td>On choosing Text Filters, and then selecting your file and pressing Ok, you now have a bit of work to do, since unless you have already created the specific actions based on your tags, you must do so now. For each tag you have a choice of <b>Remove</b>, <b>Replace</b>, or <b>Apply</b> as the action, and of course here we want to apply a style, but as you can imagine, we might also use this to remove or replace some text on import without altering the file itself.
+<p>In this small example, we have set up a filter that we have named <b>thesis</b> by choosing to <b>Apply</b> a <b>paragraph style</b>, named <b>header1</b> for <b>paragraphs starting with</b> our tag, <b>\h1</b>, and we will <b>remove match</b> (the \h1). Had we previously set up thesis, it could be chosen from the drop-down button in the upper right corner of the dialog. Similarly, if we have already created these styles, they could be chosen from a list where you see header1 and header2. We could delete an action by clicking on the <b>'&ndash;'</b> button, and add another with the <b>'+'</b> button.
+</td>
+<td><img src="images/text_filter136b.png" ALT="Automatic text filtering 3"></td></tr>
+</table>
+<h3>Context Menu</h3>
+<table cellpadding=3><tr>
+<td>Right-click on a frame to show its context menu, seen to the right. We will not cover all the features of the text frame context menu, but here is the particular list of choices available for text frames.
+<ul>
+<li>At the top, <b>Info</b> gives information about the content of the frame, statistics on number of paragraphs, lines, and so forth, and also whether this frame is set to print, which also applies to whether it will be included in PDF export.</li>
+<li><b>Undo</b> will undo the last operation on the frame, but it's important to mention that this does not include text editing, which is currently not Undo-able. <b>Redo</b> is available when some operation has been undone.</li>
+<li><b>Get Text</b> and <b>Append Text</b> allow for importation of text data from a file.</li>
+<li><b>Edit Text</b> brings up the Story Editor</b>
+<li><b>Sample Text</b> allows for importing so-called <i>Lorem ipsum</i> text, not only in the original Latin, but also many other languages. A dialog comes up for choice of the language and amount of sample text to create.</li>
+<li><b>Attributes</b> and <b>PDF Options</b> are advanced features not covered here.</li>
+<li><b>Is Locked</b> will lock all characteristics of a frame, such as position, size, and contents. It cannot be deleted, but can be copied and pasted, and the copy will also be locked. If you Duplicate a locked frame, the duplication will not be locked.</li>
+<li><b>Size is Locked</b>, as the name suggests, only locks the size of the frame.</li>
+<li><b>Send to Scrapbook</b> and <b>Send to Patterns</b> will not be covered here, except to say that this allows for saving content to be shared among documents.</li>
+<li><b>Level</b> allows you to move the frame up or down levels on the current layer. If your document has more than one layer, there will also be an item <b>Send to Layer</b> to allow moving the frame to a different layer.</li>
+<li><b>Convert to</b> gives you the following sub-choices:
+<ul><li><b>Image Frame</b> converts to that kind of frame, in which case your text becomes invisible, but will be restored if you convert back to a text frame. You cannot show text and an image together, except where text is incorporated in an image. Use a superimposed text frame to apply text over an image.</li>
+<li><b>Outlines</b> transforms the glyphs (characters) into vector graphics, which are then grouped. <i>Some caution is advised here, since even though there seems to be an option to convert back to a text frame, this will not allow editing of the text. Best to Undo back to before the text to outlines conversion, but you must do this with the toolbar Undo or Ctrl+Z.</i></li>
+<li><b>Polygon</b>, like Image Frame, converts to a polygon, with apparent loss of text, recoverable with Convert to Text Frame.</li>
+</ul>
+<li><b>Cut</b>, <b>Copy</b>, and <b>Delete</b> are covered in Working with Frames.</li>
+<li><b>Contents > Clear</b> is only present when your frame has content, and you will get a dialog to Ok the operation.</li>
+<li><b>Properties</b> brings up or hides the Properties palette</li>
+</ul>
+</td>
+<td><img src="images/context_text135.png" ALT="Text frame Context menu"></td>
+</tr>
+</table>
+<h3>Linking Text Frames</h3>
+<table cellpadding=3><tr>
+<td>Any multipage document is likely to need to link text from one page to the next. An automatic way of setting this up is when a new document is created. This graphic is from the lower right corner of the <b>New Document</b> dialog. We have set the <b>Options</b> for 4 pages initially, with 2-column frames (which will fill to the margins), and an 11-point gap between columns. <i>Show Document Settings After Creation</i> will bring up the <i>Document Settings</i> dialog after <b>OK</b> is clicked.
+<p>You may freely edit the individual frames on pages afterward without losing your text linkage. Furthermore, if you add more pages to your document, they will also have these same linked frames. If you unlink somewhere in the middle, you will need to re-establish your linking pattern.</td>
+<td><img src="images/text_linking.png" ALT="Options in New Document Dialog"></td>
+</table>
+<h3>Linking Existing Text Frames</h3>
+<p><img src="images/text-frame-link.png" ALIGN-left>
+A selected but unlinked text frame will show the toolbar icon to the left (green arrow) active. Click the link icon, then click the next frame that your selected frame is to link to. If you have more frames you wish to link to, continue clicking on them in order. <i>When your linking is finished, remember to click the link icon to deactivate it.</i>
+<p><img src="images/text-frame-unlink.png" ALIGN-left>
+Unlinking is a similar process. The icon will only be active if you have selected a linked frame. Select the frame where you want the linking to stop, click the unlink icon, then click the next frame in the linkage. <i>You will need to re-establish a linking pattern if you simply want to skip over a particular frame.</i>
+<br clear=all>
+<h3>Properties: Text</h3>
+<table cellpadding=3><tr>
+<td><img src="images/text_tab1.png" ALT="Properties: Text tab" ALIGN="right"></td>
+<td><p>Due to the addition of new capabilities in versions 1.3.5+, and redesign of the Properties palette, the Text tab has become quite complex. The basic view seems simpler, but now we have a series of sub-tabs to choose from. At the top of the tab, there is a button for the font family, and then just below it the fontface in that family. Next we come to the spinbox for text size, and just below that a drop-down selector for linespacing, with 3 choices: <b>Fixed</b>, <b>Automatic</b>, and <b>Align to Baseline Grid</b>. Fixed linespacing allows you to set the space between lines of text using the spinbox to the right. Automatic spacing causes Scribus to adjust for you, according to the font size. The default setting for this is 120% of the font size, but this can be adjusted in <i>File > Preferences > Typography</i>. Finally, the row of buttons at the bottom sets justification &ndash; left, center, right, full, and forced full.
+<p>At this point it should be mentioned that when you are in Select Item mode, any changes will apply to the entire frame contents. In Edit Contents mode, things are a bit more complex.
+<ul>
+<li>If your cursor is at some particular position, changes in font, fontface, and size apply to the single glyph to the right of the cursor.</li>
+<li>If your cursor is highlighting a block of text, changes in font, fontface, and size apply to the highlighted glyphs.</li>
+<li>Changes in linespacing and justification apply to the paragraph in which the cursor is located or in the paragraph(s) where words are highlighted. <i>Note that with automatic linespacing, this is adjusted line-by-line in situations where font size varies from word-to-word or letter-by-letter in the same paragraph. In most cases, you will find that fixed linespacing produces a more attractive result when font size is variable within a paragraph.</i></li>
+</ul>
+</td></tr>
+</table>
+<h3><a name="10">What About the Baseline Grid?</a></h3>
+<table cellpadding=3 width="80%"><tr>
+<td>The baseline grid is always present but hidden by default, and is never seen in printed output or in your PDF. Click <i>View > Show Baseline Grid</i> to see it. Its default setting is 14.40 points, and the default is adjustable in <i>File > Preferences > Guides</i>, where you will see that the <b>Offset</b> is also adjustable &ndash; this is the displacement of glyphs from the baseline, and can have a positive or negative value.
+<p>To the right we see text aligned to the baseline grid for the entire frame, along with an illustration of localized adjustments in Edit Contents mode. The Offset here is 0. As you can see, this is also a method for keeping linespacing constant when font size varies in a paragraph, since aligning to the baseline grid is just another kind of fixed linespacing. The other common use for aligning to baseline grid is to make sure that lines of text match their spacing in adjacent frames or columns.</td>
+<td><img src="images/text_tab2.png" ALT="Baseline Grid" ALIGN="right"></td></tr>
+</table>
+
+<h3>Color & Effects</h3>
+<table cellpadding=3><tr>
+<td>Here we choose the colors for text. The fill color for a font is the main color. The line color only is active when outline or shadow effects are activated, and there is only one color applied to both effects.
+<p>From left to right, the effects buttons are as follows:
+<ol>
+<li>Underline sections of text, including intervening spaces. Hold down the button to make adjustments of <b>Displacement</b> and <b>Linewidth</b>. Defaults are in <i>File > Preferences > Typography</i>.</li>
+<li>Underline words only, not intervening spaces. Hold down the button to make adjustments of <b>Displacement</b> and <b>Linewidth</b>. Defaults are in <i>File > Preferences > Typography</i>.</li>
+<li>Subscript. Relative size (<<b>Scaling</b>) and <b>Displacement</b> are set in <i>File > Preferences > Typography</i>.</li>
+<li>Superscript. Defaults are in <i>File > Preferences > Typography</i>.</li>
+<li>All caps.</li>
+<li>Small caps. There are a few fonts that have a real small caps subset, but this is a workaround for those that do not.</li>
+<li>Strikethrough. Hold down the button to make adjustments of <b>Displacement</b> and <b>Linewidth</b>. Defaults are in <i>File > Preferences > Typography</i>.</li>
+<li>Outline. Hold down the button to adjust <b>Stroke width</b>.</li>
+<li>Shadow. Hold down the button to adjust the <b>X- and Y-Offsets</b>.</li>
+<li>Right to Left Writing. Glyphs are flipped horizontally and run from right to left. Only available on a frame-wide basis, i.e., not by glyph/word/paragraph.</li>
+</ol>
+</td>
+<td valign=middle><img src="images/text_tab3.png" ALT="Color & Effects"></td>
+</tr>
+</table>
+<table cellpadding=3><tr>
+<td align=center><img src="images/text_tab4.png" ALT="Reverse a word workaround" ALIGN="left"></td>
+<td>To the left is a workaround for the apparent inability to reverse only an individual word using inline graphics. A small text frame was made with our word to be reversed, then converted to outlines. The group of outlines was then flipped, copied, then inserted inline (as in inline graphics) into our sample text.</td>
+</tr>
+</table>
+<h3>Style Settings</h3>
+Here in the Properties palette, we can only set an already created style. An explanation on creating and editing styles is found in <a href="WwStyles.html">Working with Styles</a>.
+<h3>First Line Offset</h3>
+<table cellpadding=3>
+<tr><td>First line offset refers to how closely the first line of text approaches the top of the frame or the space it is allowed. In this example, where we have set a top distance, we see from left to right, <b>Maximum Ascent</b>, <b>Font Ascent</b>, and <b>Line Spacing</b> offsets.
+</td></tr>
+<tr>
+<td><img src="images/text_tab7a.png" ALT="First Line Offset"></td></tr>
+</table>
+<h3>Columns and Text Distances</h3>
+<table cellpadding=3 width="60%"><tr>
+<td><img src="images/text_tab6.png" width=200 height=200 ALT="Columns and Text Distances" ALIGN="left"></td>
+<td>Formerly, this was in the Shape tab, but now has sensibly moved to Text, since it does apply to text frames. Another enhancement is that now we can see in this example that two <b>Columns</b>, a <b>Gap</b>, and <b>Top</b> and <b>Left</b> distances have been set, even in an empty frame. This feature can be turned off/on with <i>View > Show Text Frame Columns</i>.</td></tr>
+</table>
+<h3>Tabulators</h3>
+<table cellpadding=3><tr>
+<td>Tabulators will also be covered in Working with Styles, but here we can create and apply frame-wide tab stops. Operationally this is quite easy. Simply click somewhere along the ruler, and a <b>Left</b> tab is created. Adjust <b>Position</b> manually or with the spinbox. If desired you can change the tab type to <b>Right</b>, <b>Period</b>, <b>Comma</b>, or <b>Center</b>. To delete an individual tab, click-drag it off the ruler.
+<p>The space between stops (<b>Fill Char</b>) will by default be white space (<b>None</b>), or can be <b>Dot</b>, <b>Hyphen</b>, <b>Underscore</b> or a <b>Custom</b> character of your choice.
+<p>Tab Types
+<ul>
+<li>Left - entered text goes to the right of the stop.</li>
+<li>Right - entered text goes to the left until Tab is pressed again.</li>
+<li>Period - entered text or numbers center on a period/decimal point, ending when Tab is pressed again.</li>
+<li>Comma - entered text or numbers center on a comma/decimal separator, ending when Tab is pressed again.</li>
+<li>Center - entered text centers on the middle of a string, ending when Tab is pressed again.</li>
+</ul>
+</td>
+<td valign="middle"><img src="images/text_tab10.png" ALT="Tabulators" ALIGN="right"></td></tr>
+</table>
+<h3>Optical Margins</h3>
+<table cellpadding=3 width="75%"><tr>
+<td>When there is punctuation ending or beginning a line, the adjacent characters will be pushed in a bit resulting in a slightly ragged edge to the text. Application of optical margins allows the punctuation to extend from the frame just a bit so that the edges of other characters line up more closely.
+<p>In the image to the right, on the left side we see the edge with no optical margins applied, and the right side shows what we see with optical margins.</td>
+<td><img src="images/text_tab11b.png" ALT="Optical Margins" ALIGN="right"></td></tr>
+</table>
+<h3>Advanced Settings</h3>
+<table cellpadding=3 width="80%">
+<tr><td>The upper part of this sub-tab contains some features long present in Scribus, but have simply moved here. Starting from the upper left spinbox and going clockwise, we have an adjustment to baseline, and not just for align to baseline grid, so that selected words can be shifted above or below the baseline for the desired effect.
+<p>Next we have kerning, in which the spaces between glyphs can be adjusted, again in a smaller than normal (negative percent) or larger fashion.
+<p>In the lower right corner we can stretch or shrink glyphs vertically, and in the lower left shrink or stretch horizontally.</td>
+<td><img src="images/text_tab13.png" ALT="Advanced Settings" ALIGN="right"></td>
+</tr>
+</table>
+<h3>Word Tracking and Glyph Extension</h3>
+You might consider these a more advanced or intelligent kerning and character width adjustment, where we can, by setting the Minimum and Normal, or Minimum and Maximum parameters, allow for adjustments in spacing in a selective fashion, yet frame-wide. As you adjust these, you will see only some words, some lines adjusting. The idea is to adjust for more pleasing, even layout of the words in the frame, trying to avoid or eliminate problems like white space rivers.
+</body>
+</html>
/en/WwText.html
Property changes:
Added: svn:executable
## -0,0 +1 ##
+*
\ No newline at end of property
Index: en/WwFrames.html
===================================================================
--- en/WwFrames.html (nonexistent)
+++ en/WwFrames.html (revision 15137)
@@ -0,0 +1,113 @@
+<html>
+<head>
+ <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8"/>
+ <title>Working with Frames</title>
+</head>
+<body>
+<h2>Working with Frames</h2>
+<p>Working with Scribus is for the most part working with a frames environment. Some more generic terms you may see in menus and commands are objects or items, of which frames are one kind of object or item. There are 5 kinds of frames you will work with in Scribus:
+<ul>
+<li><a href="WwText.html">Text frames</a></li>
+<li><a href="WwImages.html">Image frames</a></li>
+<li>Render frames</li>
+<li><a href="WwShapes.html">Shapes</a></li>
+<li><a href="WwShapes.html">Polygons</a></li>
+</ul>
+Each of these have their own section in this online manual, but here we will explain features they share.
+<h3>Creating Frames</h3>
+There are at least 6 ways to create frames:
+<ol>
+<li>Clicking the toolbar icon for the type of frame</li>
+<li>Choosing from the menu, Item > <i>Type of frame</i></li>
+<li>Using the keyboard shortcut (when not in Edit Contents mode)</li>
+<ul>
+<li>T for Text frame</li>
+<li>I for Image frame</li>
+<li>D for Render frame</li>
+<li>S for Shape</li>
+<li>P for Polygon</li>
+</ul>
+<li>Using Duplicate or Multiple Duplicate to make one or more copies of the selected frame</li>
+<li>Duplicating a Layer with its contents</li>
+<li>Copying a page, with all of its contents</li>
+</ol>
+<table width="70%" cellpadding="5">
+<tr><td valign="top">If you change your mind or press the wrong key, you can press Esc or the Spacebar to cancel, or click the toolbar icon for your next choice.
+<p>When you make one of the choices 1-3, your mouse cursor becomes activated to draw the frame, and a tooltip pops up to tell you the cursor's X-Pos and Y-Pos. As you click-drag to make the frame from one corner to its opposite, the tooltip now displays the Width and Height frame you are creating. For Shapes and Polygons, this describes the dimensions of the Bounding Box.
+<p>Usually the next step is adding or doing something with the content, but we will leave that to the individual sections regarding each type of frame.</td>
+<td width="310"><img src="images/shapes7.png">
+<p>Here we see the <b>Enter Object Size</b> dialog that comes up if you left-click somewhere on the page, rather than doing a click-drag operation. Obviously this can be very handy for creating a frame of a precise size and repeatedly doing so.
+</td></tr>
+</table>
+<h3>Context Menus</h3>
+Each frame type has its own particular Context Menu, found by right-clicking on it. Since these are variable depending on the type of frame, they will not be elaborated upon here. Keep in mind that you can find interesting things in Scribus by right-clicking on various items.
+<h3>Manipulating Frames</h3>
+<h4>How to Use Spinboxes</h4>
+<table>
+<tr><td>
+<ul>
+<li>Hover the cursor over the spinbox value and use your mousewheel to change it</li>
+<li>Click the up or down arrow to the right side of the spinbox</li>
+<li>Use the arrow keys &ndash; cursor must be over the appropriate spinbox</li>
+<li>Change the value with the keyboard. <br><i>Hint: Scribus will do math for you. Enter (615/2+20), for example. There are some keywords you can use also, and combine with math operations: <b>pagewidth</b>/2, for example. Other keywords are <b>pageheight</b>, <b>width</b> (of selected item), and <b>height</b> (of selected item).</i>
+</ul>
+The mousewheel digit changed can be modified:
+<ul>
+<li>No key pressed: units</li>
+<li>Shift key held: tenths</li>
+<li>Shift + Alt: hundredths</li>
+<li>Ctrl or Alt: tens</li>
+<li>Ctrl + Alt: hundreds &ndash; <i>Careful with this one with a page measurement unit like inches</i></li>
+<li>Except for those that use Alt, you can use most of these keymods when moving the frame with the arrow keys (cursor not over spinbox), but not for resizing with arrow keys.</li>
+</ul>
+<h4>Moving Frames</h4>
+<p>The simplest method is to click-hold inside the frame and move with the mouse. While this is taking place a tooltip tells you the position of the <b>Basepoint</b> (default basepoint is left upper corner). You can also use the arrow keys to move the frame as long as the cursor is not over any spinboxes. For more precise movement, use Properties > X,Y,Z tab (<b>X-Pos</b> and <b>Y-Pos</b>) and its spinboxes.
+<h4>Resizing Frames</h4>
+A selected frame shows a dotted red border and in addition small square handles at the corners and at the midpoints of each side. Click and drag a handle to make manual adjustments. If you hold down the Alt key <i>and the cursor is not over a spinbox</i>, you can resize the frame using the arrow keys. Use the <b>Width</b> and <b>Height</b> spinboxes for precision.
+</td>
+<td valign="middle"><img src="images/XYZ_Prop.png"></td></tr>
+</table>
+<h4>Rotating Frames</h4>
+There are 2 ways to rotate a frame:
+<ul>
+<li>Click the Rotate icon on the toolbar. You then click-drag inside the frame to rotate. The basepoint is always the center of the frame.</li>
+<li>Use the <b>Rotation</b> spinbox in Properties. In this case, you can choose the <b>Basepoint</b> around which rotation takes place, as well as have more precision.</li>
+</ul>
+<table>
+<tr><td><h4>Moving Frames &ndash; Level to Level or Layer to Layer</h4>
+You can move up or down levels using Properties > X,Y,Z tab, in the area labelled <b>Level</b>, either one level at a time or to the top or bottom. The number beside these arrows tells you which level your object is on (1 is the bottom).
+<p>There are also keyboard shortcuts:
+<ul>
+<li>Home: to the top</li>
+<li>End: to the bottom</li>
+<li>Ctrl+Home: up one level</li>
+<li>Ctrl+End: down one level</li>
+</ul>
+If you have more than one layer, you can use the Context menu (right-click on the frame) to send the frame to a different layer.
+<h4>Final Section of Properties: X,Y,Z</h4>
+Looking at the last group of 7 buttons in the lower right corner of <b>X,Y,Z</b>, the two leftmost buttons, grayed out in this picture, will group and ungroup a collection of selected objects. The next two buttons, with the blue arrows, flip the object horizontally or vertically. The picture of the lock is where you can lock or unlock the selected object, and just to its right you can lock or unlock only the size of the object. The last button in the lower right corner enables is disables printing (and export to PDF) of the object.
+</td>
+<td valign="middle"><img src="images/XYZ_Prop1.png"></td></tr>
+</table>
+<h4>Copy, Cut, Paste, Delete</h4>
+Most users should be familiar with these kinds of operations common to many types of editing software. They can be found in the Context Menu, and have the standard keyboard shortcuts of Ctrl+C, Ctrl+X, Ctrl+V, and Del. In Scribus, Delete operates like Cut, since it can be undone, but in contrast is not copied to the clipboard and therefore cannot be pasted. If you move from one page or one layer to another, Paste will place the new copy at the same coordinates it had on the original page or layer.
+<h4>Selecting Multiple Frames</h4>
+You might do this as a prelude to grouping the frames, so you can move or scale them as a unit.
+<p>The simplest way of selecting a group of frames is to click-drag <i>around</i> them. You have to be sure that any frame you wish to be selected is fully within the temporary rectangle you see during this operation. This may not work when you only want some of the frames in a particular rectangular space. In that situation you can manually select additional frames in a cumulative way by holding down Shift as you click. If you make a mistake, click again while holding Shift to deselect individual frames (this is a new feature as of the 1.3.5+ versions). If you have not yet grouped the frames, click outside these collectively selected frames to "break" the multiple selection. You can also combine these approaches by click-dragging around a number of frames, then Shift-clicking any you wish to select in addition or deselect.
+<h4>Selecting Frames Under Other Frames</h4>
+If all you want to do is select an individual frame that happens to be completely underneath some other frame, hold Shift+Ctrl, and click serially on a particular spot to toggle through the frames covering that spot. You will cycle through the frames, but also at some point select none of them.
+<p><i>Note: if you find an inability to select a frame underneath another using this method, consider that this frame may be on another layer. You may only work on one layer at a time.</i>
+<h3>Line and Colors of Frames</h3>
+The line of a frame is the border. For text and image frames, the default color of the line is None, so none of the line settings have any meaning until the line is given a color in the Colors tab. The default background or fill color of text and image frames is also None. For Shapes and Polygons, the default of both of these is Black. For all kinds of frames these default colors can be set in File > Preferences > Tools.
+<h3>Text Flow Around Frame</h3>
+<table cellpadding="5">
+<tr><td>
+The first important thing to remember is that this can be a property of any kind of frame, and that it applies to any text frames <i>underneath</i> it, underneath being not only on a lower level, but also a lower layer.
+<p>Secondly, you need to choose whether you want flow around the frame, the contour line, or the boundary box &ndash; making your choice in the Shape tab of Properties. For text and image frames, all 3 coincide with each other when they are created. As for shapes and polygons, only a rectangle would show this property, otherwise only the frame and contour lines coincide. Details will be found elsewhere, but in the Properties > Shape tab you can edit the frame/shape or contour line independently.
+<p>In this screenshot below, the left column flows around the frame, the right around an edited contour line:
+</td></tr>
+<tr><td align="center"><img src="images/text_flow.png"></td></tr>
+</table>
+
+</body>
+</html>
/en/WwFrames.html
Property changes:
Added: svn:executable
## -0,0 +1 ##
+*
\ No newline at end of property
Index: en/EditingShapes.html
===================================================================
--- en/EditingShapes.html (nonexistent)
+++ en/EditingShapes.html (revision 15137)
@@ -0,0 +1,95 @@
+<html>
+<head>
+ <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8"/>
+ <title>Editing Shapes</title>
+</head>
+
+<h2>Editing Shapes</h2>
+Many of the objects that can be incorporated into a Scribus document are vector drawings, and as such can be edited. Even though the title seems to refer to the geometric shapes that can be easily created, the same procedures can be applied to all of these:
+<ul>
+<li>Shapes</li>
+<li>Polygons</li>
+<li>Frames - all types</li>
+<li>Contour lines</li>
+<li>Bézier curves</li>
+<li>Freehand lines</li>
+<li>Outlines created from text glyphs</li>
+<li>Imported vector drawings, such as EPS and SVG</li>
+</ul>
+As you may be aware or recall, when you consider the ability to convert from one kind of object to another, there is a great deal of flexibility in what you can do. Here we have edited the shape of a text frame, then taken a large glyph, converted to an outline, then converted to an image frame, and finally we take a polygon and convert to a text frame. The final state of the object determines its editing capabilities, so the large B can be edited like any other image frame, the polygon can have its text edited in Story Editor.
+<table cellpadding=3><tr>
+<td><img src="images/edit_shapes.png" ALT="Edit examples" ALIGN=left></td></tr>
+</table>
+
+<h3>Properties: Shape</h3>
+<table cellpadding=3><tr>
+<td>Here is our Shape tab from Properties, or at least the bigger part of it. We'll get to what's left (Fill Rules) farther down below in <b>Combining Polygons</b>. Let's look at the <b>Round Corners</b> item first, since it's a simple kind of edit, that does what it says. Since the spinbox is active, we know that the object this relates to is either a "regular" frame, like text, image, or render frame, or it's the rectangle shape (and not the 4-sided polygon). What the number in the spinbox refers to is the radius of the corner. You can keep going up on this until 2 adjacent rounding operations meet &ndash; if you start with a square, for example, you will end up with a circle. A rectangle looks more like a capsule with flattened sides and rounded ends. This could just as easily be a text or image frame.</td>
+<td rowspan=2><img src="images/prop_shape.png" ALT="Properties: Shape" ALIGN=right></td>
+</tr>
+<tr><td><img src="images/round_rectangle.png" ALT="Rounded rectangle" ALIGN=left></td></tr>
+</table>
+<table cellpadding=3><tr>
+<td>The next quickie edit is the icon with the drop-down arrow, next to the <b>Edit</b> button. The drop-down lists are the familiar ones from the toolbar shape icon, but this is a transformation, not making a new shape. Thus we can convert our capsule to a squat and overfed-looking Tux if we want.
+<p>In fact, we can do this with text and other frames as well, although you can expect the utility of a Tux-shaped text frame to be limited.
+</td>
+<td><img src="images/squat_tux.png" ALIGN=left></td></tr>
+</table>
+<h3>Edit Button</h3>
+<table cellpadding="3"><tr>
+<td align=center width=200><img src="images/shape_edit.png"></td>
+<td>Now we get to the main event here, editing a shape/frame with its nodes and control points. When you click the <b>Edit</b> button on the Shape tab, the <b>Nodes</b> dialog to the right pops up and your shape/frame is transformed something like what you see on the left, with these blue and magenta circles.
+<p>Something to note at the outset is that generally where there is a sharp corner in a shape you only see the blue nodes, but where there is a smooth curve of some sort, these magenta control points are visible, sticking out like antennae from the node. Actually, all of these nodes have control points, but you don't see them when they are at the same position as the node.</td>
+<td rowspan=3 valign=middle><img src="images/nodes_edit.png"></td>
+</tr>
+<tr><td></td><td><img src="images/node_edit_close.png" ALIGN=right></td>
+</tr>
+<tr><td colspan=2>As we begin to describe the usage of the shape edit dialog, let's use this numbering scheme to refer to the various buttons on the dialog to the far right.
+<p>When the dialog first comes up, button <b>1</b> will be selected, in which case you can move the blue nodes using the mouse. In addition to moving individual nodes, you can click-drag a line segment between nodes and move the segment along with its nodes. The segment retains its size, shape, and orientation &ndash; adjoining line segments do the adjusting.
+<p>If you click button <b>5</b>, you can then move the magenta control points. Once you have clicked on a node or control point it turns red, and at this point, in addition to moving it with the mouse, the <b>X-Pos</b> and <b>Y-Pos</b> spinboxes become active and refer to this selected point. If <b>Absolute Coordinates</b> is <b><i>not</i></b> checked, then these numbers are relative to the upper left corner of the bounding box for the frame or shape (<i>see What is a Bounding Box? below</i>). Let's mention at this point that all of our editing steps here are Undo-able, i.e. can be undone with <b>Ctrl-Z</b> in case you change your mind.
+<p>Button <b>2</b> allows for adding nodes, though they must be added somewhere along the line of the shape. Button <b>3</b> deletes the node you subsequently click on. The tooltip for button <b>4</b> says <i>Reset Control Points</i>, but it is not clear how to make this button active.
+<p>Button <b>6</b>, when clicked, allows for each individual control point to move independently. If button <b>7</b> is clicked, then the two control points at a node will arrange themselves on opposite side of a node and equidistant from it once either one is moved. This tends to produce a very smooth curved transition through the node. When a control point is selected, button <b>8</b> will be active and when clicked, resets the control point to its node's position.
+<p>Button <b>9</b> will split the curve/shape when it is checked &ndash; click this button, then click anywhere along the line. It will appear that a node has been created, like using button <b>2</b>, but actually there are now 2 nodes at that position, so that if you move one, you will see the line is broken. Button <b>10</b> performs the opposite procedure, by joining a broken curve or shape (<i>and can also be used to make a closed figure out of a Bezier curve</i>).
+<p>Finishing out these first 3 rows, the unnumbered buttons next to the one we've labeled 10 flip the shape horizontally or vertically, respectively.</td>
+</tr></table>
+<h3>Skewing</h3>
+<table cellpadding=3><tr>
+<td>The first full row of buttons below the numbered ones are skewing operations. Each click on the button skews the shape in a small increment. Here we see the results of skewing using the 4 buttons, left to right, just like our images, each being clicked 10 times. Initially, the tops of all these shapes had the same Y-Pos.</td>
+<td><img src="images/skewing.png" ALT="Skewing Example"></td>
+</tr></table>
+<h3>Rotating, Enlarging, Shrinking</h3>
+Below the 4 rows of buttons we have spinboxes paired with buttons to the left. These are quite intuitive and the two buttons are complementary actions, for rotation, and then two ways to enlarge and shrink, either by percentage or number of points. Each click produces the amount of change indicated in the spinbox.
+<p>
+<h3>What is a Bounding Box?</h3>
+<table cellpadding=3><tr>
+<td><img src="images/boundingbox.png" ALIGN=left></td>
+<td><img src="images/boundingbox1.png" ALIGN=left></td>
+<td>A <i>Bounding Box</i> is the rectangular space that defines the boundaries of a shape and all of its descriptive components. Here we see this illustrated on the far left, noting that the bounding box is much larger than the actual shape. When we go to edit mode in the near left, we see that the box must include all of the control points for the shape.
+<p>There is a constraint on the <b>X-Pos</b> and <b>Y-Pos</b> so that they cannot be less than 0.0 when referring to the Bounding Box, so you will not be able to use the spinboxes to move nodes or control points lower than this value. Nonetheless, they can be moved with the mouse and the bounding box's left upper corner will then reposition. Using <b>Absolute Coordinates</b> is another workaround, since these values can be less than zero.
+<p><b>Use Bounding Box</b> is one of the choices for Text Flow mode, as shown in the Shape tab graphic.
+</td>
+</tr></table>
+<br clear=all>
+<h3>Finally: What is a Contour Line?</h3>
+Or maybe we should say, what is it for? A contour line is itself never visible, except in this editing mode. Let's imagine you have a frame/shape which is not rectangular, and you wish to flow around it, but not necessarily follow the contours of the frame/shape. Even if it's a shape and has a bounding box, as we saw above sometimes the bounding box is not what we want either, therefore we can use a contour line to flow in our precisely desired way. While you are editing your contour line, you will see the text flow change to help you get the look you want.
+<table cellpadding=3><tr>
+<td><img src="images/frame_shape_flow.png" ALIGN=left></td>
+<td><img src="images/contourline_flow.png" ALIGN=left></td>
+</tr></table>
+<p>Contour lines are not considered part of the graphic components, so therefore its nodes and control points can be outside the bounding box.
+<h3>Combining Polygons</h3>
+This operation really applies to both polygons and shapes, and mixtures of the two. The idea is to combine 2 or more shapes on different levels into a single one.
+<table cellpadding=3><tr>
+<td><img src="images/combine_polygons.png"></td>
+<td><img src="images/combine_polygons1.png"></td>
+<td><img src="images/combine_polygons3.png"></td>
+</tr></table>
+This top row shows our starting point, with a shape overlapping a polygon, the shape having some transparency. In the middle, we select both by click-dragging the mouse around them, then select <b>Item > Combine Polygons</b> from the menu, to get what we see on the right. With this method, the colors derive from the bottom object.
+<table><tr>
+<td><img src="images/combine_polygons2.png"></td>
+<td><img src="images/combine_polygons4.png"></td>
+<td><img src="images/combine_polygons5.png"></td>
+</tr></table>
+In the left graphic here, we selected the shapes by holding down Shift and clicking the cross shape first, then combined, so even if you combine more than two shapes this way, the colors derive from the first one clicked. The middle shows that our combined polygon has retained the transparency. On the right, we see the results of <b>Item > Split Polygons</b>. It is not recommended to Undo combined polygons, since results are unpredictable and may cause a subsequent crash, depending on what you do next.
+<p>Something else to point out here is that in the bottom row, the leftmost combination uses an <b>Even-Odd Fill Rule</b> from the Shape tab, and the middle uses <b>Non Zero</b>. <i>You apply the fill rule after you combine polygons</i>.
+</body>
+</html>
/en/EditingShapes.html
Property changes:
Added: svn:executable
## -0,0 +1 ##
+*
\ No newline at end of property